Miller Center

Riding The Tiger

“I discovered that being a President is like riding a tiger. A man has to keep on riding or be swallowed.” Harry S. Truman

Friday Feature: Camp David Through the Years

David Eisenhower, a teenager, poses with the

Pictured: President Eisenhower’s grandson David Eisenhower at Camp David in 1960. (Courtesy Eisenhower Library)

As President Obama heads off to Camp David, check out these great photos of past presidents enjoying the Maryland retreat.

From whitehouse.gov:

Camp David, known formally as the Naval Support Facility Thurmont, is the President’s country residence. Located in Catoctin Mountain Park in Frederick County, Maryland, Camp David has offered Presidents an opportunity for solitude and tranquility, as well as an ideal place to host foreign leaders.

Adapted from the federal employee retreat Hi-Catoctin, President Franklin Roosevelt established the residence as USS Shangri La, modeling the new main lodge after the Roosevelt winter vacation home in Warm Springs, Georgia. President Eisenhower subsequently renamed the institution in honor of his grandson David.

Learn more about Camp David from whitehouse.gov.

Friday Feature: Icy July

President Carter riding a toboggan at Camp David, 1978.

As those of us on the east coast continue to trudge through a soppingly muggy July, here's a refreshing image: President Carter on a toboggan (Camp David, 1978).

As we sweat toward August, just try to imagine the crisp air, the flecks of snow on your face, the slew of photographers waiting at the bottom of the hillside...

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Butterfield Reveals Tapes

Transcript by Patrick Garrity, Ken Hughes, Erin Mahan, and Keri Matthews

“Nixon Bugged Own Offices,” the Chicago Tribune marveled on its front page 40 years ago, responding to the astonishing revelation by Alexander P. Butterfield, a little-known White House aide called to testify on July 16, 1973, before the Senate Watergate Committee during a nationally televised hearing. The Secret Service, at President Richard M. Nixon’s behest, had installed a voice-activated recording system that automatically recorded his Oval Office conversations, meaning that the Watergate-era question of “What did the President know and when did he know it?” could be answered objectively. For Nixon, it was the beginning of the end. After he lost a long legal struggle to keep his tapes from Watergate investigators, a transcript of one of them revealed that he had illegally obstructed the FBI’s investigation of the break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate office and apartment complex. Nixon resigned soon after. 

Nixon had some sense of the risks he was taking with the tapes, as is shown by the following transcript of one from the first day of secret recording, Feb. 16, 1971. It comes from a forthcoming collection of transcripts by the Miller Center’s Presidential Recordings Program to be published by Rotunda, the University of Virginia’s digital imprint. It will focus on Nixon’s first week of secret recording. On the first day of it, he resolved firmly: “I will not be transcribed.” 

Click through to read the transcript.

Friday Feature: Teddy Roosevelt Riding the Presidential Moose

President Roosevelt rides atop a large moose which is swimming across a body of water.

When the president rides it, it becomes a presidential moose. Copyright Time Magazine, 1900.

Teddy Roosevelt, well-known as a sportsman later in life, actually started with a frail and sickly childhood. He developed a proclivity for exercise and the "strenuous life" as a teenager. Click through to see a bonus photo of Roosevelt during his time at Harvard... not to ruin the surprise, but the phrase "mutton chops" comes to mind.

Throughout his adult life, Roosevelt was a keen traveller and sportsman. Read more about his unique life in the American President essay.

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight a whimsical item from presidential history.

Friday Feature: Looking back through history

Ethyl Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy take a self-portrait

Earlier this year a special collection of Kennedy memorabilia—owned by David Powers, former special assistant to the President—was auctioned by John McInnis Auctioneers. The collection fetched almost $2 million. See more of the collection.

Pictured in this undated photo (left to right) are Ethyl Kennedy (sister-in-law to the President), Jacqueline Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy.

Interested in learning more about the Kennedy Family? Miller Center scholar Barbara A. Perry has written a compelling and intimate portrait of Rose Kennedy, mother to the President. The book becomes available in July. Learn more about Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch.

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Ich bin ein Berliner!

Today Berlin celebrates the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s iconic “Ich bin ein Berliner" speech, in which he offered American solidarity to the citizens of West Germany nearly two years after communist East Germany divided the city in two by building the Berlin Wall.


“Two thousand years ago the proudest boast was ‘civis Romanus sum.’ Today, in the world of freedom, the proudest boast is ‘Ich bin ein Berliner,’” Kennedy famously stated before a crowd of about 1.1 million Berliners who came out to see him speak in front of the Schöneberg Rathaus.

 

Unlike most presidential speeches which were highly choreographed, JFK fed off of the crowd’s energy on this day in 1963, improvising boldly to declare “I am a Berliner.” In doing so he connected with the exuberant crowd, conveyed his respect for the resiliant city, and delivered one of the most famous presidential speeches in U.S. history.


To watch his speech and read the remarks in full, click here.

G. I. Bill: 69 Years and Going Strong

On this date in 1944 FDR signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, which provided financial aid to veterans for education, housing, and other needs; it eventually became known as the G. I. Bill of Rights.

 

As the Miller Center’s Presidential Classroom exhibit explains, the G.I. Bill gave benefits to returning World War II veterans to help spur the postwar economy. Honorally-discharged veterans could receive unemployment compensation for up to a year, attend college or vocational school, and receive loans to start their own businesses or buy homes.

 

Today, sixty-nine years after it was signed into law, the G.I. Bill is still in existence. You can read and listen to FDR’s vision for the G.I. Bill in this June 28, 1943 Fireside Chat 25.

 

Announcing the Miller Center’s new Historical Presidency Series

“That’s what’s the matter” from the Library of Congress. McClellan separates Lincoln and Davis in a tug of war over a map of the United States.

Beginning this fall, the Miller Center will host a new lecture series based on the Historical Presidency.  The theme for 2013-14 is "The American Presidency and the Crises of the Nineteenth Century."  On September 18 at 5pm, series organizer Gary W. Gallagher (UVa history) will kick things off with Princeton Emeritus Professor James M. McPherson for a conversation about Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. 

Check out the entire 13-14 series here.

Friday Feature: Barack Obama Takes His Best Shot…

President Obama reels in reaction to a missed shot on the basketball court. Enthusiastic kids look on.

President Barack Obama reacts to a missed shot on the White House Basketball Court, April 1, 2013. The President participated in a clinic with kids and professional basketball players as part of the 2013 White House Easter Egg Roll. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Friday Feature: Under Pressure

President Johnson sits at a conference table with his head down.

President Johnson listened to a tape sent by a soldier in Vietnam, Captain Charles Robb, who was the President’s son-in-law. July 1968. Domestic opposition to the war was escalating. 

Leading the free world isn't always bicycle rides and soaking in specialized bathtubs. No doubt, many presidents must feel a great sense of relief when passing the torch to their successors.

As stated by James K. Polk, after leaving office,

"I feel exceedingly relieved that I am now free from all public cares. I am sure I shall be a happier man in my retirement than I have been during the four years I have filled the highest office in the gift of my countrymen. "

And in the American President essay about Benjamin Harrison,

"In 1892, the voters handed [Harrison's challenger, Grover] Cleveland the most decisive presidential victory in twenty years. Harrison told his family he felt as though he had been freed from prison."

How do you think you would deal with the pressure? 

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Remembering Ronald Reagan

Today we remember President Ronald Reagan, who passed away on this day nine years ago at his home in Bel Air, California. The Miller Center houses a robust collection of Reagan oral histories. As the website explains:

In August 2001, with the cooperation of the Reagan Library, the Miller Center began an oral history of key figures in the political life of Ronald Reagan to capture for posterity the words of these individuals who knew Reagan most intimately. Nancy Reagan has observed that the Miller Center "has become a valuable part of our lives as it works closely with the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library to create a definitive oral history of the Reagan presidency."

The project is now completed and includes some forty-five interviews with those most closely involved in Reagan's political career, including Cabinet members, White House staff, and campaign advisors. Among those who have been interviewed are Richard Allen, Frank Carlucci, James Miller, George Shultz, William Webster, and Caspar Weinberger.

As a special supplement to the Reagan Oral History, the Falklands Roundtable was designed to capture the recollections of key participants from the Reagan administration who were involved in the Falklands crisis, including Jeane Kirkpatrick and Caspar Weinberger.

Cleared transcripts were released to the public on January 29, 2006 and are available online. Hard copies of the transcripts are housed at the Miller Center's Scripps Library and Multimedia Archive, and at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. You can read the interviews here.

Friday Feature: Soaking the Tiger

Four workers sit comfortably in an oversized empty bath tub.

Pictured: Four gentlemen in what would become President Taft’s bathtub (before it made its way to the White House).

Did you know? William Howard Taft had an extra-large bathtub installed in the White House during his Presidency (where it remained until a White House renovation). A replica of Taft's tub is on display in the National Archives in Washington D.C.

Click here to see the original order for the bathtub, submitted by the captain of the U.S.S. North Carolina in 1908, and here to see a description in the journal Engineering Review from 1909 (p. 69).

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Presidential Speeches of Memorial Days Past

With Memorial Day weekend upon us, it is an ideal time to look back on presidential speeches of Memorial Days past.

In 1963, LBJ delivered his Memorial Day Remarks at Gettysburg.  “On this hallowed ground, heroic deeds were performed and eloquent words were spoken a century ago,” he began. “We, the living, have not forgotten--and the world will never forget--the deeds or the words of Gettysburg. We honor them now as we join on this Memorial Day of 1963 in a prayer for permanent peace of the world and fulfillment of our hopes for universal freedom and justice.”

Johnson proceeds to challenge the nation to move past racial divides for the greater good of the country. “In this hour, it is not our respective races which are at stake--it is our nation,” he said. “Let those who care for their country come forward, North and South, white and Negro, to lead the way through this moment of challenge and decision.”

Twenty one years later, in his Memorial Day remarks at a ceremony to honor the Vietnam War’s Unknown Soldier, President Reagan also channeled President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. “When he spoke at a ceremony at Gettysburg in 1863, President Lincoln reminded us that through their deeds, the dead had spoken more eloquently for themselves than any of the living ever could, and that we living could only honor them by rededicating ourselves to the cause for which they so willingly gave a last full measure of devotion.”

To watch Reagan's full speech, click here.

Which president delivered your favorite Memorial Day speech?

Friday Feature: Nancy and Ronald Reagan Not Riding a Tiger

Photo Courtesy Ronald Reagan Library, c. 1982. Taken at Rancho Del Cielo, Santa Barbara, CA.

Here on the east coast things have started heating up… could it be true? Is summer on the way?

In honor of the shifting seasons, here are the Reagans doing what many of us are starting to do this time of year (though not quite in the way we normally do it): mowing the grass. The mower was an anniversary present. 

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Friday Feature: The Tiger Goes Riding

How about a little cuteness to wrap up the week? Here's President Clinton with Socks (clearly ready for action).

For more, check out this feature of presidential pets posted by Cute Overload back in February.

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.