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Riding the Tiger > Category: Personal Life and Personality

Riding The Tiger

“I discovered that being a President is like riding a tiger. A man has to keep on riding or be swallowed.” Harry S. Truman

Friday Feature: Looking back through history

Ethyl Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy take a self-portrait

Earlier this year a special collection of Kennedy memorabilia—owned by David Powers, former special assistant to the President—was auctioned by John McInnis Auctioneers. The collection fetched almost $2 million. See more of the collection.

Pictured in this undated photo (left to right) are Ethyl Kennedy (sister-in-law to the President), Jacqueline Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy.

Interested in learning more about the Kennedy Family? Miller Center scholar Barbara A. Perry has written a compelling and intimate portrait of Rose Kennedy, mother to the President. The book becomes available in July. Learn more about Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch.

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Friday Feature: Under Pressure

President Johnson sits at a conference table with his head down.

President Johnson listened to a tape sent by a soldier in Vietnam, Captain Charles Robb, who was the President’s son-in-law. July 1968. Domestic opposition to the war was escalating. 

Leading the free world isn't always bicycle rides and soaking in specialized bathtubs. No doubt, many presidents must feel a great sense of relief when passing the torch to their successors.

As stated by James K. Polk, after leaving office,

"I feel exceedingly relieved that I am now free from all public cares. I am sure I shall be a happier man in my retirement than I have been during the four years I have filled the highest office in the gift of my countrymen. "

And in the American President essay about Benjamin Harrison,

"In 1892, the voters handed [Harrison's challenger, Grover] Cleveland the most decisive presidential victory in twenty years. Harrison told his family he felt as though he had been freed from prison."

How do you think you would deal with the pressure? 

Stay tuned! Every Friday we'll highlight an interesting item from presidential history.

Friday Feature: James K. Polk Riding a (Sickly) Tiger

James K. Polk, image is United States public domain.

An individual's personality and past experiences contribute in a significant way to their approach of public office. (And in the case of the presidency, it's a very public office.) For today's Friday Feature, here's an excerpt from the American President essay about James K. Polk.

The eldest of ten children, James K. Polk lived in a tidy and well-organized household supervised by a stern mother, Jane Knox Polk, who believed in raising her children according to the strict Presbyterian "gospel of duty." But he was not a healthy child. The trip west had taken its toll on him, and James suffered most of his youth from one sickness or another, especially gallstones. This, along with his staunch Calvinist upbringing and education in Presbyterian schools, accounts for James's determined and even unhealthy work ethic. He seemed to work and study as hard as possible to make up for his real or imagined physical defects.

Click through to read more from American President.

Friday Feature: Did you know?

In Barack Obama's biography, The Audacity of Hope, the figures he praised most, except for Franklin D. Roosevelt, were Republican icons: Alexander Hamilton, Abraham Lincoln, and Ronald Reagan.

Read more from a freshly-updated essay in American President.