Events

Race in the decade since Obama

President Obama with a group of children, his arms outstretched

White House/Pete Souza

Race in the decade since Obama

Melody Barnes, Kevin Gaines, Lauretta Charlton

Tuesday, January 22, 2019
4:00PM - 5:30PM (EST)
Event Details

It's been a decade since President Barack Obama's inauguration. In those 10 years, how have things changed—or not changed—for people of color in the United States? Hear the Miller Center's Melody Barnes, UVA scholar Kevin Gaines, and The New York Times' Lauretta Charlton explore race in America today. Was the "post-racial" era a mirage? Have politics become more or less racialized in the past 10 years? Join us for this timely discussion by reserving a spot below.

This event is part of the 2019 Community MLK Celebration. It is also being held on the third annual National Day of Racial Healing, part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation effort—"a national and community-based process to plan for and bring about transformational and sustainable change, and to address the historical and contemporary effects of racism."

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When
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
4:00PM - 5:30PM (EST)
Add to Calendar 2019-01-22 16:00:00 2019-01-22 17:30:00 Race in the decade since Obama It's been a decade since President Barack Obama's inauguration. In those 10 years, how have things changed—or not changed—for people of color in the United States? Hear the Miller Center's Melody Barnes, UVA scholar Kevin Gaines, and The New York Times' Lauretta Charlton explore race in America today. Was the "post-racial" era a mirage? Have politics become more or less racialized in the past 10 years? Join us for this timely discussion by reserving a spot below. This event is part of the 2019 Community MLK Celebration. It is also being held on the third annual National Day of Racial Healing, part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation effort—"a national and community-based process to plan for and bring about transformational and sustainable change, and to address the historical and contemporary effects of racism." Newcomb Hall Theatre 180 McCormick Rd. Charlottesville, VA 22903 Miller Center millercenter@virginia.edu America/New_York public
Where
Newcomb Hall Theatre
180 McCormick Rd.
Charlottesville, VA 22903
Speakers
Melody Barnes

Melody Barnes

Barnes is Professor of Practice in Public Affairs and Co-director of the University of Virginia's Democracy Initiative. From January 2009 until January 2012, she was assistant to the president and director of the White House Domestic Policy Council in the Obama White House. Until July 2008, Barnes was the executive vice president for policy at the Center for American Progress, and she has also worked for Senator Edward M. Kennedy as chief counsel on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Kevin Gaines

Kevin Gaines

Gaines is the Julian Bond Professor of Civil Rights and Social Justice, with a joint appointment in the Corcoran Department of History and the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. He is author of Uplifting the Race: Black Leadership, Politics, and Culture During the Twentieth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 1996), which was awarded the American Studies Association’s John Hope Franklin Book Prize. 

Lauretta Charlton

Lauretta Charlton

Charlton is the editor of Race/Related, the New York Times' editorial group covering racial issues. She came to the Times from the New Yorker, where she spearheaded digital initiatives such as "The Current," "The New Yorker Recommends," and the "Listening Booth.” Previously, at New York magazine, she wrote a regular music column, and at the Public Theater, she organized an event for visual artists to collaborate with musicians during live performances at Joe’s Pub.