Miller Center

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Oct
29
11:00AM
Michael Wolraich

Journalist and historian MICHAEL WOLRAICH writes about historical events in order to illuminate modern politics. He founded the political blog, Dagblog, and has written for the Atlantic, the Daily Beast, CNN, Reuters, and Talking Points Memo. His most recent book, Unreasonable Men: Theodore Roosevelt and the Republican Rebels Who Created Progressive Politics, takes us into the heart of the epic power struggle that created the progressive movement and defined modern American politics. Recounting the fateful clash between the pragmatic Theodore Roosevelt and the radical “Fighting Bob” La Follette of Wisconsin, Wolraich’s narrative reveals how a few Republican insurgents broke the conservative chokehold on Congress and initiated the greatest period of political change in America’s history. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Oct
28
3:30PM

Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment and the Legacy of the Civil War

Elizabeth R. Varon

October 28, 2014, 3:30PM

Elizabeth R. Varon

ELIZABETH VARON is Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History at the University of Virginia. A noted Civil War historian, she is the author of Disunion!: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789–1859; We Mean to be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia; and Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, A Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy, which was deemed one of the "Five best books about the Civil War away from the battlefield" by the Wall Street Journal.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Oct
24
11:30AM

Politics of Disaster

Andrew Morris, Scott Knowles

October 24, 2014, 11:30AM

Andrew Morris Scott Knowles

In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy devastated areas of New York City and the New Jersey Shore. The hurricane marked the latest in a series of natural and human-caused disasters – Hurricane Katrina, the BP oil spill, Fukushima – that rocked the public’s confidence in the response capacities of both government and the private sector. As the two-year anniversary of Sandy approaches, the Miller Center’s GREAT ISSUES program will explore the history of disasters and disaster response policy. Featuring two leading historians in the emerging field of disaster history -- SCOTT KNOWLES, Associate Professor of History and Politics at Drexel University and ANDREW MORRIS, Associate Professor of History at Union College -- the event will probe how experts and policymakers have understood disasters through history and how public policy has changed in response. From this historical perspective, it will explore how future disaster response and recovery efforts might be improved. 

This event is part of…

The Great Issues Series: Under the direction of Miller Center scholar and Associate Professor of Public Policy Guian McKee, the Great Issues program provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Oct
22
11:00AM
Aaron David Miller

For two decades, Aaron David Miller served as an adviser to Republican and Democratic secretaries of state. His latest book, The End of Greatness, takes a journey through presidential history, helping us understand how greatness in the presidency was achieved, why it’s gone, and how we can better come to appreciate the presidents we have rather than be consumed with the ones we want. Miller is both vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. His pieces on the presidency have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Politico, and Foreign Policy.

Oct
21
3:00PM
Ryan Crocker Aaron David Miller Trudy Rubin

RYAN CROCKER, former U.S. ambassador to several of the world’s most troubled hotspots, including Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, serves as the James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center. He holds the diplomatic rank of career ambassador, the U.S. Foreign Service’s highest rank. In 2009, President George W. Bush awarded Crocker the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.  AARON DAVID MILLER is currently vice president for new initiatives and a distinguished scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Miller served at the Department of State as an adviser to Republican and Democratic secretaries of state, where he helped formulate U.S. policy on the Middle East and the Arab-Israel peace process. Photo Credit: Woodrow Wilson Center TRUDY RUBIN, foreign affairs columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, has traveled extensively in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, Israel, and Syria, among other countries. In 2001, she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in commentary for her columns on the Middle East.

Oct
8
11:00AM
Angela E. Stent

ANGELA E. STENT is director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies, and professor of government and foreign service at Georgetown University. She has served as national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the National Intelligence Council (2004-2006) and in the Office of Policy Planning at the U.S. Department of State (1999-2001).  Douglas Blackmon, host of American Forum, will moderate a conversation commemorating the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. As a reporter, Blackmon covered the historic occasion; traveled extensively in East Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary as governments fell in 1989; and returned to cover the first anniversary of German reunification.

Oct
2
12:00PM

American Forum - Big Oil and the Environment

Paul Barrett

October 2, 2014, 12:00PM

Paul Barrett

PAUL BARRETT'S book, Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who'd Stop at Nothing to Win, is the gripping story of one American lawyer’s obsessive crusade—waged at any cost—against Big Oil on behalf of the poor farmers and indigenous tribes of the Amazon rainforest. Steven Donziger, a self-styled social activist and Harvard educated lawyer, signed on to a budding class action lawsuit against multinational Texaco (which later merged with Chevron to become the third-largest corporation in America). The suit sought reparations for the Ecuadorian peasants and tribes people whose lives were affected by decades of oil production near their villages and fields.  During twenty years of legal hostilities in federal courts in Manhattan and remote provincial tribunals in the Ecuadorian jungle, Donziger and Chevron’s lawyers followed fierce no-holds-barred rules. Donziger, a larger-than-life, loud-mouthed showman, proved himself a master orchestrator of the media, Hollywood, and public opinion. He cajoled and coerced Ecuadorian judges on the theory that his noble ends justified any means of persuasion. And in the end, he won an unlikely victory, a $19 billion judgment against Chevon--the biggest environmental damages award in history.  But the company refused to surrender or compromise. Instead, Chevron targeted Donziger personally, and its counter-attack revealed damning evidence of his politicking and manipulation of evidence. Suddenly the verdict, and decades of Donziger’s single-minded pursuit of the case, began to unravel.  

  

Barrett is the author of two other acclaimed books: American Islam: The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion and The Good Black: A True Story of Race in America. He is assistant managing editor of Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and writes for the New York Times Sunday Book Review. 

Sep
24
11:00AM
Vesla M. Weaver

VESLA M. WEAVER serves as assistant professor of political science and African American Studies at Yale. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a Miller Center faculty associate. Weaver is interested in understanding racial inequality in the United States, how state policies shape citizenship, and the political causes and consequences of the U.S. criminal justice system's growth. Her newest book (with Amy Lerman), Arresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control, explores the effects of increasing punishment and surveillance in America on democratic inclusion, particularly for the black urban poor. Weaver is also the co-author of Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America.

Sep
17
11:00AM
Ari Kelman Alan Taylor

ARI KELMAN is the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University. His book, A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek, won the 2014 Bancroft Prize, an award given each year by the trustees of Columbia University for books about diplomacy or the history of the Americas. ALAN TAYLOR is the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor at the University of Virginia. His book, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832, won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for History. His earlier book, William Cooper's Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early Republic, won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for History, in addition to that year’s Bancroft Prize.

Jun
13
9:30AM

Governors Haley Barbour and Evan Bayh, co-chairs of the Miller Center’s Milstein Commission on New Manufacturing, will hold a news conference to release Building a Nation of Makers: Six Ideas to Accelerate the Innovative Capacity of Manufacturing SMEs. This event will be held in Washington, DC, at the National Press Club. Please RSVP to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

Jun
8
1:00PM

American Forum - “Stronger than all the armies”

Bob Moses, Thomas F. Jackson, Robert S. Smith, Risa L. Goluboff, Phil Tiemeyer

June 8, 2014, 1:00PM

Bob Moses Thomas F. Jackson Robert S. Smith Risa L. Goluboff Phil Tiemeyer

Original television broadcast: June 8, 2014

As the 50th anniversary approaches of enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an American Forum special mini-documentary featuring leading scholars from around the U.S. examines how the landmark law ending racial segregation also radically opened new opportunities for women, gays and lesbians, Native Americans, and other ethnicities.  Featuring in-depth interviews with four leading scholars of the civil rights era and American law, this edition first recounts how the Civil Rights Act was passed in the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy despite aggressive opposition from powerful southern white supremacists in Congress and the longest filibuster in U.S. history.  The program also explores how a law originally intended to end legally-mandated racial segregation in the south also became the catalyst--and legal basis--for guaranteeing civil rights and ending discrimination for myriad other groups of Americans, infusing energy into the women's movement, inspiring Hispanics, farm workers, gays and lesbians, and decades later the current quest for legalization of gay marriage.  

Featuring civil rights legend Bob Moses; Thomas F. Jackson, University of North Carolina-Greensboro; Robert S. Smith, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Phil Tiemeyer, Philadelphia University;  Risa L. Goluboff, University of Virginia School of Law; and host Douglas A. Blackmon, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning history Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II.  The episode also explores Supreme Court decisions suggesting trouble ahead for the U.S. law viewed as the most historic of the 20th century.  Before the final vote on the law in 1964, the architect of its passage in the Senate, Illinois Sen. Everett M. Dirksen invoked words of the writer Victor Hugo  to describe the bill's importance: "Stronger than all the armies is an idea whose time has come."  

This special American Forum also kicks off a series of rebroadcasts during summer 2014 marking the 50th anniversary of FREEDOM SUMMER and the peak of the Civil Rights Movement era.  

Click on any of these titles to see those programs:

Todd Purdum: Fifty Years after the 1964 Civil Rights Act

Joseph Peniel: Stokely Carmichael and the Summer that Changed History 

Bob Moses and Julian Bond: Freedom Summer 50 Years Later

Steven Davis and Bill Minutaglio: JFK and the Anger of the 1960s

William Jones: JFK, the March on Washington, and the Breakthrough for Civil Rights

 

 

Jun
3
10:45AM

“Leadership and Metropolitan Areas”
Elizabeth GerberUniversity of Michigan

Leadership and the States
James BattistaUniversity of Buffalo

Jun
3
9:30AM

Domestic Policy Leadership
E. Scott AdlerUniversity of Colorado

Foreign Policy Leadership
Philip PotterUniversity of Michigan

Jun
2
5:11PM

Leadership in American Politics

June 2, 2014 - June 3, 2014

Joint effort between The Miller Center and the Batten School.

Jun
2
4:00PM
Raymond C. Scheppach Bill Leighty

RAYMOND C. SCHEPPACH, professor of the practice of public policy at the U.Va. Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, and former executive director of the National Governors Association, will be joined by BILL LEIGHTY, former chief-of-staff to Governor Mark Warner, for a broad ranging discussion of gubernatorial leadership.

This session is the public keynote to the invitation-only academic conference, “Leadership in American Politics,” led by JEFFERY A. JENKINS, professor and director of graduate studies in the politics department and Miller Center faculty associate, and CRAIG VOLDEN, professor of public policy and politics at the Batten School.

Jun
2
12:30PM

Leadership and the Bureaucracy
John PattyWashington University in St. Louis

“Leadership and the Courts”
Charles Cameron, Princeton University

Leadership: A Provisional Definition
William HowellUniversity of Chicago

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