Miller Center

Archive: Miller Center Fellowship Mentors

The Miller Center for Public Affairs has awarded more than 82 Fellowships to outstanding graduate students interested in ideas and issues related to American Political Development. The Fellowship includes pairing each Fellow with a "dream mentor" and over the years numerous scholars have worked with our Fellows. This page is a repository of Miller Center Fellows' mentors.

This is a list of mentors for the Fellowship program. Below the mentor's name and institution will be his or her student and institution along with the title of the Fellow's research project completed during the fellowship year.

Andy Achenbaum
Andy Achenbaum

Mentor: Andy Achenbaum, Professor of History and Social Work and Gerson and Sabina David Professor of Global Aging, University of Houston

Fellow: Katie Otis (2006), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Everything Old is New Again: What Policymakers and Baby Boomers Can Learn from the History of Aging and Retirement

Andy Achenbaum's work focuses on the history of aging, on which he has written five books: Older Americans: Vital Communities – Toward a Bold Vision of Societal Aging; Crossing Frontiers: Gerontology Emerges as a Science; Social Security: Visions and Revisions; Shades of Gray: Old Age, American Values and Federal Policies; and Old Age in the New Land: The American Experience Since 1790. He has also co-authored a number of books, including Profiles in Gerontology: A Biographical Dictionary (with Daniel M. Albert) and Changing Perceptions of Aging and the Aged (with Dena Shenk).

Richard N. Andrews
Richard "Pete" Andrews

Mentor: Richard N. Andrews, University of North Carolina

Fellow: Josh Ashenmiller (2002), University of California, Santa Barbara,
Environmental Impact Assessment in the Era of Limits

Richard “Pete” Andrews is Professor of Environmental Policy in the Department of Public Policy, UNC College of Arts and Sciences; he also holds joint appointments in the Department of City and Regional Planning and in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering of the Gillings School of Global Public Health, the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology, and the Carolina Institute for the Environment. From 2004 to 2009 he held the first Thomas Willis Lambeth Distinguished Professorship in Public Policy.His research interests include environmental policy institutions and instruments, environmental policy analysis, and United States and comparative environmental policy. He has written many books, articles, and public policy reports, including Managing the Environment, Managing Ourselves: A History of American Environmental Policy; "Politics, Economics, and Perceptions" in Conservation Biology (December 2001); and "The Environment in Business Decision Making" in Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities.

 
Kwame Appiah
Kwame Appiah

Mentor: Kwame Appiah, Princeton University

Fellow: Christopher Lebron (2007), Wilson Carey McWilliams Fellow; Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kwame Anthony Appiah is the Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. His research interests include the ethics and philosophy of the mind and language, political philosophy, and African and African-American intellectual history. His recent publications include Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers, The Ethics of Identity, and Thinking It Through. Among his other books are In My Father's House, Color Conscious: The Political Morality of Race (co-authored with Amy Gutmann), and Bu Me Bé: Proverbs of the Akan (co-authored with Peggy Appiah).


 

Mark Beissinger

Mentor: Mark R. Beissinger, Princeton University

Fellow: Jesse Driscoll, Stanford University
Exiting Anarchy: Militia Politics and the Post-Soviet Peace

Mark Beissinger is Professor of Politics at Princeton. His main fields of interest are nationalism, state-building, imperialism, and social movements, with special reference to the Soviet Union and the post-Soviet states. In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, he is author or editor of four books, including Nationalist Mobilization and the Collapse of the Soviet State (Cambridge University Press, 2002). He was the founding Director of Wisconsin's Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (1992–98), and was Chair of Wisconsin's Political Science Department (2001–04). He currently serves as Past President of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies and as Vice President of the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. His research has been supported by the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the Wissenshaftskolleg zu Berlin, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the National Science Foundation, the United States Institute for Peace, and the Ford, Rockefeller, and Olin Foundations. He is working on a book tentatively entitled Imperial Reputation: The Politics of Empire in a World of Nation-States.

 
Michael Bernstein
Michael Bernstein

Mentor: Michael Bernstein, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor of History and Economics, Tulane University

Fellow: Derek S. Hoff (2003), University of Virginia
Are We Too Many? The Political Economy of Population in the Twentieth-Century United States

Michael Bernstein's teaching and research interests focus on the economic and political history of the United States, macroeconomic theory, industrial organization economics, and the history of economic theory.  His publications explore the connections between political and economic processes in modern industrial societies, as well as the interaction of economic knowledge and professional expertise with those processes as a whole. Along with numerous articles and anthology chapters, Bernstein has published four volumes: The Great Depression: Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939 (Cambridge University Press, 1987); Understanding American Economic Decline [co-edited with David Adler] (Cambridge University Press, 1994); The Cold War and Expert Knowledge: New Essays on the History of the National Security State [co-edited with Allen Hunter] (a special issue of the Radical History Review 63 (Fall, 1995); and A Perilous Progress: Economists and Public Purpose in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 2001).

 
Martha Biondi
Martha Biondi

Mentor: Martha Biondi, Associate Professor of African American Studies and History, Northwestern University

Fellow: Heather Lewis (2005), New York University
Scaling Down: Half a Century of Community Control in New York City's Schools, 1945–95

Martha Biondi's research focuses on 20th Century African American History with an emphasis on social movements, politics, labor, gender, cities, and international affairs.  Most recently, she is the author of The Black Revolution on Campus (University of California Press, 2012)/  The book which describes an extraordinary but forgotten chapter of the black freedom struggle, detailing the efforts of black students in the late 1960s and early 1970s to organizee hundreds of protests that in turned sparked a period of crackdown, negotiation, and reform that profoundly transformed college life. Vividly demonstrating the critical linkage between the student movement and changes in university culture, the book illustrates how victories in establishing Black Studies ultimately produced important intellectual innovations and had a lasting impact on academic research and university curricula over the past 40 years. Biondi has also written To Stand and Fight: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Postwar New York City, for which she received the Myers Outstanding Book Award (2004) from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights in North America, and the Thomas J. Wilson Prize, awarded by the Board of Syndics of Harvard University Press for the best first book of the year, in 2003.

 
Lawrence Brown
Lawrence Brown

Mentor: Lawrence Brown, Columbia University

Fellow: Nicole Kazee (2007), Yale University

Lawrence Brown, Columbia University Professor of Health Policy and Management, is an expert in the fields of health care reform, health care policy, competition and regulation, and the uninsured. He has written many books and articles, including Health Policy and the Disadvantaged; Politics and Health Care Organizations: Health Maintenance Organizations as Federal Policy; "Competition and the New Accountability: Do Market Incentives and Medical Outcomes Conflict or Cohere?" in Competitive Approaches to Health Care Reform; and "The National Politics of Oregon's Rationing Plan," in Health Affairs (Summer 1991).


 
W. Elliott Brownlee
W. Elliott Brownlee

Mentor: W. Elliott Brownlee, University of California, Santa Barbara

Fellow: Ajay Mehrotra (2001), University of Chicago
Creating the Modern American Fiscal State: The Political Economy of U.S. Tax Policy, 1880–1930

W. Elliot Brownlee is Professor Emeritus of American Economic History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current research interests include the financing of World War I, taxing and spending during the Reagan Presidency, and comparative fiscal history of Japan and the United States since World War I. Among his recent publications are Federal Taxation in America: A Short History; The Reagan Presidency: Pragmatic Conservatism and its Legacies (co-edited with Hugh Davis Graham); and "Taxation in the U.S. during World War I: Alternatives and Legacies" in Taxation, State, and Civil Society in Germany and the United States from the 18th to the 20th Century (forthcoming).

 

Tom Burke

Mentor: Tom Burke, Professor of Political Science, Wellesley College

Fellow: Emily Zackin, Princeton University
Positive Rights in the Constitutions of the United States

In addition to his time at Wellesley, Tom Burke has been a visiting professor at Harvard and at the University of California–Berkeley, and a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and with the Robert Wood Johnson Scholars in Health Policy Program.  His research focuses on the place of rights and litigation in public policy. Tom’s research focuses on the place of rights and litigation in public policy. His most recent project, with co-author Jeb Barnes, examines how the American emphasis on court-based rights shapes U.S. politics. Another project, also with Barnes, examines how organizations respond to social change laws. Recent publications include "Making Way: Legal Mobilization, Organizational Response and Wheelchair Access (Law and Society Review, 2012) and "Is There an Empirical Literature on Rights?" (Studies in Law, Politics and Society, 2009).

 

Daniel Byman

Mentor: Daniel Byman, Professor of Security Studies, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Fellow: Walter Ladwig, University of Oxford
Assisting Counterinsurgents: U.S. Security Assistance and Internal War, 1946–1991

In addition to serving as a professor in the Walsh School of Foreign Service,  Daniel Byman has an appointment in the Georgetown department of Government.  He served as director of Georgetown's Security Studies Program and Center for Security Studies from 2005 until 2010.  Professor Byman is a Senior Fellow and Director of Research at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. From 2002 to 2004 he served as a Professional Staff Member with the 9/11 Commission and with the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. Before joining the Inquiry Staff he was the Research Director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy at the RAND Corporation. Previous to this, Professor Byman worked as an analyst on the Middle East for the U.S. government.  He is the author of A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism (Oxford, 2011); The Five Front War: The Better Way to Fight Global Jihad (Wiley, 2007); Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism (Cambridge, 2005); Keeping the Peace: Lasting Solutions to Ethnic Conflict (Johns Hopkins, 2002); and co-author of Things Fall Apart: Containing the Spillover from the Iraqi Civil War (Brookings, 2007) and The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might (Cambridge, 2002). Professor Byman has also written extensively on a range of topics related to terrorism, international security, civil and ethnic conflict, and the Middle East. His recent articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy, as well as journals including Political Science Quarterly, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, International Security, and Journal of Strategic Studies. You can follow Professor Byman on twitter @dbyman.

 
Daniel Carpenter
Daniel Carpenter

Mentor: Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government and Director of the Center for American Political Studies, Harvard University

Fellows: Joanna Grisinger (2002), University of Chicago,
Reforming the State: Reorganization and the Federal Government, 1937–1964

Dominique Tobbell (2007), University of Pennsylvania

Pharmaceutical Networks: The Political Economy of Drug Development in the United States, 1945–1980

Quinn Mulroy (2010), Columbia University

Litigation, Public Policy Enforcement: The Regulatory Power of Private Litigation and the American Bureaucracy

Daniel Carpenter graduated from Georgetown University in 1989 with distinction in Honors Government and received his doctorate in political science from the University of Chicago in 1996. He taught previously at Princeton University (1995-1998) and the University of Michigan (1998-2002). He joined the Harvard University faculty in 2002. Dr. Carpenter's primary interest is in the theoretical, historical and quantitative analysis of American political development, public bureaucracies and government regulation, particularly regulation of health products. He is most recently the author of Preventing Regulatory Capture, with David Moss (Cambridge University Press, 2013).  His dissertation received the 1998 Harold D. Lasswell Award from the American Political Science Association and as a book—The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001)—was awarded the APSA's Gladys Kammerer Prize as well as the Charles Levine Prize of the International Political Science Association. His newly published book on pharmaceutical regulation in the United States is entitled Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010).

 
Elisabeth Clemens
Elisabeth Clemens

Mentor: Elisabeth Clemens, Professor and Chair of Sociology, University of Chicago

Fellow: Shamira Gelbman (2005), University of Virginia,
Coalitions of the Unwilling: Insurgency and Enfranchisement in the United States and South Africa

Elisabeth Clemens analyzes the processes behind institutional change. She is currently researching the privatization of public education. She has written many books and articles, including The People's Lobby: Organizational Innovation and the Rise of Interest Group Politics in the United States, 1890–1925; "The Typical Tools for the Job: Research Strategies in Institutional Analysis" (with Marc Schneiberg) in Sociological Theory (September 2006); and "Sociology as a Historical Science" in The American Sociologist (Summer 2006). She also co-edited Remaking Modernity: Politics and Processes in Historical Sociology with Julia Adams and Ann Shola Orloff.

 
Lisa Cobbs Hoffman
Lisa Cobbs Hoffman

Mentor: Lisa Cobbs Hoffman, Professor of History and Dwight E. Stanford Chair in U.S. Foreign Relations, San Diego State University

Fellow: Katherine Unterman (2010), Yale University
Nowhere to Hide: International Rendition and American Power

Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman's is most recently the author of American Umpire (Harvard University Press, 2013), a reinterpretation of America’s role in the world that places the United States at the center of the global transformation in which nation-states replaced empires as the major powers of international relations.  Her previous book, The Rich Neighbor Policy: Rockefeller and the Kaiser in Brazil (Yale University Press, 1992) won the Allan Nevis Prize for literary distinction in the writing of history. She is the author of All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the 1960s (Harvard 2000), among other books of histor and historical fiction. Dr. Hoffman received her Ph.D. in History from Stanford, and is a political commentator, mother, and expert pie maker. She wrote her first novel, In the Lion's Den, while teaching in Dublin, Ireland, on a Fulbright.

 
David Colby
David C. Colby

Mentors: David C. Colby, Vice President of Research and Evaluation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Fellow: Joeseph Crepsino (2001), Stanford University
Strategic Accommodation: Civil Rights Opponents in Mississippi and Their Impact on American Racial Politics, 1953–1972

As vice president of research and evaluation, Colby leads a team dedicated to improving the nation's ability to understand key health and health care issues so that informed decisions can be made concerning the way Americans maintain health and obtain health care. He is guided by the principle that research speaks truth to power when it is practical and communicated to a broader audience, and views his role of developing and disseminating focused research doing just that.  Prior to his current position, Colby served in a myriad of leadership roles at the Foundation.  Previously, he served as the deputy director of two commissions: the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and the Physician Payment Review Commission. He is also a former coordinator of the Masters of Policy Sciences Program at University of Maryland, Baltimore County as well as a former assistant dean at Williams College. Colby’s published research has focused on Medicaid and Medicare, media coverage of AIDS, and, in political science, civil rights. He was an associate editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law from 1995 to 2002. In 2000, he was elected to the National Academy of Social Insurance for his contributions to the nation’s understanding of social insurance programs.  Born in California, he received a PhD in political science from the University of Illinois, an MA from Ohio University, and a BA from Ohio Wesleyan University.

 
Alan Dawley
Alan Dawley

Mentor: Alan Dawley, The College of New Jersey

Fellow: Beverly Gage (2002), Columbia University,
The Wall Street Explosion: Terrorism, Anticommunism, and the Origins of the FBI

As Professor of History at The College of New Jersey, Dawley specialized in 19th- and 20th-century United States history. His books include Changing the World: American Progressives in War and Revolution, 1914–1924; Struggles for Justice: Social Responsibility and the Liberal State; and Class and Community: The Industrial Revolution in Lynn. He has also the author of articles such as "Enforced Consent: American Progressives in War and Revolution" in Acoma (Winter 2000) and "Race and Class" in Labor History (Fall 1994). 

 
Lowell Dittmer
Lowell Dittmer

Mentor: Lowell Dittmer, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkley

Fellow: George Xuezhi Guo (2001), University of Virginia
The Guanxi (Interpersonal Relations) of Chinese Communist Elite: Theory and Practice

Lowell Dittmer is a scholar of contemporary China whose research interests include the impact of reform on Chinese Communist authority and the China-Taiwan-U.S. triangle's relationship to East Asian regional politics. Among his recent publications are South Asia's Nuclear Crisis (M.E. Sharpe, 2005); China Under Modernization (Westview Press, 1994); China's Quest for National Identity, co-authored with Samuel Kim (Cornell University Press, 1993).

 
Daniel Ernst
Daniel Ernst

Mentor: Daniel Ernst, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

Fellow: Jefferson Decker (2007), Columbia University

Daniel Ernst specializes in American legal history. He co-edited Total War and the Law: The American Home Front in World War II (Praeger, 2002) as well as the American Society for Legal History's book series, "Studies in Legal History." His book, Lawyers Against Labor (University of Illinois Press, 1995), received the Littleton Griswold Award of the American Historical Association.  His other publications include "The Politics of Administrative Law: New York's Anti-Bureaucracy Clause and the O'Brian-Wagner Campaign of 1938," Law & History Review (2009), "Dicey's Disciple on the D.C. Circuit: Judge Harold Stephens and Administrative Reform, 1933–1940" in Georgetown Law Journal (March 2002); "State, Party, and Harold M. Stephens: The Utahn Origins of an Anti-New Dealer" in Western Legal History (Summer/Fall 2001); and "Willard Hurst and the Administrative State: From Williams to Wisconsin" in Law and History Review (Spring 2000).
 

 

John Esposito

Mentor: John Esposito, University Professor, Professor of Religion and International Affairs and of Islamic Studies, Georgetown University

Fellow: Kathryn Gardner, Notre Dame University
Politicizing Religion: A Comparative Look at the Origins and Development of Muslim Incorporation Policies in France, Great Britain, and the United States, 1945–2008

John L. Esposito is Founding Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding in the Walsh School of Foreign Service.  Esposito has served as consultant to the U.S. Department of State and other agencies, European and Asian governments and corporations, universities, and the media worldwide. A former President of the Middle East Studies Association of North America and of the American Council for the Study of Islamic Societies, Vice Chair of the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy, and member of the World Economic Forum’s Council of 100 Leaders, he is currently Vice President (2011) and President Elect (2012) of the American Academy of Religion and a member of the E. C. European Network of Experts on De-Radicalisation and the board of C-1 World Dialogue and an ambassador for the UN Alliance of Civilizations. He is the author of more than 45 books and monographs, including, most recelty, What Everyone Needs to Know About Islam (Oxford University Press, 2012) and Islamophobia: The Challenges of Pluralism in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2011)

 

Henry Farrell

Mentor: Henry Farrell, George Washington University

Fellow: David Karpf, University of Pennsylvania
Network-Enhanced Goods and Internet-Mediated Organizations: The Internet's Effects on Political Participation, Organization, and Mobilization

Henry Farrell earned a Ph.D. in Government from Georgetown University in 2000. He also holds a B.A. and M.A. in Politics from University College Dublin. His publications include: "Constructing the International Foundations of E-Commerce: The EU-US Safe Harbor Agreement," in International Organization, 57,2 (2003); "Trust, Distrust, and Power," in Distrust, ed. Russell Hardin (Russell Sage Foundation, forthcoming); and "Trust and Political Economy: Comparing the Effects of Institutions on Inter-Firm Cooperation," in Comparative Political Studies (forthcoming). Farrell is a member of the American Political Science Association, the International Society for the New Institutional Economics, the International Studies Association, and the European Union Studies Association.

 
Louis Fisher
Louis Fisher

Mentor: Louis Fisher, Congressional Research Service, Government Division, Library of Congress

Fellow: Jasmine L. Farrier (2000), University of Texas at Austin,
Why Congress Delegates Decisions on the Budget: Institutional Origins and Consequences

Louis Fisher is a Senior Specialist in the Government and Finance Division of the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress. He is an expert on the budgeting processes of the United States government. His books include Presidential War Power, Constitutional Conflicts Between Congress and the President, and Presidential Spending Power. He appeared before the House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence in 1994 to discuss "Public Disclosure of the Aggregate Intelligence Budget Figure." In 2004 he submitted a declaration for the case Steven Aftergood v. Central Intelligence Agency.

 
Dr. Alton Frye
Dr. Alton Frye

Mentor: Dr. Alton Frye, Council on Foreign Relations

Fellow: Jamie Morin (2002), Yale University,
Dismantling Defense: The Programmatic Politics of Post-Cold War Defense Retrenchment

Alton Frye, Presidential Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Council on Foreign Relations, founded the Council's Washington program and its national program. During his tenure at the Council, he served as its president, senior vice president, and national director. Prior to investing more than 30 years in the Council, he served as a charter fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a strategic analyst for the RAND Corporation. He is the author of several works, including Humanitarian Intervention: Crafting a Workable Doctrine; A Responsible Congress: The Politics of National Security; and Congress Evolves: The Changing Politics of American Defense.

 
William Galston
William Galston

Mentor: William Galston, University of Maryland

Fellow: Derek Webb (2006), University of Notre Dame
Paving the Rights Infrastructure: Civic Education in the Presidencies of Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt

William Galston is the College Park Professor in University of Maryland's School of Public Policy. He is a political theorist with expertise in family policy, domestic policy, American politics, campaigns, elections, and education. He is the author of Public Matters: Essays on Politics, Policy and Religion; Liberal Pluralism: The Implications of Value Pluralism for Political Theory and Practice; "Individual Experience and Social Policy: Thinking Practically about Overcoming Radical and Ethnic Prejudice" in NOMOS XLIII: Moral and Political Education; and "Diversity and Distrust: Civic Education in a Multicultural Democracy" in Ethics (January 2002).

 
Eric Gartzke
Eric Gartzke

Mentor: Eric Gartzke, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of California at San Diego (UCSD)

Fellow: Zane Kelly (2009), University of Colorado at Boulder
Finance at War: Debt, Borrowing, and Conflict

Erik Gartzke is associate professor of Political Science at the University of California at San Diego. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Iowa. He studies the impact of information on war, peace and international institutions. Gartzke's research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Politics and elsewhere. He is currently working on two books – one on globalization and the other on the democratic peace.

 
Gary Gerstle
Gary Gerstle

Mentor: Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University

Fellows: Justin J. Wert (2004), University of Pennslyvania
The Not-So-Great Writ: Habeas Corpus & American Political Development

Carl Bon Tempo (2002), University of Virginia,
The Politics of American Refugee Policy, 1952–1980

Gary Gerstle is the James Stahlman Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. He focuses on 20th century United States, examining how the United States changes its borders and national identity in order to welcome or exclude immigrants and other minorities. One of his current research projects is a comparative and transnational history of race and nation in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. His books include Working Class Americanism: The Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 1914–1960 and American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century.

 
Hugh Davis Graham
Hugh Davis Graham

Mentor: Hugh Davis Graham, Vanderbilt University

Fellow: Paul C. Milazzo (2000), University of Virginia,
Legislating the Solution to Pollution: Congress and the Development of Federal Water Pollution Control Policy in the United States, 1945–1975

Hugh Davis Graham was the Holland N. McTyeire Professor of American History and Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University. He was an expert on civil rights and wrote Civil Rights and the Presidency: Race and Gender in American Politics, 1960–1972; Collision Course: The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy in America; and The Rise of American Research Universities: Elites and Challengers in the Postwar Era. He also co-edited two books with W. Elliot Brownlee: Federal Taxation in America: A Short History and The Reagan Presidency: Pragmatic Conservatism and Its Legacies.

 
John Mark Hansen
John Mark Hansen

Mentor: John Mark Hansen, University of Chicago

Fellow: Lorraine K. Gates (2000), University of Virginia,
The Weight of Their Votes: Southern Women and Politics in the 1920s

John Mark Hansen is the University of Chicago's Dean of Social Sciences and the Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Political Science. His work has centered on interest groups, citizen activism, and public opinion. He has published two books entitled Mobilization, Participation, and Democracy in America (co-authored with Steven Rosenstone) and Gaining Access: Congress and the Farm Lobby, 1919–1981. He has also written articles such as "Individuals, Institutions, and Public Preferences over Public Finance" in American Political Science Review (September 1998), for which he received the journal's Heinz Eulau Award for the Best Article Published in 1998.

 
Ellen Herman
Ellen Herman

Mentor: Ellen Herman, University of Oregon

Fellow: Joy Rohde (2006), University of Pennsylvania
"The Social Scientists' War": Expertise in a Cold War Nation

Ellen Herman is University of Oregon's Associate Professor of 20th-Century American History. Her interests include human sciences, social engineering, and therapeutic culture. She published her first book in 1995, The Romance of American Psychology: Political Culture in the Age of Experts. Currently, she is writing a book about 20th-century child adoption, which is entitled Kinship by Design. Among her recent publications are "Can Kinship Be Designed and Still Be Normal? The Curious Case of Child Adoption" in Histories of the Normal and the Abnormal: Social and Cultural Histories of Norms and Normativity and "Rules for Realness: Child Adoption in a Therapeutic Culture" in Therapeutic Culture: Triumph and Defeat.

 
Chris Howard
Chris Howard

Mentor: Chris Howard, College of William and Mary

Fellow: Lori Fritz (2003), University of Virginia,
Weaving the Safety Net, Strand by Strand: State Healthcare Regimes

Chris Howard is the Pamela Harriman Professor of Government and Public Policy at the College of William and Mary. His research interests include American politics and public policy. He has written two books: The Welfare State Nobody Knows: Debunking Myths about U.S. Social Policy and The Hidden Welfare State: Tax Expenditures and Social Policy in the United States. In addition, he has written many articles which have appeared in The American Political Science Review, Journal of Policy History, Political Research Quarterly, Public Administration Review, and Studies in American Political Development.

 
John Ikenberry
John Ikenberry

Mentor: John Ikenberry, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

Fellow: Kyle Lascurette (2010), University of Virginia
Orders of Exclusion: The Strategic Sources of International Orders and Great Power Ordering Preferences

G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Professor Ikenberry is the author of After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars (Princeton, 2001), which won the 2002 Schroeder-Jervis Award presented by the American Political Science Association (APSA) for the best book in international history and politics. The book has been translated into Japanese, Italian and Chinese. He is currently writing a book entitled Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American System (Princeton, forthcoming). A collection of his essays entitled Liberal Order and Imperial Ambition: American Power and International Order (Polity Press, 2006), has also appeared.

 
Akira Iriye
Akira Iriye

Mentor: Akira Iriye, Harvard University

Fellow: Stephen Porter (2005), University of Chicago
Defining Public Responsibility in a Global Age: Refugee Resettlement in the U.S., 1933 to 1980

Akira Iriye, Harvard University Professor Emeritus of History, specialized in American diplomatic history and Japanese-American relations. He has written six books: From Nationalism to Internationalism: U.S. Foreign Policy to 1914; Cultural Internationalism and World Order; The Globalizing of America; China and Japan in the Global Setting; Fifty Years of Japanese-American Relations; Power and Culture: The Japanese-American War, 1941–1945; and Pacific Estrangement: Japanese and American Expansion, 1897–1911.

 
Meg Jacobs
Meg Jacobs

Mentor: Meg Jacobs, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Fellow: Julia Ott (2005), Yale University
When Wall Street Met Main Street: The Quest for an Investors' Democracy and the Emergence of the American Retail Investor, 1900–1930

Meg Jacobs is the Class of 1947 Career Development Associate Professor of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She researches 20th-century American politics, public policy, and business history. She is the author of Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America and is the co-editor of The Democratic Experiment: New Directions in American Political History (with William J. Novak and Julian E. Zelizer). Her article, "Energy Crises Now and Then," in Spectrum (Winter 2007) won the 2007 Levitan Prize.

 
Richard R. John
Richard R. John

Mentor: Richard R. John, University of Illinois, Chicago

Fellow: Michael Fein (2001), Brandeis University
Public Works: New York Road Building and the American State, 1880–1956

Richard R. John is Professor of History and Adjunct Professor of Communication at the University of Illinois, Chicago. His primary research interests are U.S. cultural and institutional history before 1940, American political development, and the history of business, technology, and communications. He is the author of Spreading the News: The American Postal System from Franklin to Morse, for which he received the Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians. In addition, he is the editor of Ruling Passions: Political Economy in Nineteenth-Century America and has also written several articles, many of which have appeared in Journal of Policy History.

 
Tony Judt
Tony Judt

Mentor: Tony Judt, New York University

Fellow: Michael Morgan (2007), Yale University

Tony Judt is New York University's Erich Maria Remarque Professor of European Studies and Director of the Remarque Institute. His research interests include 19th and 20th-century French social history as well as French and European intellectual and political history since World War II. He is currently working on a history of Europe since 1945 and has written many books, including The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron and the French Twentieth Century; Past Imperfect: French Intellectuals 1944–1956; Marxism and the French Left: Essays on Labour and Politics in France, 1830–1981; and Socialism in Provence, 1871–1914: A Study in the Origins of the Modern French Left.

 
Miles Kahler
Miles Kahler

Mentor: Miles Kahler, Professor of Pacific International Relations, University of California, San Diego

Fellow: Sarah Bush (2010), Princeton University
The Democracy Establishment

Miles Kahler is Rohr Professor of Pacific International Relations at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies and Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego. From 2001 to 2005, he served as interim director and founding director of the Institute for International, Comparative, and Area Studies (IICAS) at UC San Diego. Recent publications include Networked Politics: Agency, Power, and Governance (editor, Cornell University Press, 2009),  Territoriality and Conflict in an Era of Globalization (co-edited with Barbara Walter, Cambridge University Press, 2006), Governance in a Global Economy (co-edited with David Lake, Princeton University Press, 2003), and Leadership Selection in the Major Multilaterals (Institute for International Economics, 2001). Current research interests include international institutions and global governance, the evolution of the nation-state, multilateral strategies toward failed states, and the political economy of international finance. He directs the research project on Rebuilding Political Authority in States at Risk at UC San Diego, supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

 
Elizabeth Kier
Elizabeth Kier

Mentor: Elizabeth Kier, University of Washington

Fellow: Ronald Krebs (2001), Columbia University
A School for the Nation? Military Institutions and the Boundaries of Nationality

Elizabeth Kier is a University of Washington Associate Professor of Political Science. Her specialization is international relations, and she focuses particularly on international security and civil-military relations. She won the 1998 Edgar S. Furniss Award for her book, Imagining War: French and British Military Doctrine Between the Wars. Her recent articles include "Homosexuals in the U.S. Military: Open Integration and Combat Effectiveness" in International Security (Autumn 1998) and "Rights and Fights: Sexual Orientation and Military Effectiveness" in International Security (Summer 1999, coauthors: Tarak Barkawi, Christopher Dandeker, and Melissa Wells-Petry).

 
Michael Klarman
Michael Klarman

Mentor: Michael Klarman, University of Virginia

Fellow: Christopher Schmidt (2003), Harvard University,
Postwar Liberalism and the Origins of Brown v. Board of Education

Michael Klarman is University of Virginia's James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law, Professor of History, and Elizebth D. and Richard A. Merill Research Professor. He specializes in criminal law, constitutional law, constitutional theory, and constitutional history. His book, From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality, won the 2005 Bancroft Prize. He has also written several articles, including "How Great were the 'Great' Marshall Court Decisions?" in Virginia Law Review (October 2001) and "Bush v. Gore Through the Lens of Constitutional History" in California Law Review (Fall 2001).

 
Gary Laderman
Gary Laderman

Mentor: Gary Laderman, Emory University

Fellow: Stephanie Muravchik (2005), University of Virginia
New Creatures in Christ: American Faith in an Age of Psychology

Gary Laderman, Emory University Professor of American Religious History and Culture, studies religion and health. He is the author of two books: Rest in Peace: A Cultural History of Death and the Funeral Home in Twentieth-Century America and The Sacred Remains: American Attitudes Toward Death, 1799–1883. In addition, he co-edited the three-volume Religion and American Cultures: An Encyclopedia of Traditions, Diversity, and Popular Expressions (with Luis León). He is currently working on another book, entitled Godless in America: Religious Anchors in Contemporary America.

 
Marc Landy
Marc Landy

Mentor: Marc Landy, Boston College

Fellows: Caroline Lee (2005), University of California at San Diego
Compromising Natures: Moral Economies of Environmental Decision Making

Kathleen Grammatico Ferraiolo (2003), University of Virginia,
A Theory of Drug Control Policy in the Twentieth Century and the Success of Drug Law Reform in the 1990s

Marc Landy, Professor of Political Science and Faculty Chair of the Irish Institute at Boston College, specializes in American political development, the American presidency, and environmental politics and policy. He is the author of many publications, including American Politics: The Enduring Conflict and Presidential Greatness (both with Sidney Milkis); The Environmental Protection Agency from Nixon to Clinton: Asking the Wrong Questions (with Marc Roberts and Stephen Thomas); and "Local Government and Environmental Policy" in Dilemmas of Scale in American Federal Democracy.

 
Nancy Langston
Nancy Langston

Mentor: Nancy Langston, Professor, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Fellow: Merlin Chowkwanyun (2010), University of Pennsylvania
The Dilemmas of 'Community Health': 1945-2000

Nancy Langston is Professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a joint appointment in the Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies. Langston has been the recipient of fellowships from the Marshall Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Humanities Center, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Council of Learned Societies. Her first book won the 1997 Forest History Society Prize for best book in forest and conservation history, and a recent article won the 2009 Leopold-Hidy Prize for best article in Environmental History. In March 2009, she finished her two-year term as President of the American Society for Environmental History. Her most recent book, Toxic Bodies: Hormone Disruptors and the Legacy of DES, explores why the environment has become saturated with synthetic chemicals and the subsequent effects on hormones.

 
Richard Lapchick
Richard Lapchick

Mentor: Richard Lapchick, University of Central Florida

Fellow: Damion Thomas (2001), University of California, Los Angeles
"The Good Negroes": African-American Athletes and the Cultural Cold War, 1945–1968

Richard Lapchick is University of Central Florida's Director and Chair of the Sports Business Management Program. He is also President and CEO of the National Consortium for Academics and Sports. Before joining the faculty of University of Central Florida, he co-founded and directed the Center for the Study of Sport at Northeastern University for seventeen years, taught political science as an associate professor at Virginia Wesleyan College, and was Senior Liaison Officer at the United Nations. He has written 11 books, including Smashing Barriers; Fractured Focus: Sport as a Reflection of Society; On the Mark: Putting the Student Back in Student-Athlete; and Sport in Society: Equal Opportunity or Business as Usual?

 
Melvyn Leffler
Melvyn Leffler

Mentor: Melvyn Leffler, University of Virginia

Fellows: Ariel David Adesnik (2004), Oxford University
The Rebirth of American Democracy Promotion: Carter and Reagan in Central America

Jennifer See (2002), University of California,
Santa Barbara, American Cold War Policy in its Wider International and Domestic Context, 1945–47

Melvyn Leffler is University of Virginia's Edward R. Stettinius Professor of History. He is also a faculty associate of the Miller Center's Governing America in a Global Era (GAGE) program. His area of expertise is diplomatic history, and he has written several books on the topic, including For the Soul of Mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War; The Specter of Communism: The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1917–1953; and The Elusive Quest: America's Pursuit of European Stability and French Security, 1919–1933. He won the 1993 Bancroft Prize for his book, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War.

 
Jeffrey Legro
Jeffrey Legro

Mentor: Jeffrey Legro, University of Virginia

Fellow: Sarah Kreps (2006), Georgetown University

Jeffrey Legro is Chair of the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. In addition, he is the Compton Visiting Professor of World Politics at the Miller Center of Public Affairs and is a faculty associate of the Miller Center's Governing America in a Global Era (GAGE) program. He specializes in international relations and is the author of Rethinking the World: Great Power Strategies and International Order and Cooperation Under Fire: Anglo-German Restraint During World War II. His articles have appeared in International Organization, International Security, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Survival, Parameters, and Foreign Policy.

 
Jack Levy
Jack Levy

Mentor: Jack Levy, Board of Governors' Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University

Fellow: Aaron Rapport (2009), University of Minnesota
Planning in the Shadow of the Future: U.S. Military Interventions and Time Horizons

Jack Levy is Board of Governors' Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, and Senior Associate at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. He is past president of the International Studies Association (2007–08) and of the Peace Science Society (2005–06). He has previously held tenured positions at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Minnesota, and visiting or adjunct positions at Tulane, Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, and NYU. Levy received APSA's Helen Dwight Reid Award (1977) for the best dissertation in International Relations in 1975–76, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Foreign Policy Analysis Section of the International Studies Association (2000). His research focuses primarily on the causes of war, foreign policy decision-making, and qualitative methodology.

 
Jana Lipman
Jana Lipman

Mentor: Jana Lipman, Assistant Professor of History, Tulane University

Fellow: Vanessa Walker (2009), University of Wisconsin at Madison
Ambivalent Allies: Advocates, Diplomats, and the Struggle for an 'American' Human Rights Policy

Jana Lipman is an assistant professor of history at Tulane University. She is a specialist on 20th-century U.S. history, especially foreign relations, social and political history, Cuba and Vietnam.

Lipman is interested in US foreign relations broadly construed to include diplomatic and non-state actors. Her recent work on the US naval base in Guantánamo Bay (GTMO) reorients the field of foreign relations and demonstrates how neocolonialism, empire, and revolution functioned in working people's lives. Through extensive field and archival research in Havana, Santiago de Cuba, and Guantánamo, Cuba, she analyzes how Cuban base employees navigated the politics and contradictions of living in Cuba and working for the US military. Her current research interests include the fields of refugee studies, human rights, and US military bases in the second half of the twentieth century.

 
Ronnie Lipschutz
Ronnie Lipschutz

Mentor: Ronnie Lipschutz, University of California, Santa Cruz

Fellow: Shelley L. Hurt (2003), New School University,
Institutionalizing Food Power: U.S. Foreign Policy, Intellectual Property Rights, and the Agricultural Biotechnology Industry, 1972–1994

Ronnie Lipschutz is Professor of Politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He focuses on globalization's effect on politics. His recent publications include Regulation for the Rest of Us? Globalization, Governmentality, and Global Politics (with James K. Rowe); Global Politics Because People Matter (with Mary Ann Tétreault); "Global Civil Society and Global Governmentality: Or the Search for Politics and the State amidst the Capillaries of Power" in Power and Global Governance; and "Imitations of Empire" in Global Environmental Politics (May 2004).

 
Nancy Maclean
Nancy Maclean

Mentor: Nancy Maclean, Professor of History and African American Studies, Northwestern University

Fellow: Lily Geismer (2009), University of Michigan
Don't Blame Us: Grassroots Liberalism in Massachusetts, 1960-1990

Nancy MacLean is professor of History and African American Studies, Chair of the Department of History, and Faculty Associate of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. She earned her Ph.D. in U.S. History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She specializes in the history of social movements and public policy, with expertise in African-American, women's and labor history. Her current research focuses on the modern women's movement, conservative movement, and the origins of school vouchers. She has written Freedom is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard University Press, 2006) and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (Oxford University Press, 1994). MacLean also co-chairs the Chicago Center for Working Class Studies and serves as senior history adviser to Creating a Community of Scholars, a three-year project in partnership with Evanston Township High School and the Minority Student Achievement Network, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to improve history learning among secondary school students.

 
Cathie Jo Martin
Cathie Jo Martin

Mentor: Cathie Jo Martin, Boston University

Fellows: Gretchen Crosby Sims (2002), Stanford University,
Corporate Social Responsibility and the Political Power of American Business

Jesse Rhodes (2007), University of Virginia

Cathie Jo Martin, Professor of Politics at Boston University, specializes in American politics, political economy, and the relationship between business and politics. She has written three books: Stuck in Neutral: Business and the Politics of Human Capital Investment Policy; Shifting the Burden: the Struggle Over Growth and Corporate Taxation; and Aktivering af arbejdsgiverne: Arbejdsmarkedets svage i Danmark og Storbritannien (Activating Employers). In addition, her articles include "Sectional Parties, Divided Business" in Studies in American Political Development (Fall 2006) and "Corporatism from the Firm Perspective" in British Journal of Political Science (January 2005).

 
David Mayhew
David Mayhew

Mentor: David Mayhew, Yale University

Fellow: Robert Saldin (2006), University of Virginia
War and Peace as Pivot Points in American Politics

David Mayhew is the Sterling Professor of Political Science at Yale University. He focuses on United States legislative behavior, political parties, and policymaking. Among his many publications are Electoral Realignments: A Critique of an American Genre; America's Congress: Actions in the Public Sphere, James Madison through Newt Gingrich; "Congress as Problem Solver" in Promoting the General Welfare: New Perspectives on Government Performance; "Lawmaking and History" in The Macropolitics of Congress; and "Actions in the Public Sphere" in Institutions of American Democracy: The Legislative Branch.

 
James McAllister
James McAllister

Mentor: James McAllister, Associate Professor, Political Science Department, Williams College

Fellow: Brendan Green (2009), Massachussetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Two Concepts of Liberty: American Grand Strategy and the Liberal Tradition

James McAllister is associate professor and chair of the Leadership Studies Program at Williams College, as well as Gaudino Scholar for 2004–06. He earned his Ph.D from Columbia University. He has written No Exit: America and the German Problem 1943–1954 (Cornell University Press, 2002). McAllister's primary interests include American foreign policy, the Cold War, and European politics. He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants, including the Oakley Fellowship (Williams College Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences), the Lyndon Baines Johnson Travel Grant, the John Olin Fellowship, and the Columbia University President's Fellowship. He has served as an article reviewer for Political Science Quarterly, and as a book reviewer for Penn State University Press.

 
Robert McMahon
Robert McMahon

Mentor: Robert McMahon, Ohio State University

Fellow: Robert Rakove (2007), University of Virginia

Robert McMahon is Ohio State University's Ralph D. Mershon Distinguished Professor. He specializes in U.S. foreign relations and has written several books, including The Cold War: A Very Short Introduction; The Limits of Empire: The United States and Southeast Asia since World War II; The Cold War on the Periphery: the United States, India, and Pakistan; and Colonialism and the Cold War: The United States and the Struggle for Indonesian Independence. He also edited Major Problems in the History of the Vietnam War: Documents and Essays, which was part of the "Major Problems in American History Series."
 

 

John McNeill

Mentor: John McNeill, Georgetown University

Fellow: Christopher Jones, University of Pennsylvania
Energy Highways: Canals, Pipes, and Wires Transform the Mid-Atlantic

John McNeill earned a B.A. from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. from Duke University. Since 1985 he has cheerfully served two masters, as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department at Georgetown. From 2003 until 2006 he held the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environmental and International Affairs, until his appointment as University Professor. He teaches world history, environmental history, and international history at Georgetown; and writes books, and directs Ph.D. students, mainly in environmental history.

 
Timothy Meagher
Timothy Meagher

Mentor: Timothy Meagher, Catholic University of America

Fellow: Emily Brunner (2004), University of Chicago
Irish-American Nationalists and the Dilemmas of National Belonging

Timothy Meagher, Associate Professor of History and University Archivist at the Catholic University of America, specializes in American immigrant history, Irish-American history, and Catholic history. He is the author of three books: From Paddy to Studs: Irish-American Communities in the Turn of the Century Era, 1880 to 1920; Inventing Irish America: Generation, Class and Ethnic Identity in a New England City, 1880 to 1928; and A Guide to Irish American History. In addition, he edited The New York Irish with Ronald H. Bayor.

 
R. Shep Melnick
R. Shep Melnick

Mentor: R. Shep Melnick, Boston College

Fellow: Joshua Dunn (2000), University of Virginia,
Judges, Lawyers, and Experts: Law vs. Politics in Missouri vs. Jenkins

R. Shep Melnick is Boston College's Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Professor of American Politics. He researches the judiciary and legislative branches, examining their roles in American government and public policy. His two books are entitled Regulation and the Courts: The Case of the Clean Air Act and Between the Lines: Interpreting Welfare Rights. He has also written many articles and book chapters, including "Courts and Agencies" in Making Policy, Making Law: An Interbranch Perspective and "From Tax-and-Spend to Mandate-and-Sue: Liberalism After the Great Society" in The Great Society and the High Tide of Liberalism.

 
Suzanne Mettler
Suzanne Mettler

Mentor: Suzanne Mettler, Syracuse University

Fellow: Susan Schantz (2000), Brandeis University,
Work, Citizenship, and Welfare: The Institutionalization of the Work Ethic in Work Relief Policies from the New Deal to the Present

Suzanne Mettler is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Syracuse University. She specializes in American political development, public policy, and political behavior. Her first book, Dividing Citizens: Gender and Federalism in New Deal Public Policy won the American Political Science Association's Gladys M. Kammerer Award for the best book on U.S. national policy published in 1998. Soldiers to Citizens: The G.I. Bill and the Making of the Greatest Generation, her second book, also garnered awards: it was the co-winner of the 2006 Gladys M. Kammerer Award and the co-winner of the American Political Association's Greenstone Prize of the Politics and History Section.

 
Sidney Milkis
Sidney Milkis

Mentor: Sidney Milkis, University of Virginia

Fellows: Daniel Galvin (2005), Yale University,
Presidential Party Building in the United States

Saladin Ambar (2007), Rutgers University

Sidney Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. He is also Assistant Director of Academic Programs at the Miller Center of Public Affairs. His research interests include American political development, the presidency, elections, and 20th-century political reform. He has written several publications, including The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal; Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy; Presidential Greatness (co-authored with Marc Landy); and The Great Society and the High Tide of Liberalism (co-authored with Jerome Mileur).

 
Timothy Naftali
Timothy Naftali

Mentor: Timothy Naftali, Nixon Presidential Library and Museum

Fellow: Sean Malloy (2001), University of California, Berkeley
Henry L. Stimson and the American Foreign Policy Tradition

Timothy Naftali is Director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. He was formerly Director of the Miller Center's Presidential Recordings Program and Associate Professor of History. His publications include Khrushchev's Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary (with Aleksandr Fursenko); Blindspot: The Secret History of American Counterterrorism; U.S. Intelligence and the Nazis; The Presidential Recordings: John F. Kennedy, Volumes 1 & 2; and One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958–1964.

 
Alice O'Connor
Alice O'Connor

Mentor: Alice O'Connor, University of California, Santa Barbara

Fellow: Andrew Morris (2001), University of Virginia
Charity, Therapy, and Poverty: Private Social Service in the Era of Public Welfare

Alice O'Connor is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She specializes in modern U.S. history and public policy. Among her many books and articles are Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History; "Poverty Research and Policy for the Post-Welfare Era" in Annual Review of Sociology (August 2000), and "The Ford Foundation and Philanthropic Activism in the 1960s" in Philanthropic Foundations: New Scholarship, New Possibilities. She is also a co-editor of Urban Inequality: Evidence from Four Cities (with Chris Tilly and Lawrence D. Bobo).

 
Carmen Hooker Odom
Carmen Hooker Odom

Mentor: Carmen Hooker Odom, Milbank Memorial Fund

Fellow: Maxine Eichner (2001), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Reinstating Family: Rethinking the Relationship Between the Family and the State

Carmen Hooker Odom is President of the Milbank Memorial Fund, a foundation which conducts health policy research and publishes the Milbank Quarterly. Prior to this position, she was North Carolina's Secretary of Health and Human Services and Adjunct Professor of Health Policy and Administration at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill's School of Public Health. She is a former member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and was the primary author of the 1991 Massachusetts comprehensive health reform legislation and the Children's Medical Security Plan.

 
Charles Palmer
Charles Palmer

Mentor: Charles Palmer, Institute for Social and Economic Development Ventures

Fellow: Andrew Morris (2001), University of Virginia
Charity, Therapy, and Poverty: Private Social Service in the Era of Public Welfare

Charles Palmer is the President of the Institute for Social and Economic Development (ISED) Ventures, a subsidiary of ISED that assists impoverished Americans by providing services such as financial literacy training and credit counseling. He is the former Director of the Iowa Department of Human Services and the former Director of Planning and Allocation for the United Way of Greater Des Moines, Iowa. In addition, he is a consultant with the Annie Casey Foundation and the Millbank Foundation. Palmer has a Masters of Arts in Social Services Administration from the University of Chicago.

 
Charles Payne
Charles Payne

Mentor: Charles Payne, Duke University

Fellow: Joeseph Crepsino (2001), Stanford University
Strategic Accommodation: Civil Rights Opponents in Mississippi and Their Impact on American Racial Politics, 1953–1972

Charles Payne is the Director of African and African-American Studies and the Sally Dalton Robinson Professor of History, African-American Studies, and Sociology at Duke University. He specializes in urban education and educational policy, the Civil Rights Movement, social change, and social inequality. His publications include So Much Reform, So Little Change: The Persistence of Failure in Urban Schools; Teach Freedom: The African American Tradition of Education for Liberation (co-edited with Carol Strickland), and Time Longer Than Rope: A Century of African American Activism (co-edited with Adam Green).

 
Julie Reuben
Julie Reuben

Mentor: Julie Reuben, Harvard University

Fellow: Chris Loss (2004), University of Virginia
From Democracy to Diversity: The Transformation of American Higher Education from World War I through the Cold War

Julie Reuben, Harvard University Professor of Education, researches the purposes of education as well as educational change and the relationship between educational institutions and sociopolitical concerns. Her current research project is a book tentatively titled Campus Revolts: Politics and the American University in the 1960s, in which she will explore the impact of student protests on higher education. She is the author of Making the Modern University: Intellectual Transformation and the Marginalization of Morality, which won the 1997 Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award.

 
Peter Reuter
Peter Reuter

Mentor: Peter Reuter, University of Maryland

Fellow: Beth Freeborn (2002), University of Virginia,
Drug Laws and the Market for Cocaine

Peter Reuter is Professor of Public Policy with a joint appointment in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. He is also the director of the University's Program on the Economics of Crime and Justice Policy and the founder of the RAND Corporation's Drug Policy Research Center. His specialization is policy regarding illicit drugs and organized crime, topics about which he has written extensively. A few of his recent publications include Drug War Heresies: Learning from Other Places, Times, and Vices (co-authored with Robert MacCoun) and Chasing Dirty Money: The Fight Against Money Laundering (co-authored with Edwin Truman).

 
Emily Rosenberg
Emily Rosenberg

Mentor: Emily Rosenberg, Macalester College

Fellow: Seth Center (2006), University of Virginia,
Spreading the American Dream?: Power, Image, and U.S. Diplomacy, 1968–1976

Emily Rosenberg is the DeWitt Wallace Professor of History at Macalester College. Her specialization is U.S. foreign relations, specifically U.S. economic and cultural expansion. She is the author of many publications, including The Day Which Will Live: Pearl Harbor in American Memory; Financial Missionaries to the World: The Politics and Culture of Dollar Diplomacy, 1900–1930, winner of the Ferrell Book Award; "Ordering Others: U.S. Financial Advisers in the Early Twentieth Century" in Haunted by Empire; and "Present and Past: September 11 and Pearl Harbor" in Chronicle of Higher Education (December 4, 2003).

 
Edmund Russell
Edmund Russell

Mentor: Edmund Russell, University of Virginia

Fellows: Shane Hamilton (2004), Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Trucking Country: Food Politics and the Transformation of Rural Life in Postwar America

Sarah T. Phillips (2000), Boston University,
Acres Fit and Unfit: Environmental Liberalism and the American State, 1925–1955

Francesca Ammon (2010), Yale University
Waging War on the Landscape: Demolition and Clearance in Mid-Century America

Edmund Russell is Associate Professor of Science, Technology, and Society in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences with a joint appointment in the History Department. His research interests are the history of science, technology, society, and the environment. He is the author of several works, including War and Nature: Fighting Humans and Insects with Chemicals from World War I to Silent Spring (winner of the Edelstein Prize) and "Evolutionary History: Prospectus for a New Field," Environmental History (April 2003), which won the publication's annual Leopold-Hidy Prize.

 
Carol Sanger
Carol Sanger

Mentor: Carol Sanger, Columbia University

Fellow: Jenny Cheng (2004), University of Michigan
Are Children Citizens?: The Minimum Voting Age and Liberal Democratic Citizenship

Carol Sanger is the Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia University. Her research interests include contracts, family law, gender, regulation of maternal conduct, minors and abortion, and law's relation to culture. Among her recent publications are Gender and Rights (co-edited with Deborah Rhode); "Asserting Rights in the 21st Century" in Gender and Rights; "Consensual Sex and the Limits of Harassment Law" in Directions in Sexual Harassment; and "Leaving Children for Work" in Mother Troubles: Rethinking Contemporary Maternal Dilemmas.

 
Jeffrey Sammons
Jeffrey Sammons

Mentor: Jeffrey Sammons, New York University

Fellow: Damion Thomas (2001), University of California, Los Angeles
"The Good Negroes": African-American Athletes and the Cultural Cold War, 1945–1968

Jeffery Sammons is Professor of History at New York University. He specializes in U.S. social and cultural history, focusing especially on African-American history, sports history, and film history. Currently, he is studying the relationship between sport and the anti-apartheid movement. In addition he is exploring golf as a commentary on race, class, and community. A few of his publications include Beyond the Ring: The Role of Boxing in American Society; "'Race' and Sport: A Critical Examination" in Journal of Sport History (Fall 1994); and "Rebel with a Cause: Muhammad Ali as a Sixties Protest Symbol" in Muhammad Ali: The People's Champ. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Sport and Social Issues.

 
M. Elizabeth Sanders
M. Elizabeth Sanders

Mentor: M. Elizabeth Sanders, Cornell University

Fellow: McGee Young (2002), Syracuse University,
Achieving Access: Understanding the Political Context of Interest Group Participation

M. Elizabeth Sanders is Professor of Government at Cornell University. Her fields of interest are American political development, social movements, economic regulation, the presidency, bureaucracy, foreign policy, monetary politics, and parties and elections. She is the author of the 2000 Greenstone Prize winning book, Roots of Reform; "Work that Counts" in Perestroika; "In Defense of Periodization in American Political Development" in Polity (Summer 2005); and "Congress and Economic Regulation in the Progressive Era" in On Capitol Hill: The Struggle to Reform Congress and Its Consequences, 1948–2000.

 
Michael Schudson
Michael Schudson

Mentor: Michael Schudson, University of California, San Diego

Fellow: Kevin Wallsten (2006), University of California, Berkeley
Political Blogs and the Bloggers Who Blog Them: An Analysis of the Who's, What's and Why's of Political Blogging

Michael Schudson is the University of California, San Diego's Professor of Communication and Adjunct Professor of Sociology. He specializes in the history and sociology of popular culture, cultural memory, American news media, and advertising. He is currently researching the growth of freedom of expression from 1960 to the present and its implications. His recent publications include The Sociology of News; The Good Citizen: A History of American Public Life; and "How People Learn How to Be Civic" in United We Serve: National Service and the Future of Citizenship.

 
Bruce Schulman
Bruce Schulman

Mentor: Bruce Schulman, Boston University

Fellows: Kimberly Phillips-Fein (2003), Columbia University,
The Roots of Reaganism: Business Backlash in the Liberal Age

Margaret Pugh O'Mara (2001), University of Pennsylvania
Cold War Politics and the Roots of the Information Age Metropolis, 1945–1975

Bruce Schulman is Professor of History and American Studies at Boston University. He is the author of several publications, including From Cotton to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South, 1938–1980; Lyndon B. Johnson and American Liberalism; The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, which the New York Times designated a "Notable Book of the Year" in 2001; and "Governing Nature, Nurturing Government: Resource Management and the Development of the American State, 1900–1912" in Journal of Policy History (Fall 2005). Currently, he is working on Reawakened Nation: The Birth of Modern America, 1896–1929, Oxford History of the United States, Volume VIII.

 
Stephen Skowronek
Stephen Skowronek

Mentor: Stephen Skowronek, Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science, Yale University

Fellow: Eric Lomazoff (2009), Harvard University
The Life and Death of the Hydra-Headed Monster: Antebellum Bank Regulation and American State Development, 1781-1836

Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University. He has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and has held the Chair in American Civilization at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. His research concerns American national institutions and American political history. His publications include Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, 1877–1920 (Cambridge University Press, 1982), The Politics Presidents Make: Leadership from John Adams to Bill Clinton (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1997), The Search for American Political Development (Cambridge, 2004, with Karen Orren), and Presidential Leadership in Political Time: Reprise and Reappraisal (University Press of Kansas, 2008). Among other activities, he was co-founder of the journal Studies in American Political Development, which he edited between 1986 and 2007, and he provided the episode structure and thematic content for the PBS miniseries: The American President (Kunhardt Productions).

 
Christopher S. Sellers
Christopher S. Sellers

Mentor: Christopher S. Sellers, State University of New York, Stony Brook

Fellow: Peter Siskind (2000), University of Pennsylvania,
Growing Pains: Political Economy and Place on the Northeast Corridor, 1950s–1970s

Christopher Sellers is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. His research interests include U.S. cultural and environmental history, the history of medicine and the body, and industrial and urban history. Among his many publications are Hazards of the Job: From Industrial Disease to Environmental Health Science and "Environment as a White Issue: Race and Nature in the Suburban Passage of Eugene and Bernice Burnett" in "To Love the Wind and the Rain": African Americans and Environmental History. He is currently writing a book entitled Crabgrass Crucible: Nature, Race, and Class in the Making of American Sprawl.

 
Molly Shanley
Molly Shanley

Mentor: Molly Shanley, Vassar College

Fellow: Maxine Eichner (2001), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Reinstating Family: Rethinking the Relationship Between the Family and the State

Mary L. (Molly) Shanley is the Margaret Stiles Halleck Professor of Political Science at Vassar College. She is the author of two books: Feminism, Marriage, and the Law in Victorian England and Making Babies, Making Families: What Matters Most in a New Age of Reproductive Technology, Adoption, Surrogacy, and Same-Sex and Single Parents' Rights. In addition, she co-edited Feminist Interpretations and Political Theory (with Carole Pateman) and Reconstructing Political Theory: Feminist Essays (with Uma Narayan). She has also written a number of articles which have appeared in Political Theory, Signs, Victorian Studies, Hypatia, and the Columbia Law Review.

 
Adam Sheingate
Adam Sheingate

Mentor: Adam Sheingate, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Johns Hopkins University

Fellow: Gwendoline Alphonso, Cornell University
Progressive & Traditional Family Orders: Parties, Ideologies, and the Development of Social Policy across the 20th Century

Adam Sheingate is associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. He has also held fellowships at Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his doctorate in political science at Yale. Sheingate's specialties are American politics and comparative public policy. His first book, The Rise of the Agricultural Welfare State: Institutions and Interest Group Power in the United States, France, and Japan (Princeton University Press, 2001) was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association. He has also published a number of articles and book chapters on a number of topics, including biotechnology policy in the United States and Europe. Sheingate is currently writing a book on the development of political consulting and its consequences for American democracy titled Building a Business of Politics.

 
R. Drew Smith
R. Drew Smith

Mentor: R. Drew Smith, Case Western Reserve University

Fellow: Larycia Hawkins (2006), University of Oklahoma
Framing the Faith-Based Initiative: Black Church Elites and the Black Policy Agenda

R. Drew Smith is Beamer-Schneider SAGES Fellow in Ethics at Case Western Reserve University. Committed to Case Western's Seminar Approach to General Education and Scholarship (SAGES), in fall 2007 he will design and teach an undergraduate seminar addressing practical ethics. A political scientist and clergyman, he studies religion and public life. A few of his many publications are New Day Begun: African American Churches and Civic Culture in Post-Civil Rights America; Long March Ahead: African American Churches and Public Policy in Post-Civil Rights America; and Freedom's Distant Shores: American Protestants and Post-Colonial Alliances with Africa.

 
Mark Stern
Mark Stern

Mentor: Mark Stern, University of Pennsylvania

Fellow: Alethia Jones (2003), Yale University,
Bootstraps and Beltways: The State's Role in Immigrant Self-Help

Mark Stern is Professor of Social Welfare and History, Co-Director of the Urban Studies Department, and Principal Investigator of the Social Impact of the Arts Project at the University of Pennsylvania. He researches U.S. social history as well as the social impact of the arts. His recent publications include One Nation Divisible: What America Was and What It Is Becoming (co-authored with Michael Katz); Social Welfare: A History of the American Response to Need (co-authored with June Axinn); and "The New African American Inequality," in Journal of American History (June 2005) which was co-authored with Mark Katz and won the Organization of American Historians' Binkley-Stephenson Award.

 
Clarence N. Stone
Clarence N. Stone

Mentor: Clarence N. Stone, University of Maryland

Fellow: Michele Davis (2002), University of Virginia,
Beyond Redistricting: How the Voting Rights Act Has Transformed Democracy in a Southern City

Clarence N. Stone is Professor Emeritus of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. He specializes in American politics, urban affairs, local government, and public policy. One of his publications is Building Civic Capacity: The Politics of Reforming Urban Schools (co-authored with Jeffrey Henig, Bryan Jones, and Carol Pierannunzi), which was named the Best Book in Urban Politics by the Urban Politics Section of the American Political Science Association in 2002. He is the editor of Changing Urban Education.

 
Deborah Stone
Deborah Stone

Mentor: Deborah Stone, Visiting and Research Professor in the Department of Government and the Rockefeller Center, Dartmouth College

Fellow: Christy Chapin, University of Virginia
Ensuring America's Health: Publicly Constructing the Private Health Insurance Industry, 1945-1970

Deborah Stone is visiting and research professor in the Department of Government and the Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth College. She earned her Ph.D. in Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Stone has also served as the David R. Pokross Professor of Law and Social Policy at Brandeis University from 1986 to 1999, and has taught in the undergraduate and graduate programs at MIT, Yale, Tulane, and Duke University. She has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Harvard Law School, Harvard University Program on Ethics and the Professions, the Open Society Institute, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She has served on many government and non-profit advisory commissions, including the Social Security Administration, the Human Genome Commission, and several Institute of Medicine committees. She is also a founding member of the Health Section of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Stone's research focuses on social policy, with an emphasis on health, welfare, and families. In addition to many articles, she has written Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making (W.W. Norton & Co., 2001). In 2000 she received a Mentor Award from the Women's Caucus of the American Political Science Association, as well as the Miriam K. Mills Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Field of Policy Studies.

 
Tom Sugrue
Tom Sugrue

Mentor: Tom Sugrue, University of Pennsylvannia

Fellows: Suleiman Osman (2005), Harvard University
The Birth of Postmodern New York: Gentrification, Post industrialization and Race in South Brooklyn from 1950 to 1980

Nancy A. Banks (2003), Columbia University,
Protecting a Way of Life: The Struggle Over Affirmative Action in the New York City Building Trades, 1961–1976

Tom Sugrue is the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He specializes in 20th-century American politics, urban history, and race relations. His recent publications include The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit; The New Suburban History (co-edited with Kevin M. Kruse); "Driving While Black: The Car and Race Relations in Modern America" on the Automobile in American Life and Society web site; and "Affirmative Action from Below: Civil Rights, the Building Trades, and the Politics of Racial Equality in the North, 1945–1969" in Journal of American History (June 2004).

 
Jeremi Suri
Jeremi Suri

Mentor: Jeremi Suri, Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Fellow: James Wilson (2010), University of Virginia
Bolts from the Blue: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the End of the Cold War

Professor Suri is a child of the global transformations that re-made societies in the last century—war, migration, nation-building, and mobility through higher education. All of his research, writing, and teaching seeks to explain these transformations—their diverse origins, their contradictory contours, and their long-lasting effects. His scholarship is an extended inquiry into the workings of power at local and international levels, and the interactions across these levels. Like other historians, he treats power as contingent, context-dependent, and often quite elusive. Like practitioners of politics, he views power as essential for any meaningful achievement, especially concerning social justice and democratization. Professor Suri’s most recent book, Henry Kissinger and the American Century (Harvard University Press, 2007), explores the contributing factors to Kissinger’s style of diplomacy.

 
Daniel Tichenor
Daniel Tichenor

Mentor: Daniel Tichenor, Rutgers University

Fellows: Rebecca Bohrman (2003), Yale University,
Sifting Immigrants: The Political and Historical Roots of Administrative Failure in the I.N.S.

Daniel Tichenor is Associate Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University with a joint appointment at the Eagleton Institute of Politics. He specializes in executive and legislative politics, social movements, interest groups, immigration and citizenship, public policy, and history and politics. His recent publications include the 2003 winner of the Gladys M. Kammerer Award, Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America; "Organized Interests and American Political Development" in Political Science Quarterly (Winter 2002–2003); and "Immigrants, Markets, and the American State: The Political Economy of U.S. Immigration" in Explaining Migration Policy.

 
Maris A. Vinovskis
Maris A. Vinovskis

Mentor: Maris A. Vinovskis, University of Michigan

Fellows: Patrick McGuinn (2001), University of Virginia
The Institutionalization of Federal Education Policy, 1965–2000

Maris A. Vinovskis is the A.M. and H.P. Bentley Professor of History as well as Professor of Public Policy and Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Political Studies in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He is a 2007–08 Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer, and his topics include American family history, history assessments and elementary and secondary education, history and federal policymaking, the history of federal compensatory programs, and the history of Head Start. Among his recent publications are The Birth of Head Start: Preschool Education Policies in the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations and Revitalizing Federal Education Research and Development.

 

Silvio Waisbord

Mentor: Silvio Waisbord, George Washington University

Fellow: Nicole Hemmer, Columbia University
Messengers of the Right: Media and Modern American Conservatism

Silvio Waisbord is Assistant Professor in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. He is the Editor of the International Journal of Press/Politics. After receiving his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California at San Diego, he was Associate Professor at Rutgers University and was Director of the Journalism Resources Institute. More recently, he was Senior Program Officer at the Academy for Educational Development. He has also been a fellow at the Annenberg School for Communication, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame University, and the Media Studies Center. His current work focuses on journalism, communication and international development, with particular emphasis on health issues and policies. His work on news, politics, media globalization has appeared in a variety of journals and books. He joined GWU in 2007.

 

John Waterbury

Mentor: John Waterbury, American University of Beirut

Fellow: Anne Peters, University of Virginia
Special Relationships, Dollars, and Development: U.S. Foreign Aid and State-Building Egypt, Jordan, South Korea, and Taiwan

Recently, Professor John Waterbury stepped down as the fourteenth president of the American University of Beirut in January 1998 and the first president to reside in Beirut since 1984. Before joining AUB, Waterbury was, for nearly twenty years, professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He specialized in the political economy of the developing countries with a special focus on the Middle East. He was director of Princeton's Center of International Studies and editor of the academic journal World Politics from 1992 to 1998. Waterbury earned his Ph.D. in public law and government at Columbia University in 1968 and went on to the University of Michigan as assistant professor of political science. In 1971 he joined the American Universities Field Staff, a consortium of American Universities, which he represented in Cairo from 1971 to 1977. He was visiting professor at the Universite, Aix-Marseilles III in France (1977–78). Waterbury has published widely on the politics of the Middle East, the political economy of public enterprise, and on the development of international river basins. His latest book, The Nile Basin: National Determinants of Collective Action, was published by Yale University Press in 2002.

 
Margaret M. Weir
Margaret M. Weir

Mentor: Margaret M. Weir, University of California, Berkeley

Fellows: Nicole Mellow (2001), University of Texas, Austin
Rising Partisanship: A Study of the Regional Dimensions of Conflict in the Post-War House of Representatives

Margaret M. Weir is Professor Political Science and Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. She focuses on political sociology, American political development, urban politics and policy, and comparative studies of the welfare state. Her publications include The Social Divide: Political Parties and the Future of Activist Government (editor); Politics and Jobs: The Boundaries of Employment Policy in the United States; and Schooling for All: Class, Race and the Decline of the Democratic Ideal (with Ira Katznelson). Currently, she is researching metropolitan inequalities and city-suburban politics in the United States.

 
James Q. Wilson
James Q. Wilson

Mentor: James Q. Wilson, Pepperdine University

Fellows: Jon Shields (2004), University of Virginia
The Democratic Virtues of Christian Right Activism

James Q. Wilson is the Ronald Reagan Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. He specializes in moral judgment, American government, crime, police behavior, political organizations, crime and human nature, government regulation of business, urban issues, morality and human character, foreign intelligence, political science, and public administration. His recent publications include The Marriage Problem: How Our Culture Has Weakened Families; Moral Judgment; and The Moral Sense. He is the recipient of the James Madison Award (1990), John Gaus Award (1994), and Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Political Science Association (2001).

 

Richard White

Mentor: Richard White, Stanford University

Fellow: Stefan Heumann, University of Pennsylvania
The Tutelary Empire: State- and Nation-Building in the 19th Century U.S.

Richard White, a professor of history, is widely regarded as one of the nation's leading scholars in three related fields: the American West, Native American history and environmental history. He came to Stanford in 1998 and is the author of five books, including The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires and Republic in the Great Lakes Region, 1650–1815, which was named a finalist for the 1992 Pulitzer Prize. Among other honors, he is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship.

 
William C. Wohlforth
William C. Wohlforth

Mentor: William C. Wohlforth, Daniel Webster Professor of Government, Dartmouth College

Fellow: Jonathan Renshon (2010), Harvard University
Fighting for Status: Prestige Motivations and Conflict in World Politics

William C. Wohlforth is the Daniel Webster Professor of Government at Dartmouth College, where he served a three-year term as department chair until 2009. Dr. Wohlforth’s research interests in International Relations Theory, International Security, Russian foreign policy, and the end of the Cold War inform his work as Editor-in-chief of Security Studies and his service on the editorial board of Cambridge Studies in International Relations. Before arriving at Dartmouth in 2000 as Associate Professor of Government, Wohlforth held Assistant Professor posts at Georgetown and Princeton. Recent publications include World Out of Balance: International Relations Theory and the Challenge of American Primacy (Princeton University Press, 2008) with Stephen G. Brooks, and a co-edited volume entitled The Balance of Power in World History (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Dr. Wohlforth earned his B.A. in International Relations from Beloit College, and from Yale University an M.A. in International Relations, and an M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Political Science.

 
Julian Zelizer
Julian Zelizer

Mentor: Julian Zelizer, Princeton University

Fellows: Mary Christina Michelmore (2004), University of Michigan
With the First Penny Paid: Welfare Reform, Tax Policy and Political Change, 1960–1980

Julian Zelizer is Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of On Capitol Hill: The Struggle to Reform Congress and its Consequences, 1948–2000. In addition, he edited New Directions in American Political History; The American Congress; and The Democratic Experiment: New Directions in American Political History (co-edited with Meg Jacobs and William J. Novak). He is a 2007–08 Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer, and his topics include "When Liberals Were Hawks: National Security Politics in the 1950s," "The 2008 Elections in Historical Perspective," "The Death of Détente and the Rise of the Republican Right," and "How Congress Helped End the Vietnam War."

 
Jonathan Zimmerman
Jonathan Zimmerman

Mentor: Jonathan Zimmerman, New York University

Fellows: Tracy Steffes (2003), University of Chicago,
The Creation of the American Education System, 1880–1930

Jonathan Zimmerman is Professor of Education and History as well as Director of the History of Education Program at New York University's Steinhardt School of Education. He has a joint appointment in New York University's Department of History. His research interests are 20th-century history of education, democratic community and education, immigration history, and the influence of schools on development. He is the author of several publications, including Whose America? Culture Wars in the Public Schools; Distilling Democracy: Alcohol Education in America's Public Schools, 1880–1925; and "Ethnics Against Ethnicity: European Immigrants and Foreign-Language Instruction, 1890–1940" in Journal of American History (March 2002).