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Mar
21
6:00PM

American Forum - Ike’s Bluff

Evan Thomas

March 21, 2013, 6:00PM

Evan Thomas

The Gordon and Mary Beth Smyth Forum on American History

Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet, behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As author and former Newsweek editor, Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike's White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. Facing the Soviet Union, China, and his own generals, some of whom believed a first strike was the only means of survival, Eisenhower would make his boldest and riskiest bet yet, one of such enormity that there could be but two outcomes: the survival of the world or its end. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Mar
18
11:00AM

American Forum - Origins of the Era of Unconventional War

Fredrik Logevall

March 18, 2013, 11:00AM

Fredrik Logevall

FREDRIK LOGEVALL is professor of international studies at Cornell University and director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He teaches courses on the history of U.S. diplomacy and foreign policy and the international history of the Cold War and the Vietnam Wars. In his new book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, Logevall traces the path that led France and the United States to lose their way during the Vietnam War. A book signing will follow his Forum.  With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
8
12:30PM
Carol Swain

CAROL SWAIN is professor of political science and professor of law at Vanderbilt University.  Her most recent book is Be the People: A Call to Reclaim America's Faith and Promise. Swain’s highly acclaimed book, Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress, was named one of the seven outstanding academic books of 1994 by Choice magazine; received the 1994 Woodrow Wilson Prize for the best book published in the U.S. on government, politics, or international affairs; the Hardeman Prize for best scholarly work on Congress during 1994-1995; and was the co-winner of the Key Award for the best book published on Southern politics. Her opinion pieces have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times and USA Today. She is a regular contributor to the "Great American Panel" segment on Fox News' Hannity show and has been a regular contributor to CNN's Lou Dobbs Tonight

This event serves as the Miller Center's John and Rosemary Galbraith Immigration Colloquium.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, March 6. 

Mar
4
11:00AM

American Forum - Sources of Terror

Clark McCauley

March 4, 2013, 11:00AM

Clark McCauley

CLARK McCAULEY is professor of sciences and mathematics and co-director of the Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict at Bryn Mawr College. His research interests include the psychology of group identification, group dynamics and intergroup conflict, and the psychological foundations of ethnic conflict and genocide. McCauley is co-author of the recent book, Friction: How Radicalization Happens to Them and Us, which examines how radicalization can lead to political violence in individuals and groups. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
1
12:30PM
Mark P. Bradley

MARK P. BRADLEY is Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of International History and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, which won the Harry J. Benda Prize from the Association for Asian Studies. A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Fulbright-Hays, Bradley is currently completing a book that explores the place of the United States in the global human rights revolutions of the twentieth century. He is also co-authoring a textbook on the international history of the Vietnam wars and serves as a co-editor of the series The United States in the World.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, February 27. 

Feb
25
6:00PM

American Forum - Panel Discussion: Restraining the Toll of War and Violence

Severine Autessere, Geoffrey S. Corn, Andrew Gilbert, Ambassador David Scheffer

February 25, 2013, 6:00PM

Severine Autessere Geoffrey S. Corn Andrew Gilbert Ambassador David Scheffer

This Forum brings together expertise in international law, humanitarian relief, diplomacy and military doctrine to explore the efficacy of post war tribunals and other international efforts to repair and reconstruct societies in the aftermath of civil wars and mass violence. With Support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Ambassador DAVID SCHEFFER, an endowed professor, serves as director of the Center for International Human Rights at the Northwestern School of Law. The U.N. Secretary-General's Special Expert on United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials, he was selected by Foreign Policy as one of the "Top Global Thinkers of 2011." Scheffer’s new book, All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals, recounts his own experience working under former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to create the criminal tribunals for the Balkans, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, which resulted in the permanent International Criminal Court.

ANDREW GILBERT is assistant professor of anthropology at McMaster University whose research focuses on the politics of social transformation, international intervention, and the relationship between violence, historical narrative, nationalist mobilization, and state building. Gilbert has been the recipient of an H. F. Guggenheim Foundation research grant.

 SÉVERINE AUTESSERRE is assistant professor of political science at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her recent book, The Trouble with the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peace Building, suggests a new explanation for international peace-building failures in civil wars. The book develops a case study of the international intervention during the Congo’s unsuccessful transition from war to peace and democracy. Autesserre has been awarded two H. F. Guggenheim Foundation research grants.

  GEOFFREY S. CORN is professor of law at the South Texas College of Law where he teaches national security law, the law of armed conflict, comparative terrorism law, international law, and military law for civilian practitioners. Corn spent 22 years as an Army officer and served as the Army’s senior law of war expert in the Office of the Judge Advocate General and Chief of the Law of War Branch in the International Law Division. 

Feb
18
11:00AM

The Elections of 2012

Marian Currinder, David Mayhew, Nicole Mellow, Sidney M. Milkis, Michael Nelson

February 18, 2013, 11:00AM

Marian Currinder David Mayhew Nicole Mellow Sidney M. Milkis Michael Nelson

In a special Presidents' Day event, the Miller Center will host a roundtable discussion of the forthcoming edited volume, The Elections of 2012, due to be published in March 2013.  Participants include the Miller Center's Oral History Program Senior Fellow and Editor Michael Nelson, Rhodes College, as well as chapter authors Nicole Mellow, Williams College; Marian Currinder, Georgetown University; and David Mayhew, Yale University.  The session will be moderated by the Miller Center's Director of Democracy & Governance Studies, Sid Milkis.

Bringing together top-flight scholars to reflect on and analyze all aspects of the 2012 elections, The Elections of 2012 delivers a nuanced breakdown of the outcomes, implications, and consequences of yet another momentous political contest. Whether discussing particular races or taking a broader look at national trends, contributors captivate students with stories and political drama, yet weave in important scholarship and expert analysis. Each selection offers readers historical perspective, as well as a forward look to implications for the political system.

Feb
11
6:00PM
Max Boot

Invisible Armies is a complete global history of guerrilla uprisings through the ages. Beginning with the first insurgencies in the ancient world, MAX BOOT, best-selling author and military advisor in Iraq and Afghanistan, masterfully guides us from the Jewish rebellion against the Roman Empire up through the horrors of the French-Indochina War and the shadowy, post-9/11 battlefields of today. Relying on a diverse cast of unforgettable characters,  Boot questions everything we thought we knew about unconventional combat.

Feb
8
12:30PM
Paul Apostolidis

PAUL APOSTOLIDIS holds the Judge & Mrs. Timothy A. Paul Chair of Political Science at Whitman College. He is author of Breaks in the Chain: What Immigrant Workers Can Teach America about Democracy and Stations of the Cross: Adorno and Christian Right Radio. Apostolidis is currently writing a book on migrant day laborers, popular education, and the “politics of time” in the workers’ center movement in the context of neoliberal capitalism. He is founder and director of Whitman’s nationally recognized community-based research program on “The State of the State for Washington Latinos.” 

This is a co-sponsored Political Theory colloquium.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, February 6. 

Feb
4
6:00PM

American Forum - Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War

Madeleine K. Albright

February 4, 2013, 6:00PM

Madeleine K. Albright

MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT served as the 64th secretary of state of the United States, which at the time made her the highest-ranking woman and the first female in that position in the history of the U.S. government. From 1993 to 1997, Albright served as the U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations and was a member of the president’s Cabinet. Previously, she was a member of President Jimmy Carter’s National Security Council and White House staff and served as chief legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Edmund S. Muskie. For her many years of service, Albright received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, from President Obama. Today, Albright is a professor in the practice of diplomacy at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, chair of Albright Stonebridge Group (a global strategy firm), and chair of Albright Capital Management LLC. She chairs both the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and the Pew Global Attitudes Project and serves on the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Policy Board. Albright is the author of five New York Times bestsellers: her autobiography, Madam Secretary: A Memoir; The Mighty and the Almighty: Reflections on America, God, and World Affairs; Memo to the President: How We Can Restore America’s Reputation and Leadership; Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box; and Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948. A book signing will follow her Forum.  No advance tickets are required, but please plan to arrive early as seating will be limited. Thank you.    Photo Credit: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Jan
28
11:00AM
James T. Patterson

U.Va. Community MLK Celebration

JAMES T. PATTERSON is the Ford Foundation Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University, where he taught for 30 years. His research interests include political, legal, and social history, as well as the history of medicine, race relations, and education. Patterson’s books include Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy, Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to 9/11, Freedom Is Not Enough: The Moynihan Report and America’s Struggle over Black Family Life from LBJ to Obama, and The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Peter Goldberg

Jan
25
12:30PM
Marc R. Rosenblum

MARC R. ROSENBLUM is assistant professor of political science at the University of New Orleans and a specialist in immigration policy at the Congressional Research Service (CRS), where his portfolio includes border security, immigration enforcement, and Homeland Security appropriations. He is the author of The Transnational Politics of U.S. Immigration Policy and co-editor (with Daniel Tichenor) of the Handbook of International Migration. Rosenblum was a senior policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) from 2009 to 2011. In 2008-2009, he served on President-Elect Barack Obama’s Presidential Transition Team Immigration Policy Committee. 

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, January 23.

Jan
24
11:00AM

American Forum - Soldiers in the American Imagination

Kimberley L. Phillips

January 24, 2013, 11:00AM

Kimberley L. Phillips

KIMBERLEY L. PHILLIPS is dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Brooklyn College. Her most recent book, War! What Is It Good For?: Black Freedom Struggles and the U.S. Military From World War II to Iraq, traces African-Americans' campaign for "the right to fight," which forced Harry Truman to issue his 1948 executive order for equality in the armed forces. The book examines how blacks' participation in wars after Truman's order and their struggles for equal citizenship galvanized an antiwar activism that reshaped their struggles for freedom. Phillips considers how federal policies that desegregated the military also maintained racial, gender, and economic inequalities. A book signing will follow her Forum.  With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Jan
22
6:00PM
Douglas Blackmon

**SPECIAL LOCATION: Nau Hall, Room 101**

Directions: http://www.virginia.edu/webmap/ACentralGrounds.html

 As part of U.Va.’s community celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Miller Center’s Douglas Blackmon will be screening Slavery by Another Name, a documentary based on his 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winning book. A panel discussion will follow the screening.

Slavery by Another Name challenges the belief that slavery ended with Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. The documentary recounts how in the years following the Civil War, insidious new forms of forced labor emerged in the American South, keeping hundreds of thousands of African Americans in bondage and trapping them in a brutal system that would persist until the onset of World War II. Based on Blackmon’s research, Slavery by Another Name spans from 1865 to 1945, revealing the interlocking forces in both the South and the North that enabled this “neoslavery” to begin and persist. Using archival photographs and dramatic re-enactments filmed on location in Alabama and Georgia, it tells the forgotten stories of both victims and perpetrators of neoslavery and includes interviews with their descendants living today. The program also features interviews with Blackmon and leading scholars of this period. 

 For more information, please visit http://www.virginia.edu/mlk/Slavery_by_another_name.html.

Jan
18
12:30PM

Colloquium - A Voter’s-Eye View of the 2012 Election

Charles Stewart

January 18, 2013, 12:30PM

Charles Stewart

CHARLES STEWART III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT and co-director of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project. His recent books include the second edition of ­Analyzing Congress and Fighting for the Speakership (with GAGE scholar Jeffery A. Jenkins). Stewart’s current projects include The Measure of American Elections (co-edited with Barry C. Burden) and a study of U.S. Senate elections before the direct election of senators (with Wendy Schiller). He is also the principal investigator of the 2008 and 2012 Survey of the Performance of American Elections, the only large nationwide survey project that has explored the experience of voters on Election Day.   

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, January 16.

Jan
14
6:00PM
John Morton

JOHN MORTON was unanimously confirmed as the director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) by the U.S. Senate in 2009. ICE is the principal investigative arm of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the second-largest investigative agency in the federal government. Prior to his appointment by the president, Morton spent 15 years at the Department of Justice, where he served as assistant U.S. attorney, counsel to the deputy attorney general, and acting deputy assistant attorney general of the criminal division. During his tenure at ICE, Morton has strengthened ICE’s investigative efforts, with a particular emphasis on border crimes, export controls, intellectual property enforcement, and child exploitation. He has also sought to prioritize ICE’s immigration enforcement efforts around the removal of criminal offenders, recent border violators, and those who ignore orders of removal or obtain immigration status by fraud.

Dec
7
12:30PM

Colloquium - A ‘Commitment to Strict Construction’

Sophia Lee

December 7, 2012, 12:30PM

Sophia Lee

The Conservative Workplace Constitution Divides the New Right Coalition

SOPHIA LEE is assistant professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.  Lee is a legal historian whose scholarship synthesizes labor, constitutional, and administrative law. She has written about administrative agencies’ role in shaping constitutional law, civil rights and labor advocates’ challenges to workplace discrimination during the early Cold War, and conservative legal movements in the post-New Deal era. Her publications appear in the Virginia Law Review and Law & History Review. She is currently working on a history of the workplace Constitution from the 1930s to the 1980s.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, December 5.

Dec
7
8:30AM
See Below

The 2012 Mortimer Caplin Conference on the World Economy will bring together representatives from the academy, the government, and the private sector for a serious discussion about the true impact of current immigration provisions on American competitiveness, how proposals for high-skilled admissions can meet the needs of the U.S. economy, what effect such proposals might have on other policy goals (such as encouraging U.S. students to enter STEM fields), how those trade-offs should be managed, and the extent to which specific proposals serve national interests or instead primarily benefit particular industries or employers. 

Unlike other conferences which focus on the relative inefficiency of the legislative process for implementing structural reforms in deeply contested areas, our focus is on rethinking admissions policies for the high skilled.  Are there market-based solutions, legal solutions, and/or political solutions?  Panelists will discuss the efficacy of proposed reforms and will pay close attention to the realities of admission screening and processing as well as to the vulnerability of programs to manipulation and fraud. 

Click here to watch video on the conference web page. 

Dec
3
11:00AM

American Forum - A Melting Pot, or Not: Perspectives on the Immigration Debate

Manuel Pastor, Mark Krikorian

December 3, 2012, 11:00AM

Manuel Pastor Mark Krikorian

MARK KRIKORIAN is executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a Washington, DC-based think tank that promotes stricter immigration standards and enforcement. Frequently testifying before Congress, he has published articles in the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the National Review. He is the author of The New Case Against Immigration: Both Legal and Illegal and How Obama is Transforming America Through Immigration. With the aim of covering diverse views on the immigration debate, Krikorian will be joined by MANUEL PASTOR, professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California, where he also serves as director of USC’s Program for Environmental and Regional Equity and co-director of USC’s Center for the Study of Immigration Integration. He is the author of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future and This Could Be the Start of Something Big: How Social Movements for Regional Equity Are Transforming Metropolitan America.

Nov
30
12:30PM
Matthew Connelly

This colloquium has been cancelled and will be rescheduled at a later date.

MATTHEW CONNELLY is associate professor of history at Columbia University, and director of the Columbia University and London School of Economics MA Program in International and World History. He is the author of A Diplomatic Revolution: Algeria’s Fight for Independence and the Origins of the Post-Cold War Era, which won the 2002 American Historical Association George Louis Beer Prize and the Paul Birdsall Prize in European military and strategic history, 2003 Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and was the co-winner of the 2003 Akira Iriye International History Book Award. 

Nov
29
5:30PM

American Forum - The Most Exclusive Club

Michael Duffy, Nancy Gibbs

November 29, 2012, 5:30PM

Michael Duffy Nancy Gibbs

The Presidents Club: Inside the World’s Most Exclusive Fraternity is the inside story of how presidents from Hoover through Obama worked with—and sometimes, against—each other when they were in and out of power. MICHAEL DUFFY is Time magazine’s Washington bureau chief, where he directs the coverage of presidents, politics, and national affairs for both the magazine and Time.com. NANCY GIBBS is deputy managing editor at Time magazine. Named by the Chicago Tribune as one of the ten best magazine writers in the country, she is the author of more than 130 Time cover stories. Duffy and Gibbs’ first book together was The Preacher and The Presidents: Billy Graham in the White House, published in 2007.   Photo Credit: Javier Sirvent

Nov
19
11:00AM

American Forum - Lives of the Giants: George F. Kennan

John Lewis Gaddis

November 19, 2012, 11:00AM

John Lewis Gaddis

JOHN LEWIS GADDIS is a noted historian of the Cold War and grand strategy, and the author of many books including George F. Kennan: An American Life. Gaddis has been hailed as the "Dean of Cold War Historians" by the New York Times and is currently the Robert A. Lovett Professor of Military and Naval History at Yale University. He is also the official biographer of the seminal 20th century statesman George F. Kennan. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Nov
14
11:00AM

American Forum - From the Dixiecrats to Mitt Romney

Joseph Crespino

November 14, 2012, 11:00AM

Joseph Crespino

Strom Thurmond’s America is an impressive biography of the late South Carolina senator, a one-time Democrat and labor supporter who later switched parties. Emory University historian JOSEPH CRESPINO’s new book captures an important chapter in the history of the GOP providing historical insight into the evolution of the conservative movement that is relevant today.  A book signing will follow his Forum.  Photo Credit: Kay Hinton

Nov
12
11:00AM
Ryan Lizza

RYAN LIZZA is the Washington correspondent for the New Yorker. He covers the 2012 presidential campaign and national politics. Lizza joined the New Yorker after working at the New Republic, where he was a political correspondent from 1998 to 2007, covering the White House and presidential politics. He was formerly a correspondent for GQ and a contributing editor for New York. He has also written for the New York Times, Washington Monthly, and the Atlantic Monthly.

Nov
9
12:30PM
Alan Jacobs

ALAN JACOBS is associate professor in the department of political science at the University of British Columbia.  He specializes in the comparative politics of advanced industrialized democracies and the politics of public policy, with particular emphasis on the welfare state. His first book, Governing for the Long Term: Democracy and the Politics of Investment, was the winner of the APSA award for the Best Book in Comparative Politics; the American Political Science Association award for the Best Book Developing or Applying Qualitative Methods; and the International Political Science Association prize for the Best Book in Comparative Policy and Administration.  

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, November 7.

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