Miller Center

Colloquium - Polarization in Historical Perspective

William A. Galston, William Kristol
April 25, 2014
12:30PM - 2:00PM (EDT)

William A. Galston
William A. Galston

William Kristol
William Kristol

WILLIAM A. GALSTON holds the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in the Brookings Institution’s Governance Studies Program, where he serves as a senior fellow. A former policy advisor to President Clinton and presidential candidates, Galston is an expert on domestic policy, political campaigns, and elections. His current research focuses on designing a new social contract and the implications of political polarization.

WILLIAM KRISTOL is editor of The Weekly Standard, which, together with Fred Barnes and John Podhoretz, he founded in 1995. Kristol regularly appears on Fox News Sunday and on the Fox News Channel.  Prior to starting The Weekly Standard, Kristol led the Project for the Republican Future and served as chief of staff to Vice President Dan Quayle during the Bush administration and to Secretary of Education William Bennett under President Reagan. Before coming to Washington in 1985, Kristol taught politics at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

Lunch will be served. RSVP required by noon on Wednesday, April 23 to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

This event is part of…

The Polarization in Historical Perspective Series: There is a growing sense today that the American political system is inadequate to the task of addressing the major challenges facing the nation, both foreign and domestic. A growing ideological gap between the political parties – partisan polarization, abetted by the rise of highly ideological interest groups and a balkanized mass media – is routinely cited as a primary cause of the nation’s ills.

Yet, despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of partisan polarization, we know very little about how these developments relate to previous episodes of partisan rancor in American history; how they resonate beyond the Washington beltway; and how they are likely to affect important constituencies, such as Hispanic voters, who are likely to have a profound influence on future party alignments.

This themed colloquia series, organized by the Miller Center's SIDNEY MILKIS, will probe these questions and shed important light on the difficult yet indispensible connection between partisanship and American democracy.

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