Miller Center

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Apr
15
11:00AM
David Cunningham

DAVID CUNNINGHAM is associate professor and chair of sociology at Brandeis University’s Social Justice & Social Policy Program. Cunningham has worked with the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Mississippi Truth Project. His current research focuses on the causes, consequences, and legacy of racial violence. Cunningham’s most recent book, Klansville, U.S.A.: The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan, is the first substantial history of the civil rights-era Ku Klux Klan’s rise and fall. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Apr
12
3:00PM

Please join the family and friends of Professor Ken Thompson to share your memories in the John W. and Rosemary P. Galbraith Forum Room at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, 2201 Old Ivy Road, Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Thompson family invites you to join them at a reception in the Miller Center's Scripps Library immediately following the service. 

Reservations are not necessary for the memorial service; seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you plan to attend the reception, please respond to Shirley Burke at sburke@virginia.edu or 434.924.6049.

Memorial gifts may be made to the Miller Center Forum Endowment Fund, at the request of the Thompson family, to support an enduring legacy of Mr. Thompson's work.

Information about donating to the Miller Center is at millercenter.org/foundation/millercenterfund. Please designate your gift "in memory of Kenneth Thompson" in the "Special Instructions" box on the online gift form.

Apr
11
3:30PM

The U.S.-Israeli Relationship in a World of Change and Volatility

Ambassador Michael Oren

April 11, 2013, 3:30PM

Ambassador Michael Oren

MICHAEL OREN, Israel’s ambassador to the United States since 2009, meets regularly with officials in the White House, the State Department, and the Pentagon, as well as with members of Congress from both parties. He regularly briefs Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other Israeli leaders on issues vital to the U.S.-Israel alliance. Born in the United States, Oren has served as a visiting professor at Harvard, Yale, and Georgetown, and as a distinguished fellow at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem. His last two books, Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East from 1776 to the Present and Six Days of War, were both New York Times bestsellers. This event is co-sponsored with U.Va.’s Darden School of Business and Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics.

Apr
4
6:00PM

American Forum - Who Stole the American Dream

Hedrick Smith

April 4, 2013, 6:00PM

Hedrick Smith

Television Broadcast: January 5, 2014

Pulitzer Prize winner HEDRICK SMITH’s book, Who Stole the American Dream?, shows how seismic changes, sparked by a sequence of landmark political and economic decisions, have transformed America. Smith examines the accidental beginnings of the 401(k) plan, the major policy changes that began under Jimmy Carter, how the New Economy disrupted America’s engine of shared prosperity, and how America lost the title of “Land of Opportunity.” Who Stole the American Dream? includes conversations with political leaders, CEOs, and middle-class Americans. Smith is also the author of The Russians, which took readers inside the Soviet Union, and The Power Game, which explored Washington's corridors of power. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Apr
1
11:00AM

American Forum - The King Years

Taylor Branch

April 1, 2013, 11:00AM

Taylor Branch

TAYLOR BRANCH is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the acclaimed America in the King Years trilogy, which includes the books Parting the Waters, Pillar of Fire, and At Canaan’s Edge. For his latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement, Branch has identified 18 essential moments from the Civil Rights movement, and providing selections from his trilogy, has placed each moment in historical context. He argues that these events remain crucial for anyone who wishes to understand our divided political climate. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: J. Brough Schamp

Mar
29
12:30PM
Nicole Sackley

NICOLE SACKLEY is associate professor of history and American studies at the University of Richmond. The author of several articles on the history of international development, she is currently completing a book titled Development Fields: American Social Science and the Practice of Development in the Cold War.  During the 2012-2013 academic year, Sackley is a Truman-Kauffman Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Library Institute.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, March 27. 

Mar
28
2:00PM

Beyond the Triangle: Asia and Washington-Beijing-Taipei

Hao Yufan, Dr Harry Harding, Takashi Sekiyama

March 28, 2013, 2:00PM

Hao Yufan Dr Harry Harding Takashi Sekiyama

The triangular relationship of Washington, Beijing, and Taipei forged in the Cold War was a key part of the strategic architecture of Asia. What would be the general effect on Asia of re-imaging the triangle as an inclusive, opportunity-driven interaction? This afternoon seminar will discuss the regional and global implications of rethinking the triangle. Our speakers will present perspectives from Japan and Hong Kong-Macau and provide the basis for a discussion of the general significance of a change from exclusive, security-oriented relationships between the United States, China, and Taiwan.

  • HAO Yufan is dean of the faculty of social sciences and humanities and professor of political science at the University of Macau. His publications include Sino-American Relations: Challenges Ahead (2011), Multiple Development of the Macau Economy (2009), Power of the Moment: America and the World after 9/11 (2002).
  • Takashi SEKIYAMA is director at the Institute for International Cooperation Policy, Meiji University, and research fellow at the Tokyo Foundation.

Session Chair Harry Harding is dean of the University of Virginia’s Batten School and professor of politics and public policy. His publications include The India-China Relationship (2004), A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China (1992), and China’s Second Revolution: Reform after Mao (1987).  

The International Workshop is made possible through the generosity of the following University of Virginia divisions: the East Asia Center, the Miller Center, the Center for International Studies, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the Politics Department.

Mar
28
11:00AM

Rethinking the Triangle: Washington-Beijing-Taipei

Brantly Womack, Leng Tse-Kang, Admiral Joseph W. Prueher, Ren Xiao

March 28, 2013, 11:00AM

Brantly Womack Leng Tse-Kang Admiral Joseph W. Prueher Ren Xiao

Taiwan’s future is with China, not against it. However, no new image of the triangular relationship of Washington, Beijing, and Taipei has replaced the security triangle formed during the Cold War era. This public panel will feature three perspectives from experts from China, Taiwan, and the United States in an attempt to explore a new paradigm for these interrelationships based on inclusiveness and opportunity rather than each hedging against increasingly unlikely crises. It will be chaired by the former commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Command during the Strait Crises of 1995-1996 and later ambassador to China.

  • REN Xiao is director at the Center for the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy and professor of international politics at the Institute of International Studies, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. His publications include New Frontiers of Chinese Foreign Policy (2011), U.S.-China-Japan Triangular Relationship (2002), and New Perspectives on International Relations Theory (2001).
  • LENG Tse-Kang is deputy director and research fellow, Institute of Political Science Academia Sinica and professor of political science, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. He is the author of Dynamics of Local Governance of China during the Reform Era (2010), Globalizing Taipei (2003), and The Taiwan-China Connection (1996).
  • Brantly Womack is the C. K. Yen Chair at the Miller Center and professor of foreign affairs in the department of politics at the University of Virginia. His publications include China Among Unequals (2010), China’s Rise in Historical Perspective (2010), and China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry (2006).

Session Chair Admiral Joseph Prueher was commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, 1996-1999; U.S. ambassador to China, 1999-2001; and James Schlesinger Distinguished Professor, the Miller Center, 2009-2011.

Lunch will be available for persons staying for the afternoon symposium. Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Tuesday, March 26 so we can place an accurate lunch order.

The International Workshop is made possible through the generosity of the following University of Virginia divisions: the East Asia Center, the Miller Center, the Center for International Studies, the College of Arts & Sciences, and the Politics Department.

Mar
27
11:00AM

American Forum - Don’t Stop the Party

Matt Kibbe

March 27, 2013, 11:00AM

Matt Kibbe

MATT KIBBE, president and CEO of FreedomWorks (the most influential tea party organization in the United States) will discuss the rise and future of the movement.  Kibbe is also a national public expert, bestselling author, political commentator, and distinguished senior fellow at the Austrian Economic Center in Vienna. His most recent book is Hostile Takeover: Resisting Centralized Government's Stranglehold on America. Kibbe is coauthor, with Dick Armey, of the New York Times bestseller, Give Us Liberty: A Tea Party Manifesto. He has also written Rules for Patriots: A Pocket Primer for Patriotic Americans. Before joining FreedomWorks, Kibbe served as chief of staff and House Budget Committee associate for U.S. Representative Dan Miller, director of federal budget policy for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and senior economist for the Republican National Committee during Lee Atwater's tenure as chairman. A book signing will follow his Forum.  Photo Credit: Sam Hurd

Mar
25
11:00AM
Henry Wiencek

Television Broadcast: January 12, 2014

HENRY WIENCEK, a nationally prominent historian and writer, is the author of several books, including The Hairstons: An American Family in Black and White, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 1999, and An Imperfect God: George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America. Wiencek’s most recent book, Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves challenges some conventional scholarly analysis of Thomas Jefferson and slavery, based on new information from archaeological work at Monticello and evidence in Jefferson’s papers. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Tom Cogill

Mar
21
6:00PM

American Forum - Ike’s Bluff

Evan Thomas

March 21, 2013, 6:00PM

Evan Thomas

The Gordon and Mary Beth Smyth Forum on American History

Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet, behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As author and former Newsweek editor, Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike's White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. Facing the Soviet Union, China, and his own generals, some of whom believed a first strike was the only means of survival, Eisenhower would make his boldest and riskiest bet yet, one of such enormity that there could be but two outcomes: the survival of the world or its end. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Mar
18
11:00AM

American Forum - Origins of the Era of Unconventional War

Fredrik Logevall

March 18, 2013, 11:00AM

Fredrik Logevall

FREDRIK LOGEVALL is professor of international studies at Cornell University and director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He teaches courses on the history of U.S. diplomacy and foreign policy and the international history of the Cold War and the Vietnam Wars. In his new book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, Logevall traces the path that led France and the United States to lose their way during the Vietnam War. A book signing will follow his Forum.  With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
8
12:30PM
Carol Swain

CAROL SWAIN is professor of political science and professor of law at Vanderbilt University.  Her most recent book is Be the People: A Call to Reclaim America's Faith and Promise. Swain’s highly acclaimed book, Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress, was named one of the seven outstanding academic books of 1994 by Choice magazine; received the 1994 Woodrow Wilson Prize for the best book published in the U.S. on government, politics, or international affairs; the Hardeman Prize for best scholarly work on Congress during 1994-1995; and was the co-winner of the Key Award for the best book published on Southern politics. Her opinion pieces have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times and USA Today. She is a regular contributor to the "Great American Panel" segment on Fox News' Hannity show and has been a regular contributor to CNN's Lou Dobbs Tonight

This event serves as the Miller Center's John and Rosemary Galbraith Immigration Colloquium.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, March 6. 

Mar
4
11:00AM

American Forum - Sources of Terror

Clark McCauley

March 4, 2013, 11:00AM

Clark McCauley

CLARK McCAULEY is professor of sciences and mathematics and co-director of the Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict at Bryn Mawr College. His research interests include the psychology of group identification, group dynamics and intergroup conflict, and the psychological foundations of ethnic conflict and genocide. McCauley is co-author of the recent book, Friction: How Radicalization Happens to Them and Us, which examines how radicalization can lead to political violence in individuals and groups. A book signing will follow his Forum. With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Mar
1
12:30PM
Mark P. Bradley

MARK P. BRADLEY is Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of International History and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, which won the Harry J. Benda Prize from the Association for Asian Studies. A recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Fulbright-Hays, Bradley is currently completing a book that explores the place of the United States in the global human rights revolutions of the twentieth century. He is also co-authoring a textbook on the international history of the Vietnam wars and serves as a co-editor of the series The United States in the World.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, February 27. 

Feb
25
6:00PM

American Forum - Panel Discussion: Restraining the Toll of War and Violence

Severine Autessere, Geoffrey S. Corn, Andrew Gilbert, Ambassador David Scheffer

February 25, 2013, 6:00PM

Severine Autessere Geoffrey S. Corn Andrew Gilbert Ambassador David Scheffer

This Forum brings together expertise in international law, humanitarian relief, diplomacy and military doctrine to explore the efficacy of post war tribunals and other international efforts to repair and reconstruct societies in the aftermath of civil wars and mass violence. With Support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Ambassador DAVID SCHEFFER, an endowed professor, serves as director of the Center for International Human Rights at the Northwestern School of Law. The U.N. Secretary-General's Special Expert on United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials, he was selected by Foreign Policy as one of the "Top Global Thinkers of 2011." Scheffer’s new book, All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals, recounts his own experience working under former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to create the criminal tribunals for the Balkans, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, which resulted in the permanent International Criminal Court.

ANDREW GILBERT is assistant professor of anthropology at McMaster University whose research focuses on the politics of social transformation, international intervention, and the relationship between violence, historical narrative, nationalist mobilization, and state building. Gilbert has been the recipient of an H. F. Guggenheim Foundation research grant.

 SÉVERINE AUTESSERRE is assistant professor of political science at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her recent book, The Trouble with the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peace Building, suggests a new explanation for international peace-building failures in civil wars. The book develops a case study of the international intervention during the Congo’s unsuccessful transition from war to peace and democracy. Autesserre has been awarded two H. F. Guggenheim Foundation research grants.

  GEOFFREY S. CORN is professor of law at the South Texas College of Law where he teaches national security law, the law of armed conflict, comparative terrorism law, international law, and military law for civilian practitioners. Corn spent 22 years as an Army officer and served as the Army’s senior law of war expert in the Office of the Judge Advocate General and Chief of the Law of War Branch in the International Law Division. 

Feb
18
11:00AM

The Elections of 2012

Marian Currinder, David Mayhew, Nicole Mellow, Sidney M. Milkis, Michael Nelson

February 18, 2013, 11:00AM

Marian Currinder David Mayhew Nicole Mellow Sidney M. Milkis Michael Nelson

In a special Presidents' Day event, the Miller Center will host a roundtable discussion of the forthcoming edited volume, The Elections of 2012, due to be published in March 2013.  Participants include the Miller Center's Oral History Program Senior Fellow and Editor Michael Nelson, Rhodes College, as well as chapter authors Nicole Mellow, Williams College; Marian Currinder, Georgetown University; and David Mayhew, Yale University.  The session will be moderated by the Miller Center's Director of Democracy & Governance Studies, Sid Milkis.

Bringing together top-flight scholars to reflect on and analyze all aspects of the 2012 elections, The Elections of 2012 delivers a nuanced breakdown of the outcomes, implications, and consequences of yet another momentous political contest. Whether discussing particular races or taking a broader look at national trends, contributors captivate students with stories and political drama, yet weave in important scholarship and expert analysis. Each selection offers readers historical perspective, as well as a forward look to implications for the political system.

Feb
11
6:00PM
Max Boot

Invisible Armies is a complete global history of guerrilla uprisings through the ages. Beginning with the first insurgencies in the ancient world, MAX BOOT, best-selling author and military advisor in Iraq and Afghanistan, masterfully guides us from the Jewish rebellion against the Roman Empire up through the horrors of the French-Indochina War and the shadowy, post-9/11 battlefields of today. Relying on a diverse cast of unforgettable characters,  Boot questions everything we thought we knew about unconventional combat.

Feb
8
12:30PM
Paul Apostolidis

PAUL APOSTOLIDIS holds the Judge & Mrs. Timothy A. Paul Chair of Political Science at Whitman College. He is author of Breaks in the Chain: What Immigrant Workers Can Teach America about Democracy and Stations of the Cross: Adorno and Christian Right Radio. Apostolidis is currently writing a book on migrant day laborers, popular education, and the “politics of time” in the workers’ center movement in the context of neoliberal capitalism. He is founder and director of Whitman’s nationally recognized community-based research program on “The State of the State for Washington Latinos.” 

This is a co-sponsored Political Theory colloquium.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, February 6. 

Feb
4
6:00PM

American Forum - Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War

Madeleine K. Albright

February 4, 2013, 6:00PM

Madeleine K. Albright

MADELEINE K. ALBRIGHT served as the 64th secretary of state of the United States, which at the time made her the highest-ranking woman and the first female in that position in the history of the U.S. government. From 1993 to 1997, Albright served as the U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations and was a member of the president’s Cabinet. Previously, she was a member of President Jimmy Carter’s National Security Council and White House staff and served as chief legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Edmund S. Muskie. For her many years of service, Albright received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, from President Obama. Today, Albright is a professor in the practice of diplomacy at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, chair of Albright Stonebridge Group (a global strategy firm), and chair of Albright Capital Management LLC. She chairs both the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs and the Pew Global Attitudes Project and serves on the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Policy Board. Albright is the author of five New York Times bestsellers: her autobiography, Madam Secretary: A Memoir; The Mighty and the Almighty: Reflections on America, God, and World Affairs; Memo to the President: How We Can Restore America’s Reputation and Leadership; Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box; and Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948. A book signing will follow her Forum.  No advance tickets are required, but please plan to arrive early as seating will be limited. Thank you.    Photo Credit: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Jan
28
11:00AM
James T. Patterson

U.Va. Community MLK Celebration

JAMES T. PATTERSON is the Ford Foundation Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University, where he taught for 30 years. His research interests include political, legal, and social history, as well as the history of medicine, race relations, and education. Patterson’s books include Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy, Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to 9/11, Freedom Is Not Enough: The Moynihan Report and America’s Struggle over Black Family Life from LBJ to Obama, and The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Peter Goldberg

Jan
25
12:30PM
Marc R. Rosenblum

MARC R. ROSENBLUM is assistant professor of political science at the University of New Orleans and a specialist in immigration policy at the Congressional Research Service (CRS), where his portfolio includes border security, immigration enforcement, and Homeland Security appropriations. He is the author of The Transnational Politics of U.S. Immigration Policy and co-editor (with Daniel Tichenor) of the Handbook of International Migration. Rosenblum was a senior policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) from 2009 to 2011. In 2008-2009, he served on President-Elect Barack Obama’s Presidential Transition Team Immigration Policy Committee. 

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, January 23.

Jan
24
11:00AM

American Forum - Soldiers in the American Imagination

Kimberley L. Phillips

January 24, 2013, 11:00AM

Kimberley L. Phillips

KIMBERLEY L. PHILLIPS is dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Brooklyn College. Her most recent book, War! What Is It Good For?: Black Freedom Struggles and the U.S. Military From World War II to Iraq, traces African-Americans' campaign for "the right to fight," which forced Harry Truman to issue his 1948 executive order for equality in the armed forces. The book examines how blacks' participation in wars after Truman's order and their struggles for equal citizenship galvanized an antiwar activism that reshaped their struggles for freedom. Phillips considers how federal policies that desegregated the military also maintained racial, gender, and economic inequalities. A book signing will follow her Forum.  With support from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation.

Jan
22
6:00PM
Douglas Blackmon

**SPECIAL LOCATION: Nau Hall, Room 101**

Directions: http://www.virginia.edu/webmap/ACentralGrounds.html

 As part of U.Va.’s community celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Miller Center’s Douglas Blackmon will be screening Slavery by Another Name, a documentary based on his 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winning book. A panel discussion will follow the screening.

Slavery by Another Name challenges the belief that slavery ended with Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. The documentary recounts how in the years following the Civil War, insidious new forms of forced labor emerged in the American South, keeping hundreds of thousands of African Americans in bondage and trapping them in a brutal system that would persist until the onset of World War II. Based on Blackmon’s research, Slavery by Another Name spans from 1865 to 1945, revealing the interlocking forces in both the South and the North that enabled this “neoslavery” to begin and persist. Using archival photographs and dramatic re-enactments filmed on location in Alabama and Georgia, it tells the forgotten stories of both victims and perpetrators of neoslavery and includes interviews with their descendants living today. The program also features interviews with Blackmon and leading scholars of this period. 

 For more information, please visit http://www.virginia.edu/mlk/Slavery_by_another_name.html.

Jan
18
12:30PM

Colloquium - A Voter’s-Eye View of the 2012 Election

Charles Stewart

January 18, 2013, 12:30PM

Charles Stewart

CHARLES STEWART III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT and co-director of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project. His recent books include the second edition of ­Analyzing Congress and Fighting for the Speakership (with GAGE scholar Jeffery A. Jenkins). Stewart’s current projects include The Measure of American Elections (co-edited with Barry C. Burden) and a study of U.S. Senate elections before the direct election of senators (with Wendy Schiller). He is also the principal investigator of the 2008 and 2012 Survey of the Performance of American Elections, the only large nationwide survey project that has explored the experience of voters on Election Day.   

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, January 16.

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