Miller Center

Recent Events

Click to View Upcoming Miller Center Events

Sep
17
11:00AM
George Packer

The Unwinding is an examination of a nation in crisis. American democracy is beset by a sense of crisis. Seismic shifts during a single generation have created a country of winners and losers, allowing unprecedented freedom while rending the social contract, driving the political system to the verge of breakdown, and setting citizens adrift to find new paths forward. In The Unwinding, George Packer, journalist, novelist, and author of The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq, tells the story of the United States over the past three decades in an original way, with his sharp eye for detail and gift for weaving together complex narratives. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Guillermo Riveros

Sep
11
11:00AM

American Forum - JFK and the Breakthrough for Civil Rights

William P. Jones

September 11, 2013, 11:00AM

William P. Jones

In The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights, William P. Jones argues that the enormous role of the American labor movement in triggering the epic march in August 1963 must be rescued from the shadow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legendary "I Have a Dream" speech. The opening event of the day was a speech delivered by the march’s leader, trade unionist A. Philip Randolph, who first called for a march on Washington in 1941 to press for equal opportunity in employment and the armed forces. Randolph’s egalitarian vision of economic and social citizenship is the strong thread running throughout the full history of the March on Washington movement. Jones’s history delivers a new understanding of this emblematic event and the broader civil rights movement it propelled. A professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Jones is a specialist in civil rights and labor history and contributes to The Nation and other publications. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents

Sep
4
11:00AM
Gilbert King

Gilbert King has written about Supreme Court history and the death penalty for The New York Times and The Washington Post, and is a featured contributor to Smithsonian magazine's history blog, “Past Imperfect,” as well as The Washington Post's “The Root.” His book, The Execution of Willie Francis, was published in 2008. Gilbert’s most recent book is Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. Devil in the Grove draws on never-before-published material about the deadliest case of future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s career. Gilbert is also a photographer whose work has appeared in Glamour and New York Magazine, as well as international editions of Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, and Elle. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Aug
28
11:00AM
Barbara Perry

In her compelling and intimate portrait, presidential historian Barbara Perry captures Rose Kennedy’s essential contributions to the incomparable Kennedy dynasty. This biography—the first to draw on an invaluable cache of Rose’s newly released diaries and letters—unearths the complexities behind the impeccable persona she showed the world. The woman who emerges in these pages is a fascinating character: savvy about her family’s reputation and resilient enough to persevere through the unfathomable tragedies that befell her. Perry is senior fellow and associate professor in the Miller Center’s Presidential Oral History Program and is a well-known scholar of the U.S. Supreme Court and the American presidency. A book signing will follow her Forum. Photo Credit: Robert Capon

Jun
3
10:25AM

Congress and Policy Making in the 21st Century

Jeffery Jenkins, Eric M. Patashnik

June 3, 2013, 10:25AM

Eric M. Patashnik

In recent years the U.S. Congress has been called broken, dysfunctional, and weak, yet its importance as policy-maker remains unchallenged. The role of Congress in the policy-making process has received surprisingly little attention in recent years. Most political science research on Congress focuses on its internal organization and distribution of power, while the public policy literature focuses on the role of presidents, interest groups, and the bureaucracy. What has been Congress's distinctive impact on government's role in key areas such as energy, health care, immigration, and monetary policy?  How have congressional elections and constituency pressures shaped the legislative agenda?  How has Congress responded to major events such as the Great Recession and secular trends such as growing income inequality and demographic change? In an era of partisan polarization, does Congress possess the collective capacity to contribute to effective problem solving?

Co-hosted by Jeff Jenkins, Professor of Politics and Miller Center Faculty Associate, and Eric Patashnik, Professor of Public Policy and Politics at the Batten School, this academic conference brings together leading scholars who will seek to shed new light on how Congress works--and what difference Congress makes for public policy outcomes.

This conference is co-sponsored by the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy.  All sessions are closed to the general public, but proceedings will be webcast live and archived at http://www.millercenter.org.

May
10
12:00PM

Manuscript Review, “One Nation Under God,” by Kevin Kruse

Prof. Darren Dochuk, Prof. Kevin Kruse, Prof. Michael Lienesch, Reihan Salam

May 10, 2013, 12:00PM

Prof. Darren Dochuk Prof. Kevin Kruse Prof. Michael Lienesch Reihan Salam

The intellectual centerpiece of the the Miller Center Fellowship Spring Conference, the manuscript review continues our tradition of considering an important forthcoming book by a leading scholar of history or social science. This year, Princeton University’s Kevin Kruse will present his manuscript One Nation Under God: Corporations, Christianity and the Rise of the Religious Right.  Providing commentary will be a panel that includes Reihan Salam of National Review, Darren Dochuk of Washington University in St. Louis, and Michael Lienesch of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

May
2
5:30PM

American Forum - A Conversation with Ryan Crocker and James Schlesinger

Gerald L Baliles, Ryan Crocker, James R Schlesinger

May 2, 2013, 5:30PM

Gerald L Baliles Ryan Crocker James R Schlesinger

RYAN C. CROCKER, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Afghanistan, and JAMES R. SCHLESINGER, who served as both secretary of defense and energy, will take part in a wide-ranging conversation on foreign affairs covering a broad range of topics including the Middle East and Asia, defense and diplomacy, and the state of American politics.  The session will be moderated by Miller Center director and CEO GERALD L. BALILES, and a question and answer period with the audience will follow.

Ryan C. Crocker is the 2013 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center. He holds the diplomatic rank of career ambassador, the U.S. Foreign Service’s highest rank. He served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012 and U.S. ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009. He previously served as U.S. ambassador to Pakistan from 2004 to 2007; to Syria from 1998 to 2001; to Kuwait from 1994 to 1997; and to Lebanon from 1990 to 1993.

James R. Schlesinger served as secretary of defense under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford and as the nation’s first energy secretary under President Jimmy Carter. He also held leadership roles with the Central Intelligence Agency and the Atomic Energy Commission during a distinguished career in public service. Schlesinger taught economics at U.Va. from 1955 to 1963.

Limited public seating for this event will be available on a first come, first served basis.

May
1
12:00PM
Ryan Crocker Eric Holder

This special program was created using footage from multiple Miller Center events and will air on PBS stations nationwide. Check your local listings. 

Attorney General Eric Holder discusses his plans for the second term, including efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center and conduct trials for accused terrorists.  Ambassador Crocker discusses prospects for stability in Afghanistan after US troops fully withdraw. 

ERIC HOLDER was sworn in as the 82nd attorney general of the United States on February 3, 2009 by Vice President Joe Biden. President Barack Obama announced his intention to nominate Holder on December 1, 2008. In 1997, Holder was named by President Clinton to be the deputy attorney general, the first African-American named to that post. Prior to that, he served as U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia. In 1988, Holder was nominated by President Reagan to become an associate judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. 

RYAN C. CROCKER, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Afghanistan and the 2013 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center. He holds the diplomatic rank of career ambassador, the U.S. Foreign Service’s highest rank. He served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012 and U.S. ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009. He previously served as U.S. ambassador to Pakistan from 2004 to 2007; to Syria from 1998 to 2001; to Kuwait from 1994 to 1997; and to Lebanon from 1990 to 1993.

Apr
29
11:00AM
John Fabian Witt

JOHN FABIAN WITT is professor of law at Yale Law School and author of Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History; Patriots and Cosmopolitans: Hidden Histories of American Law; and the prize-winning book, The Accidental Republic: Crippled Workingmen, Destitute Widows, and the Remaking of American Law. In 2010, Witt was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Before returning to Yale, he taught legal history at Columbia and served as law clerk to Judge Pierre N. Leval on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Apr
19
11:00AM

American Forum - The End of the American Century?

Andrew J. Bacevich

April 19, 2013, 11:00AM

Andrew J. Bacevich

A professor of international relations and history at Boston University, ANDREW J. BACEVICH is the author of Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent WarThe Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism, The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War, and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy. Bacevich has held fellowships at the American Academy in Berlin, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Apr
15
11:00AM
David Cunningham

DAVID CUNNINGHAM is associate professor and chair of sociology at Brandeis University’s Social Justice & Social Policy Program. Cunningham has worked with the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Mississippi Truth Project. His current research focuses on the causes, consequences, and legacy of racial violence. Cunningham’s most recent book, Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan, is the first substantial history of the civil rights-era Ku Klux Klan’s rise and fall. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Apr
12
3:00PM

Please join the family and friends of Professor Ken Thompson to share your memories in the John W. and Rosemary P. Galbraith Forum Room at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, 2201 Old Ivy Road, Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Thompson family invites you to join them at a reception in the Miller Center's Scripps Library immediately following the service. 

Reservations are not necessary for the memorial service; seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend the reception, please respond to Shirley Burke at sburke@virginia.edu or 434.924.6049.

Memorial gifts may be made to the Miller Center Forum Endowment Fund, at the request of the Thompson family, to support an enduring legacy of Mr. Thompson's work.

Information about donating to the Miller Center is at millercenter.org/foundation/millercenterfund. Please designate your gift "in memory of Kenneth Thompson" in the "Special Instructions" box on the online gift form.

Apr
11
3:30PM

The U.S.-Israeli Relationship in a World of Change and Volatility

Ambassador Michael Oren

April 11, 2013, 3:30PM

Ambassador Michael Oren

MICHAEL OREN, Israel’s ambassador to the United States since 2009, meets regularly with officials in the White House, the State Department, and the Pentagon, as well as with members of Congress from both parties. He regularly briefs Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other Israeli leaders on issues vital to the U.S.-Israel alliance. Born in the United States, Oren has served as a visiting professor at Harvard, Yale, and Georgetown, and as a distinguished fellow at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem. His last two books, Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East from 1776 to the Present and Six Days of War, were both New York Times bestsellers. This event is co-sponsored with U.Va.’s Darden School of Business and Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics.

Apr
4
6:00PM

American Forum - Who Stole the American Dream

Hedrick Smith

April 4, 2013, 6:00PM

Hedrick Smith

Television Broadcast: January 5, 2014

Pulitzer Prize winner HEDRICK SMITH’s book, Who Stole the American Dream?, shows how seismic changes, sparked by a sequence of landmark political and economic decisions, have transformed America. Smith examines the accidental beginnings of the 401(k) plan, the major policy changes that began under Jimmy Carter, how the New Economy disrupted America’s engine of shared prosperity, and how America lost the title of “Land of Opportunity.” Who Stole the American Dream? includes conversations with political leaders, CEOs, and middle-class Americans. Smith is also the author of The Russians, which took readers inside the Soviet Union, and The Power Game, which explored Washington's corridors of power. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Apr
1
11:00AM

American Forum - The King Years

Taylor Branch

April 1, 2013, 11:00AM

Taylor Branch

TAYLOR BRANCH is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the acclaimed America in the King Years trilogy, which includes the books Parting the Waters, Pillar of Fire, and At Canaan’s Edge. For his latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement, Branch has identified 18 essential moments from the Civil Rights movement, and providing selections from his trilogy, has placed each moment in historical context. He argues that these events remain crucial for anyone who wishes to understand our divided political climate. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: J. Brough Schamp

Mar
29
12:30PM
Nicole Sackley

NICOLE SACKLEY is associate professor of history and American studies at the University of Richmond. The author of several articles on the history of international development, she is currently completing a book titled Development Fields: American Social Science and the Practice of Development in the Cold War.  During the 2012-2013 academic year, Sackley is a Truman-Kauffman Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Library Institute.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, March 27. 

Mar
28
2:00PM

Beyond the Triangle: Asia and Washington-Beijing-Taipei

Hao Yufan, Dr Harry Harding, Takashi Sekiyama

March 28, 2013, 2:00PM

Hao Yufan Dr Harry Harding Takashi Sekiyama

The triangular relationship of Washington, Beijing, and Taipei forged in the Cold War was a key part of the strategic architecture of Asia. What would be the general effect on Asia of re-imaging the triangle as an inclusive, opportunity-driven interaction? This afternoon seminar will discuss the regional and global implications of rethinking the triangle. Our speakers will present perspectives from Japan and Hong Kong-Macau and provide the basis for a discussion of the general significance of a change from exclusive, security-oriented relationships between the United States, China, and Taiwan.

  • HAO Yufan is dean of the faculty of social sciences and humanities and professor of political science at the University of Macau. His publications include Sino-American Relations: Challenges Ahead (2011), Multiple Development of the Macau Economy (2009), Power of the Moment: America and the World after 9/11 (2002).
  • Takashi SEKIYAMA is director at the Institute for International Cooperation Policy, Meiji University, and research fellow at the Tokyo Foundation.

Session Chair Harry Harding is dean of the University of Virginia’s Batten School and professor of politics and public policy. His publications include The India-China Relationship (2004), A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China (1992), and China’s Second Revolution: Reform after Mao (1987).  

The International Workshop is made possible through the generosity of the following University of Virginia divisions: the East Asia Center, the Miller Center, the Center for International Studies, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the Politics Department.

Mar
28
11:00AM

Rethinking the Triangle: Washington-Beijing-Taipei

Brantly Womack, Leng Tse-Kang, Admiral Joseph W. Prueher, Ren Xiao

March 28, 2013, 11:00AM

Brantly Womack Leng Tse-Kang Admiral Joseph W. Prueher Ren Xiao

Taiwan’s future is with China, not against it. However, no new image of the triangular relationship of Washington, Beijing, and Taipei has replaced the security triangle formed during the Cold War era. This public panel will feature three perspectives from experts from China, Taiwan, and the United States in an attempt to explore a new paradigm for these interrelationships based on inclusiveness and opportunity rather than each hedging against increasingly unlikely crises. It will be chaired by the former commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Command during the Strait Crises of 1995-1996 and later ambassador to China.

  • REN Xiao is director at the Center for the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy and professor of international politics at the Institute of International Studies, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. His publications include New Frontiers of Chinese Foreign Policy (2011), U.S.-China-Japan Triangular Relationship (2002), and New Perspectives on International Relations Theory (2001).
  • LENG Tse-Kang is deputy director and research fellow, Institute of Political Science Academia Sinica and professor of political science, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. He is the author of Dynamics of Local Governance of China during the Reform Era (2010), Globalizing Taipei (2003), and The Taiwan-China Connection (1996).
  • Brantly Womack is the C. K. Yen Chair at the Miller Center and professor of foreign affairs in the department of politics at the University of Virginia. His publications include China Among Unequals (2010), China’s Rise in Historical Perspective (2010), and China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry (2006).

Session Chair Admiral Joseph Prueher was commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, 1996-1999; U.S. ambassador to China, 1999-2001; and James Schlesinger Distinguished Professor, the Miller Center, 2009-2011.

Lunch will be available for persons staying for the afternoon symposium. Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Tuesday, March 26 so we can place an accurate lunch order.

The International Workshop is made possible through the generosity of the following University of Virginia divisions: the East Asia Center, the Miller Center, the Center for International Studies, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the Politics Department.

Mar
27
11:00AM

American Forum - Don’t Stop the Party

Matt Kibbe

March 27, 2013, 11:00AM

Matt Kibbe

MATT KIBBE, president and CEO of FreedomWorks (the most influential tea party organization in the United States) will discuss the rise and future of the movement.  Kibbe is also a national public expert, bestselling author, political commentator, and distinguished senior fellow at the Austrian Economic Center in Vienna. His most recent book is Hostile Takeover: Resisting Centralized Government's Stranglehold on America. Kibbe is coauthor, with Dick Armey, of the New York Times bestseller, Give Us Liberty: A Tea Party Manifesto. He has also written Rules for Patriots: A Pocket Primer for Patriotic Americans. Before joining FreedomWorks, Kibbe served as chief of staff and House Budget Committee associate for U.S. Representative Dan Miller, director of federal budget policy for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and senior economist for the Republican National Committee during Lee Atwater's tenure as chairman. A book signing will follow his Forum.  Photo Credit: Sam Hurd

Mar
25
11:00AM
Henry Wiencek

Television Broadcast: January 12, 2014

HENRY WIENCEK, a nationally prominent historian and writer, is the author of several books, including The Hairstons: An American Family in Black and White, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 1999, and An Imperfect God: George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America. Wiencek’s most recent book, Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves challenges some conventional scholarly analysis of Thomas Jefferson and slavery, based on new information from archaeological work at Monticello and evidence in Jefferson’s papers. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Tom Cogill

Mar
21
6:00PM

American Forum - Ike’s Bluff

Evan Thomas

March 21, 2013, 6:00PM

Evan Thomas

The Gordon and Mary Beth Smyth Forum on American History

Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet, behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As author and former Newsweek editor, Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike's White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. Facing the Soviet Union, China, and his own generals, some of whom believed a first strike was the only means of survival, Eisenhower would make his boldest and riskiest bet yet, one of such enormity that there could be but two outcomes: the survival of the world or its end. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Mar
18
11:00AM

American Forum - Origins of the Era of Unconventional War

Fredrik Logevall

March 18, 2013, 11:00AM

Fredrik Logevall

FREDRIK LOGEVALL is professor of international studies at Cornell University and director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He teaches courses on the history of U.S. diplomacy and foreign policy and the international history of the Cold War and the Vietnam Wars. In his new book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, Logevall traces the path that led France and the United States to lose their way during the Vietnam War. A book signing will follow his Forum.  With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
8
12:30PM
Carol Swain

CAROL SWAIN is professor of political science and professor of law at Vanderbilt University.  Her most recent book is Be the People: A Call to Reclaim America's Faith and Promise. Swain’s highly acclaimed book, Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress, was named one of the seven outstanding academic books of 1994 by Choice magazine; received the 1994 Woodrow Wilson Prize for the best book published in the U.S. on government, politics, or international affairs; the Hardeman Prize for best scholarly work on Congress during 1994-1995; and was the co-winner of the Key Award for the best book published on Southern politics. Her opinion pieces have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times and USA Today. She is a regular contributor to the "Great American Panel" segment on Fox News' Hannity show and has been a regular contributor to CNN's Lou Dobbs Tonight

This event serves as the Miller Center's John and Rosemary Galbraith Immigration Colloquium.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, March 6. 

Mar
4
11:00AM

American Forum - Sources of Terror

Clark McCauley

March 4, 2013, 11:00AM

Clark McCauley

CLARK McCAULEY is professor of sciences and mathematics and co-director of the Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict at Bryn Mawr College. His research interests include the psychology of group identification, group dynamics and intergroup conflict, and the psychological foundations of ethnic conflict and genocide. McCauley is co-author of the recent book, Friction: How Radicalization Happens to Them and Us, which examines how radicalization can lead to political violence in individuals and groups. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
1
12:30PM
Mark P. Bradley

MARK P. BRADLEY is Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of International History and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, which won the Harry J. Benda Prize from the Association for Asian Studies. A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Fulbright-Hays, Bradley is currently completing a book that explores the place of the United States in the global human rights revolutions of the twentieth century. He is also co-authoring a textbook on the international history of the Vietnam wars and serves as a co-editor of the series The United States in the World.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, February 27. 

Page 5 of 103 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 7 >  Last ›

View the full event archive >>