Miller Center

American President

James A. Garfield (1831–1881)

Portrait of James Garfield

Facts at a Glance

Term
20th President of the United States (1881)
Born
November 19, 1831, Orange Township, Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Nickname
None
Full Name
James Abram Garfield
Education
Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (now Hiram College), Williams College (graduated 1856)
Religion
Disciples of Christ
Marriage
November 11, 1858, to Lucretia Rudolph (1832–1918)
Children
Eliza A. (1860–1863), Harry A. (1863–1942), James R. (1865–1950), Mary (1867–1947), Irvin M. (1870–1951), Abram (1872–1958), Edward (1874–1876)
Career
Teacher, Public Official
Political Party
Republican
Writings
Diary, 1848–1874 (2 vols., 1967), ed. by H. J. Brown and F. D. Williams
Died
September 19, 1881, Elberon, New Jersey
Buried
Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio
A Life in Brief
James A. Garfield is remembered as one of the four “lost Presidents” who served rather uneventfully after the Civil War. Of the four lost Presidents—Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, and Harrison—Garfield is best remembered for his dramatic assassination a mere 100 days after he assumed office. More »

Essays on James Garfield and His Administration

James Abram Garfield
A Life in Brief
Life Before the Presidency
Campaigns and Elections
Domestic Affairs
Foreign Affairs
Death of the President
Family Life
The American Franchise
Impact and Legacy
Key Events
First Lady
Lucretia Garfield
Vice President
Chester Arthur (1881)
Secretary of State
James G. Blaine (1881)
Secretary of War
Robert Todd Lincoln (1881)
Postmaster General
Thomas L. James (1881)
Secretary of the Interior
Samuel J. Kirkwood (1881)
Secretary of the Treasury
William Windom (1881)
Attorney General
Isaac Wayne MacVeagh (1881)
Secretary of the Navy
William H. Hunt (1881)

Consulting Editor: Justus Doenecke

Professor Doenecke is a professor emeritus of history at the New College of Florida. His writings include:

The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur (University Press of Kansas, 1981)

Debating Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Foreign Policies, 1933–1945 (With Mark S. Stoler, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005)