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Jan
23
3:00PM
Eric Holder

Airs on Public Television: April 20, 2014

Check your local listings for specific channels and times

Attorney General Eric H. Holder discloses a dramatic new effort shorten the prison sentences of thousands of federal prisoners who received draconian sentences at the height of the drug war, regulatory changes to accommodate the new legalization of marijuana sales in Colorado and Washington state, the TSA controversy and Edward Snowden, partisan politics, civil rights, and race in America.

Eric H. Holder was sworn in as the 82nd attorney general of the United States on February 3, 2009 by Vice President Joe Biden. In 1997, Holder was named by President Clinton to be the deputy attorney general, the first African-American named to that post. Prior to that, he served as U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia. In 1988, Holder was nominated by President Reagan to become an associate judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. While in law school, he clerked at the N.A.A.C.P. the Legal Defense Fund, and the Department of Justice's Criminal Division. Upon graduating, he moved to Washington and joined the Department of Justice as part of the Attorney General's Honors Program. He was assigned to the newly formed Public Integrity Section in 1976 and was tasked to investigate and prosecute official corruption on the local, state, and federal levels. Prior to becoming Attorney General, Holder was a litigation partner at Covington & Burling LLP in Washington.

Jan
8
11:00AM

American Forum - Double Down: Game Change 2012

John Heilemann, Mark Halperin

January 8, 2014, 11:00AM

John Heilemann Mark Halperin

MARK HALPERIN and JOHN HEILEMANN, authors of Game Change -- the bestselling chronicle of the historic 2008 presidential election discuss their inside account of the 2012 campaign--Double Down, the battle ahead in 2014 and the future of American politics.  In Game Change, they captured the full drama of Barack Obama’s victory over the Clintons, John McCain, and Sarah Palin. The new book, Double Down, picks up the story in the Oval Office, where President Obama is beset by crises inherited, unforeseen and of his own creation. Halperin, who has covered seven presidential elections, is an editor at large and a senior political analyst for Time magazine, and a senior political analyst for MSNBC. An award-winning journalist and author of Pride Before the Fall, Heilemann is the national affairs editor for New York magazine and a political analyst for MSNBC.

Dec
6
12:30PM

Colloquium - The Future of U.S. Health Care

Rick Mayes, Raymond C Scheppach

December 6, 2013, 12:30PM

Rick Mayes Raymond C Scheppach

‘Obamacare,’ Medicare Payment Policy, and the Elusive Quest for Better Incentive Alignment

RICK MAYES is associate professor in the department of political science, and co-director of the "Healthcare & Society" major, at the University of Richmond.  Mayes received his Ph.D. from UVa in 2000 and was a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral trainee at U.C. Berkeley’s School of Public Health from 2000 to 2002.  From 1992-1993, he worked on Medicaid policy in the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs for George H.W. Bush and thereafter on health insurance and Medicare policy at the AARP during the health care reform effort of 1993-94.  Mayes is author of Universal Coverage: The Elusive Quest for National Health Insurance, and co-author of Medicare Prospective Payment and the Shaping of U.S. Health Care and Medicating Children: ADHD and Pediatric Mental Health.

Mayes’ presentation will focus on disconcerting long-term health care cost trends and related major developments facing health care providers, payers and patients. Particular attention will be devoted to how and why Medicare payment policy has played such an influential political and financial role in the structure of modern medicine. The talk will conclude with an analysis of how both the ACA and Medicare's governance are accelerating the reshaping of health care organization, finance and delivery for all Americans (not just senior citizens).

RAY SCHEPPACHSenior Fellow for Economic Policy at the Miller Center, will offer comments.

This colloquium is part of the Fall 2013 Miller Center Colloquium series, Historical Perspectives on the Health Care Crisis, organized by GUIAN MCKEE, Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Miller Center.   Support for the series comes from the Claude Moore Foundation.

 
Dec
4
11:00AM

American Forum - Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time

Professor Ira Katznelson

December 4, 2013, 11:00AM

Professor Ira Katznelson

Political scientist and historian IRA KATZNELSON is noted for his research on the liberal state, inequality, social knowledge, and institutions, primarily focused on the United States. In his most recent book, Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time, he asserts that during the 1930s and 1940s, American democracy was rescued yet distorted by a unified band of Southern lawmakers who safeguarded racial segregation as they built a new national state to manage capitalism and assert global power. Katznelson has taught at Columbia University, the University of Chicago, and the New School for Social Research. He is currently Ruggles Professor of Political Science and History at Columbia. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Dec
2
6:00PM

Moderator

John Harwood, Chief Washington Correspondent, CNBC

Panelists

Clayton Yeutter, former United States Trade Representative, 1985-1989

Mickey Kantor, former United States Trade Representative, 1993-1996

Susan Schwab, former United States Trade Representative, 2006-2009

Ron Kirk, former United States Trade Representative, 2009-2013

Dec
2
4:00PM

The creation of a US-EU trade bloc has been touted as the means to re-establish US economic leadership and dominance in the world. While session 2 explores whether this is likely, this session explores the possible implications of the creation of this set of bilateral relationships. Panelists will reflect on a set of questions related to the potential consequences of a successful implementation of the TTIP including:

  • Will increased trade and investment between the United States and the EU lead to the creation of competitive trade blocs in other parts of the world?
  • Will the creation of the TTIP mean that the WTO become irrelevant?
  • What about China? How does TTIP—and potentially the creation of the Trans-Pacific Treaty—isolate China and, if so, what are the consequences?
Dec
2
2:30PM

The economic malaise that began with the 2007 global recession has slowed yet the economic growth that is occurring within the United States is both lower than hoped and the recovery is essentially jobless. Advocates of the TTIP propose that expanding the trade and investment relationship with the EU has the potential to dramatically increase productivity, manufacturing, and, ultimately employment. Yet these expectations may be based on some very optimistic assumptions. Panelists on this session will evaluate these assumptions and will address the following questions:

  • To what extent would an expansion of trade and investment with the European Union lead to job-creating economic expansion in both the United States and the European Union?
  • Which economic sectors in the US are best positioned to gain from TTIP? Which sectors are likely to lose?
Dec
2
12:30PM

The United States has historically been involved in a large number of military, political and economic relationships that span the globe. Yet while the United States and Europe have yet to realize a fully open market for trade and investment. This session will explore the causes and consequences of economic agreements both historically and across different partners. Panelists will address a number of questions including:

  • What are the political and economic pre-requisites to a fully functioning trade and investment treaty?
  • Are there similarities/differences between the proposed TTIP and other trade agreements (e.g., the Trans-Pacific Partnership)?
  • How have domestic content restrictions and intellectual property concerns been dealt with in other agreements?
Dec
2
8:00AM

This is a two part conference. Part 1 was held on December 2, 2013 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. The second part takes place May 2, 2014 at the Europa Institute in Edinburgh.

Nov
20
11:00AM
Peter Baker

In Days of Fire, Peter Baker, senior White House correspondent for The New York Times, takes us on a journey through the eight years of the Bush-Cheney administration in a narrative of a dramatic and controversial presidency. Theirs was the most captivating American political partnership since Nixon and Kissinger, a bold and untested president and his seasoned, relentless vice president. Confronted by one crisis after another, they struggled to protect the country, remake the world, and define their own relationship along the way. In Days of Fire, Baker chronicles the history of the most consequential presidency in modern times through the prism of its two most compelling characters. He brings to life with in-the-room immediacy all the drama of an era marked by devastating terror attacks, the Iraq war, Hurricane Katrina and financial collapse. A book signing will follow his Forum.

Nov
16
3:45PM

Conference - Concluding Roundtable: Inclusiveness as Reality and Strategy

Chas W Freeman, Da Wei, Dr Harry Harding, Wang Jenn-Hwan

November 16, 2013, 3:45PM

Chas W Freeman Da Wei Dr Harry Harding Wang Jenn-Hwan

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Click here during the event to watch live. 

Nov
16
2:45PM

Conference - Panel Six: Other Triangles

Leonard J Schoppa, Robert Stolz, Ren Xiao

November 16, 2013, 2:45PM

Ren Xiao

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
16
1:00PM

Conference - Panel Five: Security Beyond the Security Triangle: Can Security be Inclusive?

Da Wei, Allen C. Lynch, Robert Sutter, Yuan-Kang Wang

November 16, 2013, 1:00PM

Da Wei Allen C. Lynch Robert Sutter Yuan-Kang Wang

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
16
10:00AM

Conference - Panel Four: Using the Triangle

Chuang Yi-Chyi, Dennis Yang, Shirley Lin, Shu-Heng Chen

November 16, 2013, 10:00AM

Chuang Yi-Chyi Dennis Yang Shirley Lin Shu-Heng Chen

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
16
9:30AM

Conference - Inclusive Triangularity

Chas W Freeman

November 16, 2013, 9:30AM

Chas W Freeman

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
4:15PM

Conference - Concluding Observations

Dr Harry Harding

November 15, 2013, 4:15PM

Dr Harry Harding

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
2:45PM

Conference - Panel Three: The Shared Future of East Asia

John Echeverri-Gent, Lyle Goldstein, Tang Ching-Ping, Yong Cai

November 15, 2013, 2:45PM

John Echeverri-Gent Lyle Goldstein Tang Ching-Ping Yong Cai

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
1:00PM

Conference - Panel Two: Challenges of Inclusive Integration

Ekaterina Makarova, Hao Yufan, Leng Tse-Kang, Wang Jenn-Hwan

November 15, 2013, 1:00PM

Ekaterina Makarova Hao Yufan Leng Tse-Kang Wang Jenn-Hwan

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
10:15AM

Conference - Panel One: Taiwan, China, and Asia: Inclusive Identities?

Fred Damon, John Fuh-Sheng Hsieh, John Shepherd

November 15, 2013, 10:15AM

Fred Damon John Fuh-Sheng Hsieh John Shepherd

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
9:00AM

Conference - Dynamics of Inclusiveness

Gerald L Baliles, Brantly Womack, Dr Harry Harding

November 15, 2013, 9:00AM

Gerald L Baliles Brantly Womack Dr Harry Harding

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
13
11:00AM

American Forum - Surrender at Appomattox: What did it really mean?

Elizabeth R. Varon

November 13, 2013, 11:00AM

Elizabeth R. Varon

Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a highly gratifying image in the popular mind: it was, many believe, a moment that transcended politics, a moment of healing, a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But as Elizabeth R. Varon reveals in this vividly narrated history, this rosy image conceals a seething debate over precisely what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. The combatants in that debate included the iconic Lee and Grant, but they also included a cast of characters previously overlooked, who brought their own understanding of the war's causes, consequences, and meaning. Varon is Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History at the University of Virginia. A noted Civil War historian, she is the author of Disunion!: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789–1859; We Mean to be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia; and Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, A Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy, which was named one of the "Five Best" books on the "Civil War away from the battlefield" by the Wall Street Journal. A book signing will follow her Forum.

Nov
11
3:15PM

Conference - Lessons Learned: State-Building in Afghanistan

Hilda Arellano, Ryan Crocker, Elizabeth Field, Robin Lynn Raphel

November 11, 2013, 3:15PM

Hilda Arellano Ryan Crocker Elizabeth Field Robin Lynn Raphel

The 2013 Ambassador William C. Battle Symposium on American Diplomacy

A roundtable of eminent scholars and distinguished public officials will explore the lessons American policy-makers, national security officials, diplomats and public opinion leaders have drawn -- and should draw -- from the United States’ decade-long experience of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. What can we learn from the American effort at state-building? Where did we succeed? Where did we fail? And what do we now know about the strengths and the limitations of our state-building capabilities? 

 

 

Nov
11
1:30PM

Conference - Lessons Learned: State-Building in Iraq

Stuart W. Bowen, Seth Center, Ryan Crocker, James Savage

November 11, 2013, 1:30PM

Stuart W. Bowen Seth Center Ryan Crocker James Savage

The 2013 Ambassador William C. Battle Symposium on American Diplomacy

A roundtable of eminent scholars and distinguished public officials will explore the lessons American policy-makers, national security officials, diplomats and public opinion leaders have drawn -- and should draw -- from the United States’ decade-long experience of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. What can we learn from the American effort at state-building? Where did we succeed? Where did we fail? And what do we now know about the strengths and the limitations of our state-building capabilities? 

 

 

Nov
8
3:30PM

Andrew Jackson and the Troubled Birth of Democracy

Henry William Brands

November 8, 2013, 3:30PM

Henry William Brands

HENRY WILLIAM (H.W.) BRANDS sold cutlery across the American West before earning graduate degrees in mathematics and history in Oregon and Texas. He taught at Vanderbilt University and Texas A&M University before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History. His books on American history and politics include The Man Who Saved the Union, Traitor to His Class, Andrew Jackson, The Age of Gold, The First American, and TR. Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. 

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Oct
25
12:30PM

Colloquium - There’s No Place Like Home

Jennifer Klein

October 25, 2013, 12:30PM

Jennifer Klein

Long-Term Care and the Growth of Low-Wage Labor in the U.S. Welfare State

Yale History Professor JENNIFER KLEIN will discuss the emergence of home-care work as a critical part of the U.S. health-care system and welfare state. Klein will explain how the public and private sectors interacted to turn home care into a low-wage job at the lowest rungs of the American medical system – a job that was often stigmatized through both its long association with the labor of poor women of color and its more recent links to welfare-to-work programs. Yet Klein will also show how home care has emerged as a dynamic part of the American labor movement in recent decades. 

  • Introduction from Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (Oxford University Press, 2012)
  • Chapter 6: The Union is Us from Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (Oxford University Press, 2012)

JENNIFER KLEIN is professor of history at Yale University. She earned her Ph.D. at U.Va. and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation fellow in Health Policy.  Klein’s publications include Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State, co-authored with Eileen Boris, which was awarded the Sara A. Whaley Book Prize from the National Women’s Studies Association; and For All These Rights: Business, Labor, and the Shaping of America’s Public-Private Welfare State, which was awarded the Ellis W. Hawley Prize in Political History/Political Economy from the Organization of American Historians and the Hagley Prize in Business History from the Business History Conference.

This colloquium is part of the Fall 2013 Miller Center Colloquium Series, Historical Perspectives on the Health Care Crisis, organized by GUIAN MCKEE, associate professor of public policy at the Miller Center.  Support for the series comes from the Claude Moore Foundation.

This event will be live-streamed and archived, and lunch will be served.  Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, October 23.

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