Experts

Sidney Milkis

White Burkett Miller Professor of Governance and Foreign Affairs

Fast Facts

  • Author of Rivalry and Reform
  • White Burkett Miller Professor of Governance and Foreign Affairs
  • Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professor

 

Areas Of Expertise

  • Social Issues
  • Governance
  • Elections
  • Founding and Shaping of the Nation
  • Political Parties and Movements
  • Politics
  • The Presidency

Sidney M. Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor of Governance and Foreign Affairs, Cavaliers' Distinguished Teaching Professor, and professor of politics. His research focuses on the American presidency, political parties and elections, social movements, and American political development. In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate students, he regularly gives public lectures on American politics and participates in programs for international scholars and high school teachers that probe the deep historical roots of contemporary developments in the United States. 

Milkis has a BA degree from Muhlenberg College and a PhD in political science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Sidney Milkis News Feed

While both presidents are demagogues who faced impeachment, today’s political reality means that Trump can do more damage.
Sidney Milkis and Daniel Tichenor
Scholars and journalists have pored over Theodore Roosevelt for so long, it is difficult to imagine a contemporary author revealing anything novel about his life and times. Clay Risen’s “The Crowded Hour” takes on the challenge.
Sidney Milkis The Washington Post
Perhaps no President in American history has figured so prominently in the development of constitutional democracy as did Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Sidney Milkis Journal of Supreme Court History
Cues from party leaders count for less, as candidates build their own followings. Sid Milkis, a political scientist at the University of Virginia, argued that, for all their differences, Trump and Obama share something more than nontraditional résumés. “They see or saw themselves as heads of a movement. They didn’t just envision themselves as presidential candidates,” he said. “And secondly, both kept their distance — and you could say weakened — the official party organization.”
Sid Milkis The Washington Post
"Rivalry and Reform": Join the Miller Center's (& the University of Virginia's) Sid Milkis and the University of Oregon's Dan Tichenor as they discuss their new book from University of Chicago Press on how presidents and social movements try to use each other to achieve political ends. Lincoln, LBJ, and Reagan all serve as key examples of this fascinating dynamic.
Sidney Milkis Facebook
“You have not a [pure] democracy, but a republic accountable to people — but not immediate responsive to the people,” explains Sidney Milkis of the University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs, who spoke to TIME as part of a presidential-history partnership between TIME History and the Miller Center. “That’s why you have a third [of the Senate] turning over, so it doesn’t get too far removed from currents of public opinion.”
Sidney Milkis TIME