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Nov
15
10:15AM

Panel One: Taiwan, China, and Asia: Inclusive Identities?

Fred Damon, John Fuh-Sheng Hsieh, John Shepherd

November 15, 2013, 10:15AM

Fred Damon John Fuh-Sheng Hsieh John Shepherd

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
15
9:00AM

Dynamics of Inclusiveness

Gerald L Baliles, Brantly Womack, Dr Harry Harding

November 15, 2013, 9:00AM

Gerald L Baliles Brantly Womack Dr Harry Harding

Since the beginning of the Cold War, Taiwan has been considered a flashpoint of American security concerns in the Asia-Pacific.  This posture was re-confirmed in the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, and it remains a premise of any overview of U.S. commitments and risks in the region.  At the same time, Taiwan sees the leverage of American security support as vital balance against China, and China’s complaints about continued arms sales to Taiwan are a major irritant in U.S.-China relations.  Over sixty years of history, habit, and inertia have given rise to the idea of the relationship as an exclusive security triangle, in which improvement in relations between any two are a concern to the third.

However, Taiwan’s reality is much more complex than simply posing a security problem for China and the U.S. From earliest times Taiwan has been a locus of interaction among cultures, and globalization enhances the opportunities for Taiwan’s inclusiveness.  The theme of this international conference, organized by the Miller Center's C.K. Yen Chair BRANTLY WOMACK, is Taiwan’s inclusive identity in Asia and the world.  

Featuring scholars of international relations from across the U.S. and Asia, this conference is the first in a series of four international conferences to explore the replacement of the Cold War paradigm of the Washington-Beijing-Taipei triangle by one based on inclusive, opportunity-driven relationships.  Follow-up conferences will be held in Taiwan (2014), Shanghai (2015) and Macau (2016).

If you'd like to attend lunch on either day of the conference, an RSVP is required by November 13 to gage@virginia.edu.

Nov
13
11:00AM

American Forum - Surrender at Appomattox: What did it really mean?

Elizabeth R. Varon

November 13, 2013, 11:00AM

Elizabeth R. Varon

Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House evokes a highly gratifying image in the popular mind: it was, many believe, a moment that transcended politics, a moment of healing, a moment of patriotism untainted by ideology. But as Elizabeth R. Varon reveals in this vividly narrated history, this rosy image conceals a seething debate over precisely what the surrender meant and what kind of nation would emerge from war. The combatants in that debate included the iconic Lee and Grant, but they also included a cast of characters previously overlooked, who brought their own understanding of the war's causes, consequences, and meaning. Varon is Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History at the University of Virginia. A noted Civil War historian, she is the author of Disunion!: The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789–1859; We Mean to be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia; and Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, A Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy, which was named one of the "Five Best" books on the "Civil War away from the battlefield" by the Wall Street Journal. A book signing will follow her Forum.

Nov
11
3:15PM

Lessons Learned: State-Building in Afghanistan

Hilda Arellano, Ryan Crocker, Elizabeth Field, Robin Lynn Raphel

November 11, 2013, 3:15PM

Hilda Arellano Ryan Crocker Elizabeth Field Robin Lynn Raphel

The 2013 Ambassador William C. Battle Symposium on American Diplomacy

A roundtable of eminent scholars and distinguished public officials will explore the lessons American policy-makers, national security officials, diplomats and public opinion leaders have drawn -- and should draw -- from the United States’ decade-long experience of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. What can we learn from the American effort at state-building? Where did we succeed? Where did we fail? And what do we now know about the strengths and the limitations of our state-building capabilities? 

 

 

Nov
11
1:30PM

Lessons Learned: State-Building in Iraq

Stuart W. Bowen, Seth Center, Ryan Crocker, James Savage

November 11, 2013, 1:30PM

Stuart W. Bowen Seth Center Ryan Crocker James Savage

The 2013 Ambassador William C. Battle Symposium on American Diplomacy

A roundtable of eminent scholars and distinguished public officials will explore the lessons American policy-makers, national security officials, diplomats and public opinion leaders have drawn -- and should draw -- from the United States’ decade-long experience of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. What can we learn from the American effort at state-building? Where did we succeed? Where did we fail? And what do we now know about the strengths and the limitations of our state-building capabilities? 

 

 

Nov
8
3:30PM

Andrew Jackson and the Troubled Birth of Democracy

Henry William Brands

November 8, 2013, 3:30PM

Henry William Brands

HENRY WILLIAM (H.W.) BRANDS sold cutlery across the American West before earning graduate degrees in mathematics and history in Oregon and Texas. He taught at Vanderbilt University and Texas A&M University before joining the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is the Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History. His books on American history and politics include The Man Who Saved the Union, Traitor to His Class, Andrew Jackson, The Age of Gold, The First American, and TR. Traitor to His Class and The First American were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. 

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Oct
25
12:30PM

Colloquium - There’s No Place Like Home

Jennifer Klein

October 25, 2013, 12:30PM

Jennifer Klein

Long-Term Care and the Growth of Low-Wage Labor in the U.S. Welfare State

Yale History Professor JENNIFER KLEIN will discuss the emergence of home-care work as a critical part of the U.S. health-care system and welfare state. Klein will explain how the public and private sectors interacted to turn home care into a low-wage job at the lowest rungs of the American medical system – a job that was often stigmatized through both its long association with the labor of poor women of color and its more recent links to welfare-to-work programs. Yet Klein will also show how home care has emerged as a dynamic part of the American labor movement in recent decades. 

  • Introduction from Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (Oxford University Press, 2012)
  • Chapter 6: The Union is Us from Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (Oxford University Press, 2012)

JENNIFER KLEIN is professor of history at Yale University. She earned her Ph.D. at U.Va. and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation fellow in Health Policy.  Klein’s publications include Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State, co-authored with Eileen Boris, which was awarded the Sara A. Whaley Book Prize from the National Women’s Studies Association; and For All These Rights: Business, Labor, and the Shaping of America’s Public-Private Welfare State, which was awarded the Ellis W. Hawley Prize in Political History/Political Economy from the Organization of American Historians and the Hagley Prize in Business History from the Business History Conference.

This colloquium is part of the Fall 2013 Miller Center Colloquium Series, Historical Perspectives on the Health Care Crisis, organized by GUIAN MCKEE, associate professor of public policy at the Miller Center.  Support for the series comes from the Claude Moore Foundation.

This event will be live-streamed and archived, and lunch will be served.  Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, October 23.

Oct
21
4:00PM

Moderated by Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, CNBC

Minister Anabel González—Minister of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica

Mr. Juan Carlos Paiz—Guatemala’s Presidential Commissioner for Competitiveness, Investment and Millennium Challenge Corporation

Secretary Hugo Martinez—Secretary General of SICA (Sistema de Integracion Centroamericana) 

Oct
21
2:30PM

Moderated by Evan Perez, CNN

Ambassador Muni Figueres— Costa Rican Ambassador to the United States

Ambassador Mario Jaramillo—Panamanian Ambassador to the United States

Ambassador Ruben Zamora—El Salvadorian Ambassador to the United States

Oct
21
1:00PM

In another installment of the Forum's look back at the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy presidency, we bring together JFK scholars, experts in Latin America, and several current ambassadors and high level ministers from Central America, for three panel discussions looking at President Kennedy’s complicated legacy in those countries and the state of the region today. Also featuring CNBC Chief International Correspondent Michelle Caruso-Cabrera and CNN Justice Department Correspondent Evan Perez.

Oct
16
3:30PM

James Knox Polk and the War with Mexico

Daniel Walker Howe

October 16, 2013, 3:30PM

Daniel Walker Howe

DANIEL WALKER HOWE is Rhodes Professor of American History Emeritus at Oxford University and Professor of History Emeritus at UCLA.  He won the Pulitzer Prize for his book What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848.  Besides many other books and scholarly articles, he has published in The New York Review of Books, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Playboy, and Smithsonian Magazine, and was historical advisor to the TV series America: The Story of Us, which ran on the History Channel.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Oct
16
11:00AM

American Forum - JFK and the Vietnam Escalation

Marc Selverstone

October 16, 2013, 11:00AM

Marc Selverstone

Marc Selverstone is Chair of the Presidential Recordings Program at the Miller Center. He joined the Miller Center in November 2000 after receiving his Ph.D. in U.S. Foreign Relations from Ohio University. His interests include U.S. foreign relations post-1945, the culture of the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. He is author of Constructing the Monolith: The United States, Great Britain, and International Communism, 1945–1950 (Harvard University Press, 2009), which won the Stuart L. Bernath Book Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations in 2010. He is presently at work on The Kennedy Withdrawal: Camelot and the American Commitment to Vietnam, which is under contract with Harvard University Press. This Forum is part of the Miller Center’s 50th Anniversary retrospective on the Kennedy Presidency.

Oct
11
1:45PM

Taeku Lee, University of California, Berkeley

Nicole Mellow, Williams College

Gabriel Sanchez, University of New Mexico

Moderator: Ryan Lizza, The New Yorker

Closing Comments: Governor Gerald L. Baliles, Director and CEO, Miller Center

Oct
11
10:45AM

Rey Koslowski, State University of New York at Albany

Muzaffar Chishti, Migration Policy Institute

Janic Fine, Rutgers University

Moderator: Julia Preston, The New York Times

Oct
11
9:00AM

Introduction: Governor Gerald L. Baliles, Director and CEO, Miller Center

Session 1
Nancy Foner, The City University of New York
Daniel Tichenor, University of Oregon
Karthick Ramakrishnan, University of California, Riverside
Moderator: Audrey Singer, Brookings Institution

Oct
10
5:00PM

On October 10, from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m., the conference, “Immigration Reform: Politics, Policy and Process,” will kick off with a reception and keynote roundtable, "How Have the Media Covered Immigration Reform?" Participants include TED HESSON, FusionRYAN LIZZA, The New Yorker; JULIA PRESTON, The New York Times; and BETH REINHARD, National Journal. The roundtable will be moderated by RAY SUAREZ of PBS NewsHour.

Oct
10
9:00AM

Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center

Washington, D.C.

Among the most contentious of today’s policymaking challenges is the issue of immigration. Comprehensive reform has languished for more than a decade, locked in political stalemate, despite near consensus that the nation’s immigration system is fundamentally broken. All the while, significant contributions to U.S. innovation and economic competitiveness have been stymied by existing immigration provisions. What does the historical and cultural context of immigration reform tell us about prospects for legislative action? What are the impediments facing implementing effective policy? What are the implications of reform along electoral and party lines?

This conference will look beyond the travails of a "broken" legislature slouching toward immigration reform. Featuring eminent scholars from political science, economics, and law along with practitioners and policymakers, the conference will focus on three topics: The Historical, Legislative and Cultural Context for Immigration Reform; Prospects and Promise for Workplace and Border Security; and the Implications of Reform for Electoral and Party Alignments.

Organized by conference directors DAVID LEBLANG (Miller Center), SID MILKIS (Miller Center), and DANIEL TICHENOR (University of Oregon), “Immigration Reform: Politics, Policy and Process” will take place at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., before an invited audience. It will be recorded for the Miller Center’s archives. If you are interested in attending, please contact Anne Carter Mulligan at acm8k@virginia.edu.

Oct
7
11:00AM

American Forum - Escape from the Quagmire? The Way Ahead in Syria, Egypt and the Middle East

Ryan Crocker, David Rohde, Shibley Telhami

October 7, 2013, 11:00AM

Ryan Crocker David Rohde Shibley Telhami

A CONVERSATION WITH AMBASSADOR RYAN CROCKER, DAVID ROHDE, and SHIBLEY TELHAMI 

Bringing together the foremost American diplomat to the Islamic world, a two-time Pulitzer Prize- winning journalist specializing in the Middle East, and one of the leading scholars of attitudes in the region, the Forum offers a frank discussion of whether the U.S. can re-establish firm footing after the cataclysmic events of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Arab Spring, the Egyptian coup(s), and the crisis in Syria. 

Featuring:

  • Ryan Crocker, the 2013 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center, holder of the U.S. Foreign Service’s highest rank, served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012, ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, and previously ambassador to Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait, and Lebanon;  
  • David Rohde, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, was kidnapped by the Taliban, now a reporter for ThomsonReuters, and the author of Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in a New Middle East
  • Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, College Park, non-resident senior fellow at the Saban Center at the Brookings Institution, and author most recently of The World Through Arab Eyes: Arab Public Opinion and the Reshaping of the Middle East.
Oct
4
1:00PM

Colloquium - Lead Wars, Panel 2: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children

James Childress, Merlin Chowkwanyun, Patricia King, Guian McKee, Jack Schwartz

October 4, 2013, 1:00PM

James Childress Merlin Chowkwanyun Patricia King Guian McKee Jack Schwartz

The afternoon session from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. will feature:

  • MERLIN CHOWKWANYUN, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar, University of Wisconsin, and former Miller Center National Fellow
  • JAMES CHILDRESS, University Professor & John Allen Hollingsworth Professor of Ethics, University of Virginia
  • PATRICIA KING, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics, and Public Policy, Georgetown Law Center
  • JACK SCHWARTZ, visiting professor of law and health care law and policy fellow, University of Maryland (former assistant attorney general, Maryland)
  • GUIAN MCKEE (moderator), associate professor of public policy at the Miller Center
Oct
4
10:00AM
Gerald Markowitz David Rosner

This special symposium on David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz’s Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America's Children will kick off the Fall 2013 Miller Center Colloquium Series on Historical Perspectives on the Health Care Crisis, organized by GUIAN MCKEE, associate professor of public policy at the Miller Center. 

This special symposium has been co-organized by McKee and former Miller Center Fellow MERLIN CHOWKWANYUN.

Please click on the colloquium title above to see a full list of participants and the timing of the panels.

This symposium is being co-sponsored by the U.Va. Institute for Practical Ethics and Public Life, the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities of the School of Medicine, the Claude Moore Foundation, and the Department of Public Health Sciences at the U.Va. School of Medicine.

Please RSVP to gage@virginia.edu by noon on Wednesday, October 2 if you’d like to attend the lunch that will occur between the two panels.

Oct
2
6:00PM

American Forum - A Town Hall Meeting on the Middle Class and State of the American Dream

Martin Baron, Jennifer Marsico, Thomas A. Hirschl

October 2, 2013, 6:00PM

Martin Baron Jennifer Marsico Thomas A. Hirschl

The University of Virginia’s Miller Center will hold a town hall in Charlottesville on Wednesday, October 2 that will examine the shrinking of the middle class and its impact on the state of the American Dream. This event will launch the Milstein Symposium, a new Miller Center initiative that will address challenges facing the middle class.

The town hall, which begins at 6 pm, will focus on a soon-to-be-released Washington Post/Miller Center poll that is asking respondents about their financial security and what the American Dream means to them.

Participants will include MARTIN BARON, executive editor of The Washington Post, THOMAS A. HIRSCHL, co-author of Chasing the American Dream: Understanding What Shape Our Fortunes, and JENNIFER MARISCO, a researcher at the American Enterprise Institute. It will be moderated by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Douglas Blackmon, host of the Miller Center’s American Forum.

The town hall will be live streamed at www.millercenter.org. It will later be broadcast on public television stations across the nation.

The size of the middle class has steadily decreased for the past four decades. In the early 2000s, middle-income households did not account for the largest percentage of U.S. aggregate household income for the first time. The town hall will explore critical questions regarding this trend and the future of the American Dream. What does the American Dream mean today?  What are the present challenges to achieving it?  How can we restore it?  What is the impact of emerging technologies?  Why is a robust and stable middle class vital to the nation’s future?

The Milstein Symposium will bring together policymakers, business leaders, scholars, and journalists to advance innovative and nonpartisan ideas to help rebuild the American Dream. The first year will focus on creating the jobs of the future, and three commissions will examine topics in manufacturing, entrepreneurship and self-employment, and infrastructure investment.

The Milstein Symposium is named for philanthropist, business and civic leader Howard P. Milstein. Milstein is chairman, president and chief executive officer of New York Private Bank and Trust and its operating bank, Emigrant Bank, the country's largest privately held bank.

The Miller Center has created a Facebook page where users can share what the American Dream means to them. The address is http://on.fb.me/1dvo3g2. Twitter users can also tweet their thoughts to @Miller_Center, using the hashtag #AmericanDream

Sep
27
11:15AM

Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic, and Evidence

Frank Harvey, Melvyn P. Leffler, John M. Owen, William B Quandt, Philip Zelikow

September 27, 2013, 11:15AM

Frank Harvey Melvyn P. Leffler John M. Owen William B Quandt Philip Zelikow

FRANK HARVEY, professor of international relations at Dalhousie University, WILLIAM QUANDT, professor emeritus of politics at U.Va., MEL LEFFLER, U.Va.'s Edward Stettinius Professor of History and Miller Center Faculty Associate, and PHILIP ZELIKOWWhite Burkett Miller Professor of History at U.Va., will discuss Harvey's new book, Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic, and Evidence.

A book signing will follow this event.

This public panel will conclude the academic conference, "History, Method, and the Future ofSecurity Studies" organized by JOHN OWEN, Taylor Professor of Politics at U.Va. and Editor-in-Chief of Security Studies.  Security Studies is a peer-reviewed academic journal housed at the Miller Center.

Sep
25
11:00AM

American Forum - JFK and the Anger of the 1960s

Steven L. Davis, Bill Minutaglio

September 25, 2013, 11:00AM

Steven L. Davis Bill Minutaglio

In their new book, Dallas 1963, BILL MINUTAGLIO and STEVEN L. DAVIS offer a fresh new understanding of the social and political climate in the U.S. in the weeks and months leading to John F. Kennedy's assassination. They explore the forces that led many people to warn President Kennedy to avoid Dallas on his fateful trip to Texas. Minutaglio and Davis lead us through intimate glimpses of the Kennedy family and the machinations of the Kennedy White House, to a group of political activists in Dallas who fanned flames of anger at JFK—and who some later blamed for the president's death. A professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Minutaglio has worked at the Dallas Morning News, Houston Chronicle, and San Antonio Express-News. He has written books about George W. Bush, Molly Ivins, Alberto Gonzales, and America's greatest industrial disaster. Davis is the author of two highly praised books on Texas and is a curator at Texas State University, which holds the literary papers of Cormac McCarthy and many other writers. Photo Credit: Dennis Darling

Sep
18
5:00PM

Colloquium - Lincoln and Davis: War Presidents

Gary W. Gallagher, James M. McPherson

September 18, 2013, 5:00PM

Gary W. Gallagher James M. McPherson

A Conversation with James McPherson and Gary Gallagher 

GARY W. GALLAGHER is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. He earned his graduate degrees from the University of Texas at Austin. He has published widely in the field of Civil War-era history, most recently Causes Won, Lost and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War, The Union War, and Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty. In 2010-2012, he held the Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professorship, the highest teaching award conveyed by the University.

JAMES M. MCPHERSON is the George Henry Davis '86 Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton University, where he taught for more than 40 years. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he held the presidency of the American Historical Association in 2003. His numerous books on the Civil War era include Battle Cry of Freedom, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, as well as For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War and Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief, both of which won the Lincoln Prize in 1998 and 2009, respectively.  His most recent book is War on the Waters: The Union and Confederate Navies, 1861-1865.

This special kickoff event for the Historical Presidency Series will take place on grounds at Nau Hall, Room 101.  Please click here for directions to Nau Hall.  There is a K2 parking lot located behind Nau, on Brandon Avenue, with first come, first served unrestricted parking beginning at 5pm.  Paid parking is available in the 11th street or central grounds parking garages.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

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