Miller Center

Miller Center Endowed Chairs

Brian Balogh


Brian Balogh

Dorothy Danforth Compton Professor

E-mail: balogh@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-243-8971

Brian Balogh is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia, Compton Professor, and Chair of the National Fellowship Program.

Professor Balogh is the author of Chain Reaction: Expert Debate and Public Participation in American Commercial Nuclear Power, 1945–1975 (Cambridge University Press, 1991) and edited Integrating the Sixties: The Origins, Structures and Legitimacy of Public Policy in a Turbulent Decade (Pennsylvania University Press, 1996). He has published articles and essays about Progressive Era politics, the link between interest groups and public policy, and the legacy of Vietnam. He is currently completing A Government Out of Sight: The Mystery of National Authority in Nineteenth Century America (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

Professor Balogh's specialties: 20th Century U.S. History; Political History; American Government and Politics; Environmental History; History of Science and Technology; Nuclear Politics; Policy History; Political Culture; Presidential Leadership; Public Administration; and Special Interest Groups

 

David Leblang


David Leblang

J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance

E-mail: leblang@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-243-8193

David Leblang is a Faculty Associate in the GAGE program and J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance and Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. A specialist in political economy, Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, The Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense. He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and more twenty-five journal articles in publications including The American Journal of Politics, International Organization, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of International Money and Finance. He has received research support from the National Science Foundation. Leblang has written on the politics of economic growth, the determinants of exchange rate policy, the causes of currency crises and the link between elections and economic expectations. At present he is working on two large projects. The first examines the causes and consequences of international migration and the second explores the determinants of international housing policy.

 

Melvyn P. Leffler


Melvyn P. Leffler

Edward R. Stettinius Professor in the Department of History

E-mail: mpl4j@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-924-6422

Melvyn P. Leffler, co-chair of the Governing America in a Global Era Program, is Edward R. Stettinius professor in the Department of History at the University of Virginia. He has written extensively on the history of U.S. foreign economic relations and U.S. national security policy. He won the 1993 Bancroft Prize for his analysis of the early Cold War, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War (Stanford University Press, 1992). His most recent book is For the Soul of Mankind: the United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War (Hill and Wang, 2007). He is also the author of several articles and essays seeking to put contemporary developments after 9/11 in historical perspective.

Professor Leffler's specialties: Cold War, U.S. Foreign Relations, Diplomatic History, 20th Century Authoritarian & Totalitarian Governments

 

Jeffrey W. Legro


Jeffrey W. Legro

Randolph P. Compton Professor

E-mail: legro@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-924-3958

Jeffrey W. Legro is Compton Professor of World Politics and Chair of the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. He is Co-Chair of the Governing America in a Global Era Program at the Miller Center of Public Affairs. A specialist on international relations, Legro has served as a consultant to foundations, think tanks, publishers, and government agencies. He is the author of Rethinking the World: Great Power Strategies and International Order (2005), Cooperation Under Fire: Anglo-German Restraint During World War II (1995), a contributor to Peter Katzenstein, ed., The Culture of National Security (1996), and articles on topics such as American foreign policy, international cooperation and conflict, military doctrine and strategy, and the causes of foreign policy revolutions. In 2002–2003, Legro was a Fulbright professor at China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing.

Professor Legro's specialties: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security Strategy; Great Power Politics; International Order and Instability; Comparative Strategy (particularly the European Union and China)

 

Sidney Milkis


Sidney Milkis

White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics

E-mail: smm8e@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-924-6052

Sidney M. Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics and Assistant Director for Academic Programs at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.

His books include The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (1993); The Politics of Regulatory Change: A Tale of Two Agencies, with Richard A. Harris (1996); Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (1999); Presidential Greatness (2000), co-authored with Marc Landy; and The American Presidency: Origins and Development, 1776–2007 (2007), 5th edition, co-authored with Michael Nelson; and American Government: Balancing Rights and Democracy (2007), 2nd edition, with Marc Landy. He is the co-editor, with Jerome Mileur, of three volumes on twentieth-century political reform: Progressivism and the New Democracy (1999); The New Deal and the Triumph of Liberalism (2002); and The Great Society and the High Tide of Liberalism (2005). He is completing The Progressive Party Campaign of 1912 and the Rise of Mass Democracy (forthcoming, Kansas University Press). During the 2005–2006 academic year, he served as the president of the American Political Science Association's Politics and History Section.

Professor Milkis's specialties: American Government and Politics; American Political History; American Political Thought; Elections; Political Parties and Social Movements; Presidency; Progressivism; Regulatory Politics

 

Kenneth W. Thompson


Kenneth W. Thompson

White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics (emeritus)

E-mail: kwt8b@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-924-6049

Kenneth W. Thompson is Professor Emeritus for the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics and Director Emeritus of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He is the author of twenty-one major works and editor or contributor to some 250 additional works. His major interest is in normative approaches to international relations and in particular ethics and politics of foreign policy.

Professor Thompson's specialties: Cold War; Morality and Foreign Policy; Political Ethics; Normative Aspects of International Politics; War on Terror

 

Brantly Womack


Brantly Womack

Brantly Womack holds the Miller Center's C. K. Yen Chair and is Professor of Foreign Affairs at the University of Virginia.  He received his BA in politics and philosophy from the University of Dallas, and after a Fulbright in philosophy at the University of Munich earned his PhD in political science from University of Chicago.  He is the author of China Among Unequals: Asymmetric International Relationships in Asia (World Scientific Press 2010), and of China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry (Cambridge 2006), as well as over a hundred articles and book chapters.  He edited China’s Rise in Historical Perspective (Rowman and Littlefield 2010), the product of a lecture series at the Miller Center, and Contemporary Chinese Politics in Historical Perspective (Cambridge 1991).  In 2011 Womack received the China Friendship Award for his work with Chinese universities.  He holds honorary positions at Jilin University, East China Normal University, and Zhongshan (Sun Yat-Sen) University. 

E-mail: selverbw9c@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-924-2066

Brantly Womack is the C. K. Yen Professor and Professor of Politics.

 

James Sterling Young


James Sterling Young

Randolph P. Compton Professor (emeritus)

E-mail: jsy@virginia.edu

Phone: 434-982-2763

James Sterling Young is Senior Director of the Edward M. Kennedy Oral History Project and Randolph P. Compton Scholar at the Miller Center. He joined the University of Virginia in 1978 as professor in the Department of Government and Foreign Affairs and as director of the Program on the Presidency at the Miller Center. He is also formerly a professor and vice president of Columbia University, and founding member and past president of the Presidency Research Group. In his capacity as director of the Program on the Presidency at the Miller Center, Young launched the Center's basic research program on presidential oral history. The oral history interview project on the Carter presidency, which Young designed and directed, broke new ground in presidential research and became the prototype for the Center's continuing program in oral history. Young's writings include "The Washington Community, 1800–1828," which was awarded the Bancroft Prize.

Professor Young's specialties: American Government and Politics; Political History; Presidential Leadership; U.S. Political History