Experts

Saikrishna Prakash

Fast Facts

  • James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School
  • Author of Imperial From the Beginning: The Constitution of the Original Executive
  • Clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas
  • Expertise on constitutional law, presidential powers, foreign relations law, war powers, emergency powers, separation of powers

Areas Of Expertise

  • Foreign Affairs
  • Domestic Affairs
  • Law and Justice
  • Governance
  • Political Parties and Movements
  • Politics
  • The Presidency
  • Supreme Court

Saikrishna Prakash, Faculty Senior Fellow, is the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Paul G. Mahoney Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. His scholarship focuses on separation of powers, particularly executive powers. He teaches Constitutional Law, Foreign Relations Law and Presidential Powers at the University of Virginia Law School.

Prakash majored in economics and political science at Stanford University. At Yale Law School, he served as senior editor of the Yale Law Journal and received the John M. Olin Fellowship in Law, Economics and Public Policy. After law school, he clerked for Judge Laurence H. Silberman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and for Justice Clarence Thomas of the U.S. Supreme Court. After practicing in New York for two years, he served as a visiting professor at the University of Illinois College of Law and as an associate professor at Boston University School of Law. He then spent several years at the University of San Diego School of Law as the Herzog Research Professor of Law. Prakash has been a visiting professor at the Northwestern University School of Law and the University of Chicago Law School. He also has served as a James Madison Fellow at Princeton University and Visiting Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

Among Prakash's articles are "50 States, 50 Attorneys General and 50 Approaches to the Duty to Defend," published in the Yale Law Journal; "The Imbecilic Executive," published in the Virginia Law Review; and "The Sweeping Domestic War Powers of Congress," published in the Michigan Law Review. He is the author of Imperial from the Beginning: The Constitution of the Original Executive (Yale University Press 2015).

Saikrishna Prakash News Feed

The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to take the place of Justice Anthony Kennedy was the subject of a forum at the Miller Center yesterday. Supreme Court expert Barbara Perry talked about the makeup of the new court with UVA law professors Saikrishna Prakash and Micah Schwartzman. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Saikrishna Prakash WMRA
President Donald Trump’s war of words with his Attorney General Jeff Sessions bled into day one of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings for Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
Saikrishna Prakash Las Vegas Review-Journal
"It's going to sound very much like the Clinton investigation all over again," noted Saikrishna Prakash of the University of Virginia's Miller Center.
Saikrishna Prakash Townhall
“Both sides got information from the Russians,” said Saikrishna Prakash of the University of Virginia’s Miller Center.
Saikrishna Prakash The Las Vegas Review-Journal
University of Virginia’s Miller Center Senior Fellow Saikrishna Prakash outlines what we should be thinking about when it comes to the Trump situation regarding Cohen and Manafort. He’s on “Charlottesville Right Now” with Les Sinclair. Saikrishna Prakash is a faculty senior fellow at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center and the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. His scholarship focuses on separation of powers, particularly executive powers. After law school, he clerked for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
Saikrishna Prakash WINA
“It’s really not that much different from the investigation,” says Saikrishna Prakash, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Virginia law school and a senior fellow at the school’s Miller Center of Public Affairs. “The indictment often follows an investigation. It doesn’t have any consequences for him serving as President.” That said, there’s nothing that would prevent Trump from being charged after he left office.
Saikrishna Prakash Time