Experts

William J. Antholis

Fast Facts

  • Former managing director at The Brookings Institution
  • Director of international economic affairs for the National Security Council in the Clinton Administration
  • Expertise on climate change, India, China, international economics, development, U.S. foreign policy

Areas Of Expertise

  • Foreign Affairs
  • Asia
  • Domestic Affairs
  • Energy and the Environment
  • Science and Technology
  • Economic Issues
  • Trade
  • Elections
  • Politics
  • The Presidency

William J. Antholis serves as Director and CEO of the Miller Center, a nonpartisan affiliate of the University of Virginia that specializes in presidential scholarship, public policy, and political history.

Immediately prior, he served as managing director at The Brookings Institution from 2004 to 2014. In that capacity, he worked directly with Brookings' president and vice presidents to help manage the full range of policy studies, develop new initiatives, coordinate research across programs, strengthen the policy impact of Brookings’ research, and ensure the quality and independence of that research. On behalf of Brookings’ president, he also worked directly with Brookings’ board of trustees and a range of university, philanthropic, and other institutional partners. He was a resident Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, where his work focused on the politics and institutions of international diplomacy.

Antholis is the author of the book Inside Out India and China: Local Politics Go Global. It explores how country-sized provinces and states in the world’s two biggest nations are increasingly becoming global players. Along with Brookings’ President Strobe Talbott, he is the author of Fast Forward: Ethics and Politics in the Age of Global Warming. He has published articles, book chapters, and opinion pieces on U.S. politics, U.S. foreign policy, international organizations, the G8, climate change, and trade.

From 1995 to 1999, Antholis served in government. At the White House, he was director of international economic affairs on the staff of the National Security Council and National Economic Council, where he served as the chief staff person for the G8 Summits in 1997 and 1998. He also was deputy director of the White House climate change policy team. At the State Department, he served on the policy planning staff and in the economic affairs bureau. Prior to joining Brookings, he served for five years as director of studies and senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund, a U.S. grant-making and public policy institution devoted to strengthening transatlantic cooperation. In that capacity, Antholis was project director of the Trade and Poverty Forum, a six-country dialogue of leading citizens and legislators focused on using the global economy to address persistent global poverty and inequality. He was also an international affairs fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations and a visiting fellow at the Center of International Studies at Princeton University.

In 1991, Antholis co-founded the Civic Education Project, a nonprofit organization that supported western-trained social science instructors at universities in 23 Central and Eastern European countries. He served on its board of trustees until 2007, when it was absorbed by the Central Eastern European University.

Antholis earned his PhD from Yale University in politics (1993) and his BA degree from the University of Virginia in government and foreign affairs (1986).

William J. Antholis News Feed

John Podesta and Todd Stern, two former Obama Administration officials discuss how the United States might address climate change with foreign policy measures. They argue for “a full mobilization at home and an unhesitating commitment to leadership abroad” along with a willingness to use American “political capital and economic resources to drive the decarbonization of the global economy.”
William Antholis Miller Center Presents
The Partnership for Public Service’s Center for Presidential Transition will host a virtual event on presidential transitions in association with the George & Barbara Bush Foundation, the Clinton Presidential Center, the George W. Bush Presidential Center, the Obama Foundation, and the Miller Center. This non-partisan event will focus on the importance of a safe and effective presidential transition to first-term and second-term administrations and feature perspectives on transition planning, managing transitions during crises and the complexities of shifting from campaigning to governing.
William Antholis Miller Center Presents
The coming political crisis is critical because it is so unique and troubling, and affects all of the others. Whether the new president is Donald Trump or Joe Biden, a great many Americans may not accept the election’s outcome.
USA Today
Since 1776, the United States has been at war 93 percent of the time—227 out of 244 years, according to Global Research. Why is that? And what does it mean for the future of our nation, at home and abroad? This half-day public conference will focus on the roots, management, and direction of so-called “endless wars.” During the five sessions, speakers will consider the political, legal, military, cultural, and governance implications of remaining engaged in these indefinite conflicts, and the future prospects of fighting a “forever war."
William Antholis Miller Center Presents
Join renowned journalist John Dickerson for a conversation about his new book, The Hardest Job in the World: The American Presidency, moderated by Miller Center Director Bill Antholis. In this eye-opening book, Dickerson writes about presidents in history such as Washington, Lincoln, FDR, and Eisenhower, and in contemporary times—LBJ, Reagan, Bush, Obama, and Trump—to show how a complex job has been done and why we need to reevaluate what we expect from them once they are in office.
William Antholis Miller Center Presents
“Our living presidency subverts the idea of an executive subject to the Constitution and to the laws,” writes Saikrishna Prakash in his new book, The Living Presidency, from Harvard University Press. “If presidents can unilaterally alter the Constitution, they can circumvent the document that spells out and limits their authority. The president’s express obligation to ‘preserve, protect and defend the Constitution’ becomes irrelevant in the face of a practical power to alter, undermine, and subvert the Constitution.” Prakash, a UVA Law professor and Miller Center senior fellow, discusses his pointed and strikingly relevant critique of the modern presidency in a discussion hosted by Miller Center Director William Antholis.
William Antholis Miller Center Presents