Experts

Aynne Kokas

Fast Facts

  • Non-resident scholar at Rice University’s Baker Institute of Public Policy
  • Term member of the Council on Foreign Relations
  • Fellow in the National Committee on United States-China Relations’ Public Intellectuals Program
  • Expertise on U.S.-China relations, cybersecurity, media industry

Areas Of Expertise

  • Foreign Affairs
  • Asia
  • Domestic Affairs
  • Media and the Press
  • Science and Technology

Aynne Kokas is an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Virginia. Kokas’ research examines Sino-U.S. media and technology relations. Her book Hollywood Made in China (University of California Press, 2017) argues that Chinese investment and regulations have transformed the U.S. commercial media industry, most prominently in the case of media conglomerates’ leverage of global commercial brands. Her project at the Wilson Center, Border Control on the Digital Frontier: China, the United States, and the Global Battle for Data Security, examines the cybersecurity policy implications of the Sino-U.S. data trade.

Kokas is a non-resident scholar at Rice University’s Baker Institute of Public Policy, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a fellow in the National Committee on United States-China Relations’ Public Intellectuals Program. Her writing and commentary appear regularly in media outlets including the BBC, CNBC, NPR’s Marketplace, The Washington Post, and Wired.

Aynne Kokas News Feed

"I think this poses a dire situation for Hollywood," said Professor Aynne Kokas at the University of Virginia, the author of Hollywood Made In China, about the complicated relationship between the two entities. "There definitely will be a trickle-back effect. It's a very dangerous financial position to be reliant on Chinese box office to recoup profits."
Aynne Kokas The Straits Times
“I think this poses a dire situation for Hollywood,” said Aynne Kokas, a professor at the University of Virginia and author of “Hollywood Made In China,” about the complicated relationship between the two entities. “There definitely will be a trickle-back effect. It’s a very dangerous financial position to be reliant on Chinese box office to recoup profits.”
Aynne Kokas The Washington Post