Miller Center

Recent Events

Click to View Upcoming Miller Center Events

Oct
26
11:00AM

American Forum - The View from the White House

Peter Baker

October 26, 2015, 11:00AM

Peter Baker

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Nov. 22, 2015/Nationally, Nov. 25, 2015

Peter Baker is the chief White House correspondent for the New York Times. He has covered three presidents for the Times and the Washington Post, winning the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency and the Aldo Beckman Memorial Award for White House coverage. Baker has covered some of the most dramatic political issues and scandals in American history, including the Clinton administration’s Monica Lewinsky scandal, as well as the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, Supreme Court nominations, and the American economy. He has also covered decades of major international stories, including the rise of Vladimir Putin and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A best-selling author, Baker’s books include Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House, The Breach: Inside the Impeachment and Trial of William Jefferson Clinton, and Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the End of Revolution.

Oct
21
11:00AM
Cokie Roberts

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia,  November 8, 2015/ Nationally,  Nov. 11, 2015

Cokie Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News and NPR. She has won countless awards and in 2008 was named a “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers We are Our Mothers’ Daughters; Founding Mothers: Ladies of Liberty; and, with her husband, the journalist Steven V. Roberts, From This Day Forward and Our Haggadah. Photo Credit: Randy Sager, American Broadcasting Companies, Inc.

Oct
19
12:30PM

The Moynihan Report after Fifty Years: the Controversy and its Legacy

Daniel Geary, Daryl Scott

October 19, 2015, 12:30PM

Daniel GearyDaryl Scott

On the 50th anniversary of Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s controversial study, The Negro Family: A Case for National Action, the Miller Center’s Great Issues program will explore the report and its ongoing legacy for debates about race and economic inequality in the United States. Although conceived by Moynihan as an attempt to probe connections between racial inequality, economic injustice, and family structure, the report touched off a heated debate over its contention that households headed by single mothers constrained African American social and economic progress. The debate over the Moynihan report remains relevant today, as political leaders ranging from Paul Ryan to Barack Obama have recently referred to the report and its conclusions. On October 19, Daniel Geary and Daryl Scott, two leading scholars, will examine this debate, its history, and its implications for discussions of race today.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Oct
14
11:00AM

American Forum - SPECTACLE: The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga

Pamela Newkirk

October 14, 2015, 11:00AM

Pamela Newkirk

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Nov. 15, 2015/National, Nov. 18, 2015

Award-winning scholar and journalist Pamela Newkirk reveals a little-known and shameful episode in American history, when an African man was displayed as an exhibit in the Museum of Natural History and the Bronx Zoo. SPECTACLE is a shocking story of racial prejudice, science, and tragedy in the early years of the Twentieth century—and also a critical episode for understanding why even in 2015 many Americans still see issues of race in profoundly different ways. Ms. Newkirk is a journalist and a professor of journalism, and a director of undergraduate studies at New York University. She is the author of Within the Veil: Black Journalists, White Media, which won the National Press Club Award for Media Criticism, and the editor of Letters from Black AmericaPhoto credit: Joe Henson

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Oct
7
11:00AM
Joy-Ann Reid

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, Nov. 1, 2015/ Nationally, Nov. 4, 2015

Joy-Ann Reid is a national correspondent for MSNBC and previous host of MSNBC's The Reid Report - a daily program that offered distinctive analysis and insight on the day’s news. In her new book, Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide,  Ms. Reid traces the Democratic Party back to the early 1960s in order to demonstrate the role of race in major party decisions and to explain why the issue is so important to understanding American politics today.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Oct
2
1:00PM

Media, Technology, and Partisanship

Doug Blackmon, Jamelle Bouie, Nicole Hemmer, Brian Balogh

October 2, 2015, 1:00PM

Doug BlackmonJamelle BouieNicole HemmerBrian Balogh

“Seeing Beyond the Partisan Divide” is a two day symposium and workshop gathering scholars and graduate students from different disciplines and institutions to push scholarly inquiry – and ultimately engaged citizens and media through a published volume – to explore political history and political institutions from angles that challenge or transcend our hyper-polarized understandings of American politics and democracy. This conference is generously supported by the Miller Center, the Page-Barbour Interdisciplinary Initiatives Committee, the University of Virginia, and the American Political History Institute at Boston University.

This conversation is the public session of "Seeing Beyond the Partisan Divide" and will explore the media's role in shaping and, ultimately, perhaps, transcending our polarized political, social, and democratic landscape. Doug Blackmon is a Pulitzer-Prize winning author, journalist, and executive producer and host of the Miller Center's American Forum program. Previously, he worked at both The Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at Slate.com whose writing has appeared either online or in print at The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, BookForum, TheWashington Post, Democracy Journal, and TIME. The Miller Center's Nicole Hemmer is a historian who writes a weekly column about politics and history for U.S. News & World Report. Her book Messengers of the Right, a history of conservative media in the United States, will be published in Penn Press’s series, Politics and Culture in Modern America, in Spring 2016. The conversation will be moderated by Brian Balogh, Compton Professor at the Miller Center and professor of history in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia.

Oct
2
10:00AM
Jamelle Bouie

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 20, 2015/Nationally December 23, 2015

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at Slate.com whose writing has appeared either online or in print at The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, BookForum, The Washington Post, Democracy Journal, and TIME.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Sep
30
11:00AM

American Forum - Where Does the U.S.-Iran Nuclear Deal Go Now?

Karim Sadjadpour, Michael Singh

September 30, 2015, 11:00AM

Karim SadjadpourMichael Singh

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, Oct. 25, 2015/Nationally, Oct. 28, 2015

Karim Sadjadpour, an associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, has served as the chief Iran analyst at the International Crisis Group based in Tehran and Washington, D.C. Sadjadpour has conducted interviews with Iranians from all walks of life, and frequently appears on television, radio, and in print. He has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and has received numerous academic awards, including a Fulbright scholarship. He participated in a 2009 debate on Iran by the Miller Center.

Michael Singh is senior fellow and managing director at The Washington Institute, and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council. During his tenure at the White House from 2005 to 2008, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and coordinating U.S. national security policy toward the region stretching from Morocco to Iran, with a particular emphasis on Iran’s nuclear and regional activities, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Syria, and security cooperation in the broader Middle East. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and at the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv. Mr. Singh served as a Middle East advisor to the Romney presidential campaign from 2011-2012, and cochaired Mr. Romney’s State Department transition team in 2012. He served as an adjunct fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Security at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and as an economics instructor at Harvard College. Mr. Singh serves on the advisory boards of United Against Nuclear Iran and the Harvard International Review, and is a former term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sep
18
12:00PM
David M. Kennedy

David M. Kennedy is Professor of History Emeritus at Stanford University, where he has taught for more than forty years. Graduating seniors have four times elected him Class Day speaker and he has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. His book Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 2000. He has been a visiting professor at Oxford University and the University of Florence, Italy, and has lectured on American history in more than a dozen countries. His most recent book is The Modern American Military (Oxford University Press, 2013). 

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Sep
16
11:00AM
Kevin M. Kruse

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Oct. 18, 2015 / Nationally, Oct. 21, 2015

Kevin M. Kruse studies the political, social, and urban-suburban history of 20th-century America, with particular interest in the making of modern conservatism. Focused on conflicts over race, rights, and religion, he also studies the postwar South and modern suburbia.  Professor Kruse is the author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (2005), as well as co-editor of three collections: The New Suburban History (2006), with Thomas Sugrue; Spaces of the Modern City (2008), with Gyan Prakash; and Fog of War: The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement (2012) with Stephen Tuck.  His newest work is One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America (2015), a study of the rise of American religious nationalism in the mid-twentieth century. His first book, White Flight, won prizes including the 2007 Francis B. Simkins Award from the Southern Historical Association (for the best first book in Southern history, 2005-2006) and the 2007 Best Book Award in Urban Politics from the American Political Science Association.  In addition, Professor Kruse has been honored as one of America's top young "Innovators in the Arts and Sciences" by the Smithsonian Magazine, selected as  one of the top young historians in the country by the History News Network, and named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians.

Sep
14
4:00PM

American Forum - A Conversation with Bernie Sanders

Senator Bernie Sanders

September 14, 2015, 4:00PM

Senator Bernie Sanders

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, January 10, 2015 / Nationally, January 13, 2015

Bernie Sanders has served as U.S. senator from Vermont since 2008. Born in 1941, Sanders started his career as the mayor of Burlington, VT. He served four terms as the leader of Vermont's biggest city from 1981 to 1989. Sanders then moved on to the national political arena by winning a seat in the House of Representatives. In 2007, Sanders won election to the U.S. Senate and was reelected in 2012. He announced plans to run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2015.

All candidates currently running for president in either party have been invited to appear on American Forum. Senator Sanders is the first to accept our invitation. Encourage your favorite candidate to join us!

Sep
9
11:00AM
Ari Berman

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia,  Oct. 4, 2015/ Nationally,  Oct. 7, 2015

Countless books have been written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) in 1965 and the turbulent forces it unleashed. Give Us the Ballot tells this story for the first time. In this groundbreaking narrative history, Ari Berman charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit voting rights, from 1965 to the present day. The act enfranchised millions of Americans and is widely regarded as the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement. And yet, fifty years later, we are still fighting heated battles over race, representation, and political power, with lawmakers devising new strategies to keep minorities out of the voting booth and with the Supreme Court declaring a key part of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and an Investigative Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute. He has written extensively about American politics, civil rights and the intersection of money and politics. His stories have also appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian, and he is a frequent political commentator on MSNBC, C-Span and NPR.   Photo Credit: Ports Bishop

Sep
3
5:00PM

Greece and the Eurozone: Crisis Averted or Crash Test Dummies?

William Antholis, Yiorgos Allayannis, David Leblang

September 3, 2015, 5:00PM

William AntholisYiorgos AllayannisDavid Leblang

Seven years after Lehman Brothers, and six years after the ripple effects crossed the Atlantic and hit European shores, Greece and the Eurozone appear to have weathered yet another crisis. Greece’s Radical Left “SYRIZA” government took power in January, promising a new approach to Greece's near-depression that would emphasize debt relief and growth. Yet eight months later — after a near default and exit from the Eurozone — Greece seems to have returned to EU-designed austerity measures in exchange for nearly $90 billion of additional emergency loans. Rather than having averted a crisis, however, many observers believe that the latest bailout will only return Greece and Europe to economic hardship. In the first Great Issues event of the 2015-16 academic year, three University of Virginia experts will discuss the background to the crisis, its implications, and the future prospects for both Greece and the European Union.

This event is open to the public. No RSVP is required.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Sep
2
11:00AM
Brian Balogh

Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Sept. 27, 2015 / Nationally, Sept. 30, 2015

Brian Balogh serves as Compton Professor and chair of the National Fellowship Program at the Miller Center, and as professor of history at the University of Virginia. The author of A Government Out of Sight: The Mystery of National Authority in Nineteenth-Century America, Balogh cohosts the public radio show Backstory with the American History Guys. His new book, The Associational State: American Governance in the Twentieth Century, provides a fresh perspective on the role that the private sector, trade associations, and professional organizations have played in implementing public policies from the late-19th through 21st centuries. Balogh examines key historical periods through the lens of political development, paying particular attention to the ways government, social movements, and intermediary institutions have organized support and resources to achieve public ends. The Associational State contends that a wide gap exists between the ideological rhetoric that both parties deploy today and their far less ideologically driven behavior over the past century and a half, and offers one solution to the partisan gridlock that currently grips the nation.

Aug
28
12:00PM
Wendy Sherman

This program will not be web streamed. 

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Sept. 13, 2015 / Nationally, Sept. 16, 2015

Wendy Sherman, former undersecretary for political affairs and lead U.S. negotiator with Iran as the Obama administration has pursued a nuclear agreement. A former social worker, she also served as the director for EMILY's List, a political fundraising group aimed at getting pro-choice Democratic women elected. She first served in the State Department under the Clinton administration. She was appointed to her current position in 2011 by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Aug
26
11:00AM
Ryan Lizza

Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Sept. 20, 2015 / Nationally, Sept. 23, 2015

Ryan Lizza is the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker and an on-air contributor for CNN. Before joining The New Yorker in 2007, he served as political correspondent for The New Republic, correspondent for GQ, and contributing editor for New York. Lizza has also written for the New York TimesWashington Monthly, and The Atlantic. Since 1998, he has covered most of the country’s major political stories, including the last four presidential campaigns, and has written many political profiles for The New Yorker. His awards include the 2012 National Press Club’s Hood Award for Diplomatic Correspondence and the White House Correspondents’ Association’s Aldo Beckman Memorial Award. 

May
18
11:00AM
Orlando Patterson

Part of a new American Forum special series, What Now? Dialogues on Race in America

Television Broadcast: June 7, 2015

National Book Award winner ORLANDO PATTERSON, one of the nation’s leading sociologists, takes on a long-running debate over the causes of economic distress for inner-city America. Is it centuries of racism and discrimination against African Americans? Is it a failure of government policy since the Civil Rights movement? Or as New York magazine recently asked: does the real problem lie in “what black communities are doing to themselves”?  In his new book, The Cultural Matrix: Understanding Black Youth, Patterson seeks to unravel a uniquely American paradox: the socioeconomic crisis, segregation, and social isolation of disadvantaged black youth, on one hand, and their extraordinary integration and prominence in popular culture on the other. Patterson is the John Cowles Professor of Sociology at Harvard University and the author of Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study and The Ordeal of Integration: Progress and Resentment in America’s “Racial” Crisis. He has served as a special advisor for social policy and development to Prime Minister Michael Manley of Jamaica and is a founding member of Cultural Survival, one of the leading advocacy groups for the rights of indigenous peoples. His columns have appeared in Time, Newsweek, The New Republic, and the Washington Post. He is the recipient of many awards, including the National Book Award for Non-Fiction, the Ralph Bunche Award for the best book on pluralism, and the Order of Distinction by the Government of Jamaica.  Photo Credit: Stu Rosner

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

May
11
11:00AM

American Forum - Neither Left nor Right:  A Different Approach on Race

Fredrick C. Harris, Robert C. Lieberman

May 11, 2015, 11:00AM

Fredrick C. HarrisRobert C. Lieberman

Part of a new American Forum special series in Spring 2015

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America

Television Broadcast: May 31, 2014

FREDRICK C. HARRIS and ROBERT C. LIEBERMAN are the co-authors of Beyond Discrimination: Racial Discrimination in a Post-Racist Era. Harris is professor of political science and directs the Center on African-American Politics and Society at Columbia University. His research interests include American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. Harris’s books include Something Within: Religion in African-American Political Activism and The Price of the Ticket: Barack Obama and the Rise and Fall of Black Politics. His essays have appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the London Review of Books. As provost of Johns Hopkins University, Lieberman is responsible for promoting and coordinating the university’s teaching and research mission. He previously served as interim dean of Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and as professor of political science and public affairs. Lieberman is a well-known scholar on issues of race and politics in America, social welfare policy, and the welfare state. His books include Shifting the Color Line: Race and the American Welfare State and Shaping Race Policy: The United States in Comparative Perspective.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

May
8
12:15PM

Fellow: R. Joseph Parrott, History, University of Texas-Austin
Mentor: Robert McMahon, Ralph D. Mershon Distinguished Professor of History, Ohio State University

Fellow: Simon Stevens, History, Columbia University
Mentor: Saul Dubow, Professor of History, Queen Mary University

Moderator: Professor John Edwin Mason, Associate Professor of History, University of Virginia

May
8
9:15AM

Will Hitchcock Professor of History and Director of Academic Programs and Research at the Miller Center, University of Virginia

Reviewer: Kathryn Cramer Brownell, Assistant Professor of History, Purdue University

Reviewer: Kenneth Osgood, Professor of History, Director of the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs, Colorado School of Mines.

Reviewer: Mel Leffler, Edward Stettinius Professor of History, University of Virginia

Moderator: Sidney Milkis, White Burkett Professor of Politics and Miller Center Faculty Associate, University of Virginia

May
7
2:30PM

Fellow: Evan McCormick, History, University of Virginia
Mentor: Gilbert Joseph, Professor of History, Yale University

Fellow: Adam Goodman, History, University of Pennsylvania
Mentor: Geraldo Cadava, Assistant Professor of History, Northwestern University

Moderator: Cristina Lopez-Gottardi Chao, Research Director for Public and Policy Programs, Miller Center

May
7
12:00PM

Fellow: Judge Glock, History, Rutgers University
Mentor: Eric Rauchway, Professor of History, University of California-Davis

Fellow: David Reinecke, Sociology, Princeton University (Reinecke is the Ambrose Monnell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy)
Mentor: Richard John, Professor of History and Communications, Columbia University

Moderator: Guian McKee, Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of Virginia; Presidential Recordings Program, Miller Center

May
7
9:15AM

Fellow: Betsy Beasley, American Studies, Yale University
Mentor: Robert Vitalis, Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Fellow: Emily Pears, Politics, University of Virginia
Mentor: Emily Zackin, Assistant Professor of Political Science, The Johns Hopkins University

Moderator: Sarah Milov, Assistant Professor of History, University of Virginia

May
7
9:15AM

2015 Spring Fellows Conference

May 7, 2015 - May 8, 2015

Every year, the Miller Center Fellowship Program supports the completion of promising dissertations that employ history to shed light on American politics and public policy, foreign relations and the impact of global affairs on the United States, media and politics, and the role of the presidency in shaping American political development. 

Fellows are required to participate in the annual spring conference where they present their research and findings to scholars from the Miller Center and the University of Virginia.  During the conference each fellow’s dissertation is critiqued by his or her dream mentor and Miller Center and University of Virginia scholars. 

Click to download the full agenda (PDF). 

May
6
11:00AM
Peter Bergen

Part of a new American Forum special series in Spring 2015

The Aftermath of the Endless War

Television Broadcast: May 24, 2015

PETER BERGEN is a journalist, documentary producer, and the author of four books about al-Qaeda, three of which were New York Times best sellers. Bergen is the co-editor of Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, and Policy, a series of essays by legal scholars, journalists, government officials, military analysts, social scientists, and foreign policy experts. The book addresses drones' impact on the ground, how their use adheres to and challenges the laws of war, their relationship to complex policy challenges, and the ways they help us understand the future of war. Bergen serves as the director of the national security program at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C., and as CNN's national security analyst.

This event is part of…

Aftermath of the Endless War: This series of American Forum episodes examined the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and features conversations with several military, political, and diplomatic experts.

Page 3 of 108 pages  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›

View the full event archive >>