Experts

Aynne Kokas

Fast Facts

  • Non-resident scholar at Rice University’s Baker Institute of Public Policy
  • Term member of the Council on Foreign Relations
  • Fellow in the National Committee on United States-China Relations’ Public Intellectuals Program
  • Expertise on U.S.-China relations, cybersecurity, media industry

Areas Of Expertise

  • Foreign Affairs
  • Asia
  • Domestic Affairs
  • Media and the Press
  • Science and Technology

Aynne Kokas is an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Virginia. Kokas’ research examines Sino-U.S. media and technology relations. Her book Hollywood Made in China (University of California Press, 2017) argues that Chinese investment and regulations have transformed the U.S. commercial media industry, most prominently in the case of media conglomerates’ leverage of global commercial brands. Her project at the Wilson Center, Border Control on the Digital Frontier: China, the United States, and the Global Battle for Data Security, examines the cybersecurity policy implications of the Sino-U.S. data trade.

Kokas is a non-resident scholar at Rice University’s Baker Institute of Public Policy, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a fellow in the National Committee on United States-China Relations’ Public Intellectuals Program. Her writing and commentary appear regularly in media outlets including the BBC, CNBC, NPR’s Marketplace, The Washington Post, and Wired.

Aynne Kokas News Feed

Academics traveling to China have long made use of VPNs, but unauthorized internet connections are now illegal in China as well as in Russia, said Aynne Kokas, an associate professor of media studies at the University of Virginia.
Aynne Kokas The Chronicle of Higher Education
"We are seeing a redistribution in the market where a lot of smaller firms are failing because of the pandemic," said Aynne Kokas, author of "Hollywood Made in China" and a media studies professor at the University of Virginia. "Larger Chinese studios tend to be more conservative in their choices."
Aynne Kokas Nikkei Asian Review
Director Alfonso Cuarón told China Daily that the plotline was driven not by marketing concerns but by the small number of countries that had active space programs. “We had to base it upon elements in space at the time,” he said. “That may very well be true,” said Aynne Kokas, an associate professor of media studies at the University of Virginia and the author of “Hollywood Made in China.” But she notes that the notion of China as a benevolent space power is a narrative that resonates with the Chinese Communist Party.
Aynne Kokas The Intercept
Aynne Kokas, Abe fellow and associate professor of media studies at the University of Virginia who specializes in U.S.-China media and tech relations, noted in an interview that the proposed ownership structure as detailed by ByteDance is short of previous executive branch statements around ownership.
Aynne Kokas S&P Global Market Intelligence
This week on “Plugged In with Greta Van Susteren" for September 16, 2020: “China vs. Hollywood.” The China factor and Hollywood’s high stakes battle for your entertainment dollars. Is the live action remake of the Disney classic “Mulan” a sign of things to come? Media and entertainment experts weigh in on China’s growing clout as they talk to Greta about what Hollywood is prepared to do to own a slice of the lucrative Chinese movie market.
Aynne Kokas VOA News
“The way the villains are discussed, the placeless-ness of the west of China, the sumptuousness and the perfection of the imperial city — there’s this rewriting in order to fit a very specific imperial narrative,” Aynne Kokas, the author of “Hollywood Made in China,” said in a telephone interview. “Hollywood has a very illustrious history of making faceless, Turkic villains itself, so it’s almost the perfect collaboration.”
Aynne Kokas The New York Times