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Jan
13
11:00AM

American Forum - The International Migrant Crisis and How the World Can Respond

Kathleen Newland, David Leblang

January 13, 2016, 11:00AM

Kathleen NewlandDavid Leblang

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, January 31, 2016/Nationally, February 3 , 2016

Kathleen Newland is a Senior Fellow and Co-Founder of the Migration Policy Institute where she focuses on the relationship between migration and development, the governance of international migration, and refugee protection. Prior to this appointment, Newland worked for the Carnegie Endowment for international Peace, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, World Bank, and the office of the Secretary-General of the United Nations.

David Leblang, a political economis,  is a Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia and J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance at the Miller Center. Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense. He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and is currently working on two projects – the first focuses on how sending countries "harness" the human and material resources of their diasporas while the second is a study of the politics and policies that constrain the mobility of labor across states and nations.

Dec
16
11:00AM
Charles Murray

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia-January 17, 2016/Nationally-January 20, 2016

In Charles Murray’s newest book, By the People, the sometimes controversial author gives a spirited rebuke to government overreach, and proposes a campaign of non-violent civil disobedience in which citizens would simply refuse to follow many federal and state regulations. He argues that Americans are wrongfully and routinely obstructed by government as they run businesses, practice a vocation, raise families, or follow their religious beliefs.  Murray is the W. H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He came to national attention in 1984 with Losing Ground, and in 1994, with The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life, written with Richard Herrnstein.

Dec
10
11:00AM

American Forum - The Dysfunction of American Justice

Brandon L. Garrett

December 10, 2015, 11:00AM

Brandon L. Garrett

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia-January 24, 2016/Nationally-January 27, 2016

Brandon Garrett, is the Roy L. and Rosamond Woodruff Morgan Professor of Law at the University of Virginia where he teaches criminal procedure, wrongful convictions, habeas corpus, corporate crime, civil rights, and constitutional law. Garrett is also the author of Too Big to Jail (2014) and Convicting the innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong (2011). Together they explore the many ways our justice system is broken and what we can do to fix it.  Photo Credit: Ian Bradshaw

Dec
2
3:30PM
Thomas Blanton

This event is open to the public, no RSVP is required.

Thomas S. Blanton is director of the National Security Archive at The George Washington University in Washington D.C., where he oversees the archive’s more than 32,000 Freedom of Information Act requests. He is the author of White House E-Mail: The Top Secret Computer Messages the Reagan-Bush White House Tried to Destroy. He co-authored The Chronology on the Iran-contra affair, and served as a contributing author to three editions of the ACLU’s authoritative guide, Litigation Under the Federal Open Government Laws, and to the Brookings Institution study, Atomic Audit: The Costs and Consequences of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Since 1940

 

This event will be live tweeted. Please follow Niki Hemmer @pastpunditry and @POTUStudies for a live tweetchat.

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Dec
2
11:00AM
Marc Solomon

PBS World Channel Broadcast:  Virginia-January 3, 2016/Nationally-January 6, 2016

In Winning Marriage, Marc Solomon, a veteran leader in the movement for marriage equality and national campaign director for Freedom to Marry, gives the reader a seat at the strategy-setting and decision-making table in the campaign that led to the historic Supreme Court Ruling. He reveals the inner workings of the advocacy movement that has won legislative, court, and electoral battles over the 12 years since the landmark Massachusetts ruling guaranteeing marriage for same-sex couples for the first time. He is a graduate of Yale and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.  Photo credit: Zachary Tyler Newton.

Nov
10
11:00AM

American Forum - Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice

Adam Benforado

November 10, 2015, 11:00AM

Adam Benforado

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 13, 2015/Nationally-December 16, 2015

Weaving together historical examples, scientific studies, and compelling court cases—from the border collie put on trial in Kentucky to the five teenagers who falsely confessed in the Central Park Jogger case, Adam Benforado, an associate professor of law at Drexel University, argues that our judicial processes fail to uphold our values and protect society’s weakest members. He  lays out the scope of the legal system’s dysfunction and proposes a wealth of practical reforms that could prevent injustice and help us achieve true fairness and equality before the law.  Photo credit: Joe Craig.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Nov
7
7:00PM
Oliver Stone

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 6, 2015/Nationally-December 9, 2015

A conversation with Academy Award-winning director, producer, and writer Oliver Stone.

Nov
2
10:45AM

Panel 2:  McCurdy Fellow Panel

 

  • Sarah Seo, Princeton University Department of History, “The Automobile and the Cold War Fourth Amendment”
  • Nora Krinitsky, University of Michigan Department of History, “Beer Wars and Black Votes: Policing the Color Line in Interwar Chicago”
  • Risa Goluboff, University of Virginia School of Law, Comment
  • David Sklansky, Stanford Law School, Comment
  • Moderator: Sarah Barringer Gordon, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Nov
1
9:00AM

Panel 1: Federalism and Ideas of Sovereignty

 

  • Kate Brown, Huntington University Department of History and Political Science, “Founding Federalism:  Alexander Hamilton’s Concurrent Constitutionalism”
  • Lindsay Robertson, University of Oklahoma College of Law, “Restoring Relations with Five Nations after the Civil War: The Fort Smith Conference and the Legal Complexities of Post-Civil War Indian Treaty Rights” 
  • Cynthia L. Nicoletti, University of Virginia School of Law, "Reimagining the Union: The Contours of Federalism after the Civil War”
  • J. Gordon Hylton, University of Virginia School of Law, “The Fuller Court and the State Police Power: A Quantitation Study in the History of Federalism”
  • Bernie D. Jones, Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, “The ‘New Federalism’ and Current Challenges to Legal Historiography” 
  • Moderator: Hendrik Hartog, Princeton University History Department
Nov
1
9:00AM

The Legacy of Charles W. McCurdy

November 1, 2015 - November 2, 2015

This conference celebrates and explores the legacy of Charles W. McCurdy on a scholarly and personal level. It also serves to inaugurate the Charles W. McCurdy Fellowship in Legal History at the Miller Center and School of Law. During a 40-year career in the Corcoran Department of History and the School of Law, McCurdy has been the intellectual and pedagogical heart of legal history at the University of Virginia. His scholarship earned him the 2003 Order of the Coif Triennial Book Award for “The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865.” His teaching has earned him not only official recognition but, more importantly, claim to having directed or advised more than 200 doctoral dissertations, master’s theses, and undergraduate theses.

Click here for a full schedule of events.

Oct
28
8:00AM

American Forum - Will Syria Be Barack Obama’s Vietnam?

Frederik Logevall

October 28, 2015, 8:00AM

Frederik Logevall

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia-November 29, 2015/Nationally-December 2, 2015

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History at Harvard University. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won four prizes, including the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

Oct
27
3:30PM
Fredrik Logevall

This event is open to the public. 

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History at Harvard University. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won four prizes, including the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

This event will be live tweeted. You can join the conversation by following @POTUStudies and Ken Hughes @FatalPolitics with #AgonyofVietnam.  

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Oct
26
11:00AM

American Forum - The View from the White House

Peter Baker

October 26, 2015, 11:00AM

Peter Baker

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Nov. 22, 2015/Nationally, Nov. 25, 2015

Peter Baker is the chief White House correspondent for the New York Times. He has covered three presidents for the Times and the Washington Post, winning the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency and the Aldo Beckman Memorial Award for White House coverage. Baker has covered some of the most dramatic political issues and scandals in American history, including the Clinton administration’s Monica Lewinsky scandal, as well as the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, Supreme Court nominations, and the American economy. He has also covered decades of major international stories, including the rise of Vladimir Putin and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. A best-selling author, Baker’s books include Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House, The Breach: Inside the Impeachment and Trial of William Jefferson Clinton, and Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the End of Revolution.

Oct
21
11:00AM
Cokie Roberts

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia,  November 8, 2015/ Nationally,  Nov. 11, 2015

Cokie Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News and NPR. She has won countless awards and in 2008 was named a “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress. She is the author of the New York Times bestsellers We are Our Mothers’ Daughters; Founding Mothers: Ladies of Liberty; and, with her husband, the journalist Steven V. Roberts, From This Day Forward and Our Haggadah. Photo Credit: Randy Sager, American Broadcasting Companies, Inc.

Oct
19
12:30PM

The Moynihan Report after Fifty Years: the Controversy and its Legacy

Daniel Geary, Daryl Scott

October 19, 2015, 12:30PM

Daniel GearyDaryl Scott

On the 50th anniversary of Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s controversial study, The Negro Family: A Case for National Action, the Miller Center’s Great Issues program will explore the report and its ongoing legacy for debates about race and economic inequality in the United States. Although conceived by Moynihan as an attempt to probe connections between racial inequality, economic injustice, and family structure, the report touched off a heated debate over its contention that households headed by single mothers constrained African American social and economic progress. The debate over the Moynihan report remains relevant today, as political leaders ranging from Paul Ryan to Barack Obama have recently referred to the report and its conclusions. On October 19, Daniel Geary and Daryl Scott, two leading scholars, will examine this debate, its history, and its implications for discussions of race today.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Oct
14
11:00AM

American Forum - SPECTACLE: The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga

Pamela Newkirk

October 14, 2015, 11:00AM

Pamela Newkirk

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Nov. 15, 2015/National, Nov. 18, 2015

Award-winning scholar and journalist Pamela Newkirk reveals a little-known and shameful episode in American history, when an African man was displayed as an exhibit in the Museum of Natural History and the Bronx Zoo. SPECTACLE is a shocking story of racial prejudice, science, and tragedy in the early years of the Twentieth century—and also a critical episode for understanding why even in 2015 many Americans still see issues of race in profoundly different ways. Ms. Newkirk is a journalist and a professor of journalism, and a director of undergraduate studies at New York University. She is the author of Within the Veil: Black Journalists, White Media, which won the National Press Club Award for Media Criticism, and the editor of Letters from Black AmericaPhoto credit: Joe Henson

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Oct
7
11:00AM
Joy-Ann Reid

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, Nov. 1, 2015/ Nationally, Nov. 4, 2015

Joy-Ann Reid is a national correspondent for MSNBC and previous host of MSNBC's The Reid Report - a daily program that offered distinctive analysis and insight on the day’s news. In her new book, Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide,  Ms. Reid traces the Democratic Party back to the early 1960s in order to demonstrate the role of race in major party decisions and to explain why the issue is so important to understanding American politics today.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Oct
2
1:00PM

Media, Technology, and Partisanship

Doug Blackmon, Jamelle Bouie, Nicole Hemmer, Brian Balogh

October 2, 2015, 1:00PM

Doug BlackmonJamelle BouieNicole HemmerBrian Balogh

“Seeing Beyond the Partisan Divide” is a two day symposium and workshop gathering scholars and graduate students from different disciplines and institutions to push scholarly inquiry – and ultimately engaged citizens and media through a published volume – to explore political history and political institutions from angles that challenge or transcend our hyper-polarized understandings of American politics and democracy. This conference is generously supported by the Miller Center, the Page-Barbour Interdisciplinary Initiatives Committee, the University of Virginia, and the American Political History Institute at Boston University.

This conversation is the public session of "Seeing Beyond the Partisan Divide" and will explore the media's role in shaping and, ultimately, perhaps, transcending our polarized political, social, and democratic landscape. Doug Blackmon is a Pulitzer-Prize winning author, journalist, and executive producer and host of the Miller Center's American Forum program. Previously, he worked at both The Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at Slate.com whose writing has appeared either online or in print at The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, BookForum, TheWashington Post, Democracy Journal, and TIME. The Miller Center's Nicole Hemmer is a historian who writes a weekly column about politics and history for U.S. News & World Report. Her book Messengers of the Right, a history of conservative media in the United States, will be published in Penn Press’s series, Politics and Culture in Modern America, in Spring 2016. The conversation will be moderated by Brian Balogh, Compton Professor at the Miller Center and professor of history in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia.

Oct
2
10:00AM
Jamelle Bouie

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 20, 2015/Nationally December 23, 2015

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at Slate.com whose writing has appeared either online or in print at The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, BookForum, The Washington Post, Democracy Journal, and TIME.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Sep
30
11:00AM

American Forum - Where Does the U.S.-Iran Nuclear Deal Go Now?

Karim Sadjadpour, Michael Singh

September 30, 2015, 11:00AM

Karim SadjadpourMichael Singh

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, Oct. 25, 2015/Nationally, Oct. 28, 2015

Karim Sadjadpour, an associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, has served as the chief Iran analyst at the International Crisis Group based in Tehran and Washington, D.C. Sadjadpour has conducted interviews with Iranians from all walks of life, and frequently appears on television, radio, and in print. He has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and has received numerous academic awards, including a Fulbright scholarship. He participated in a 2009 debate on Iran by the Miller Center.

Michael Singh is senior fellow and managing director at The Washington Institute, and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council. During his tenure at the White House from 2005 to 2008, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and coordinating U.S. national security policy toward the region stretching from Morocco to Iran, with a particular emphasis on Iran’s nuclear and regional activities, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Syria, and security cooperation in the broader Middle East. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and at the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv. Mr. Singh served as a Middle East advisor to the Romney presidential campaign from 2011-2012, and cochaired Mr. Romney’s State Department transition team in 2012. He served as an adjunct fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Security at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and as an economics instructor at Harvard College. Mr. Singh serves on the advisory boards of United Against Nuclear Iran and the Harvard International Review, and is a former term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sep
18
12:00PM
David M. Kennedy

David M. Kennedy is Professor of History Emeritus at Stanford University, where he has taught for more than forty years. Graduating seniors have four times elected him Class Day speaker and he has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. His book Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 2000. He has been a visiting professor at Oxford University and the University of Florence, Italy, and has lectured on American history in more than a dozen countries. His most recent book is The Modern American Military (Oxford University Press, 2013). 

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Sep
16
11:00AM
Kevin M. Kruse

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Oct. 18, 2015 / Nationally, Oct. 21, 2015

Kevin M. Kruse studies the political, social, and urban-suburban history of 20th-century America, with particular interest in the making of modern conservatism. Focused on conflicts over race, rights, and religion, he also studies the postwar South and modern suburbia.  Professor Kruse is the author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (2005), as well as co-editor of three collections: The New Suburban History (2006), with Thomas Sugrue; Spaces of the Modern City (2008), with Gyan Prakash; and Fog of War: The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement (2012) with Stephen Tuck.  His newest work is One Nation Under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America (2015), a study of the rise of American religious nationalism in the mid-twentieth century. His first book, White Flight, won prizes including the 2007 Francis B. Simkins Award from the Southern Historical Association (for the best first book in Southern history, 2005-2006) and the 2007 Best Book Award in Urban Politics from the American Political Science Association.  In addition, Professor Kruse has been honored as one of America's top young "Innovators in the Arts and Sciences" by the Smithsonian Magazine, selected as  one of the top young historians in the country by the History News Network, and named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians.

Sep
14
4:00PM

American Forum - A Conversation with Bernie Sanders

Senator Bernie Sanders

September 14, 2015, 4:00PM

Senator Bernie Sanders

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia, January 10, 2015 / Nationally, January 13, 2015

Bernie Sanders has served as U.S. senator from Vermont since 2008. Born in 1941, Sanders started his career as the mayor of Burlington, VT. He served four terms as the leader of Vermont's biggest city from 1981 to 1989. Sanders then moved on to the national political arena by winning a seat in the House of Representatives. In 2007, Sanders won election to the U.S. Senate and was reelected in 2012. He announced plans to run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2015.

All candidates currently running for president in either party have been invited to appear on American Forum. Senator Sanders is the first to accept our invitation. Encourage your favorite candidate to join us!

Sep
9
11:00AM
Ari Berman

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia,  Oct. 4, 2015/ Nationally,  Oct. 7, 2015

Countless books have been written about the civil rights movement, but far less attention has been paid to what happened after the dramatic passage of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) in 1965 and the turbulent forces it unleashed. Give Us the Ballot tells this story for the first time. In this groundbreaking narrative history, Ari Berman charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit voting rights, from 1965 to the present day. The act enfranchised millions of Americans and is widely regarded as the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement. And yet, fifty years later, we are still fighting heated battles over race, representation, and political power, with lawmakers devising new strategies to keep minorities out of the voting booth and with the Supreme Court declaring a key part of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and an Investigative Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute. He has written extensively about American politics, civil rights and the intersection of money and politics. His stories have also appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian, and he is a frequent political commentator on MSNBC, C-Span and NPR.   Photo Credit: Ports Bishop

Sep
3
5:00PM

Greece and the Eurozone: Crisis Averted or Crash Test Dummies?

William Antholis, Yiorgos Allayannis, David Leblang

September 3, 2015, 5:00PM

William AntholisYiorgos AllayannisDavid Leblang

Seven years after Lehman Brothers, and six years after the ripple effects crossed the Atlantic and hit European shores, Greece and the Eurozone appear to have weathered yet another crisis. Greece’s Radical Left “SYRIZA” government took power in January, promising a new approach to Greece's near-depression that would emphasize debt relief and growth. Yet eight months later — after a near default and exit from the Eurozone — Greece seems to have returned to EU-designed austerity measures in exchange for nearly $90 billion of additional emergency loans. Rather than having averted a crisis, however, many observers believe that the latest bailout will only return Greece and Europe to economic hardship. In the first Great Issues event of the 2015-16 academic year, three University of Virginia experts will discuss the background to the crisis, its implications, and the future prospects for both Greece and the European Union.

This event is open to the public. No RSVP is required.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

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