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Aug
28
12:00PM

Inside the Iran Nuclear Deal with the Lead U.S. Negotiator

Wendy Sherman

August 28, 2015, 12:00PM

Wendy Sherman

This program will not be web streamed. 

Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Sept. 13, 2015 / Nationally, Sept. 16, 2015

PLEASE NOTE TIME OF PROGRAM 12:00 NOON

Wendy Sherman, former undersecretary for political affairs and lead U.S. negotiator with Iran as the Obama administration has pursued a nuclear agreement. A former social worker, she also served as the director for EMILY's List, a political fundraising group aimed at getting pro-choice Democratic women elected. She first served in the State Department under the Clinton administration. She was appointed to her current position in 2011 by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Aug
26
11:00AM
Ryan Lizza

Television Broadcast:  Virginia, Sept. 20, 2015 / Nationally, Sept. 23, 2015

Ryan Lizza is the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker and an on-air contributor for CNN. Before joining The New Yorker in 2007, he served as political correspondent for The New Republic, correspondent for GQ, and contributing editor for New York. Lizza has also written for the New York TimesWashington Monthly, and The Atlantic. Since 1998, he has covered most of the country’s major political stories, including the last four presidential campaigns, and has written many political profiles for The New Yorker. His awards include the 2012 National Press Club’s Hood Award for Diplomatic Correspondence and the White House Correspondents’ Association’s Aldo Beckman Memorial Award. 

May
18
11:00AM
Orlando Patterson

Part of a new American Forum special series, What Now? Dialogues on Race in America

Television Broadcast: June 7, 2015

National Book Award winner ORLANDO PATTERSON, one of the nation’s leading sociologists, takes on a long-running debate over the causes of economic distress for inner-city America. Is it centuries of racism and discrimination against African Americans? Is it a failure of government policy since the Civil Rights movement? Or as New York magazine recently asked: does the real problem lie in “what black communities are doing to themselves”?  In his new book, The Cultural Matrix: Understanding Black Youth, Patterson seeks to unravel a uniquely American paradox: the socioeconomic crisis, segregation, and social isolation of disadvantaged black youth, on one hand, and their extraordinary integration and prominence in popular culture on the other. Patterson is the John Cowles Professor of Sociology at Harvard University and the author of Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study and The Ordeal of Integration: Progress and Resentment in America’s “Racial” Crisis. He has served as a special advisor for social policy and development to Prime Minister Michael Manley of Jamaica and is a founding member of Cultural Survival, one of the leading advocacy groups for the rights of indigenous peoples. His columns have appeared in Time, Newsweek, The New Republic, and the Washington Post. He is the recipient of many awards, including the National Book Award for Non-Fiction, the Ralph Bunche Award for the best book on pluralism, and the Order of Distinction by the Government of Jamaica.  Photo Credit: Stu Rosner

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

May
11
11:00AM

American Forum - Neither Left nor Right:  A Different Approach on Race

Fredrick C. Harris, Robert C. Lieberman

May 11, 2015, 11:00AM

Fredrick C. HarrisRobert C. Lieberman

Part of a new American Forum special series in Spring 2015

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America

Television Broadcast: May 31, 2014

FREDRICK C. HARRIS and ROBERT C. LIEBERMAN are the co-authors of Beyond Discrimination: Racial Discrimination in a Post-Racist Era. Harris is professor of political science and directs the Center on African-American Politics and Society at Columbia University. His research interests include American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. Harris’s books include Something Within: Religion in African-American Political Activism and The Price of the Ticket: Barack Obama and the Rise and Fall of Black Politics. His essays have appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, and the London Review of Books. As provost of Johns Hopkins University, Lieberman is responsible for promoting and coordinating the university’s teaching and research mission. He previously served as interim dean of Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and as professor of political science and public affairs. Lieberman is a well-known scholar on issues of race and politics in America, social welfare policy, and the welfare state. His books include Shifting the Color Line: Race and the American Welfare State and Shaping Race Policy: The United States in Comparative Perspective.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

May
8
12:15PM

Fellow: R. Joseph Parrott, History, University of Texas-Austin
Mentor: Robert McMahon, Ralph D. Mershon Distinguished Professor of History, Ohio State University

Fellow: Simon Stevens, History, Columbia University
Mentor: Saul Dubow, Professor of History, Queen Mary University

Moderator: Professor John Edwin Mason, Associate Professor of History, University of Virginia

May
8
9:15AM

Will Hitchcock Professor of History and Director of Academic Programs and Research at the Miller Center, University of Virginia

Reviewer: Kathryn Cramer Brownell, Assistant Professor of History, Purdue University

Reviewer: Kenneth Osgood, Professor of History, Director of the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs, Colorado School of Mines.

Reviewer: Mel Leffler, Edward Stettinius Professor of History, University of Virginia

Moderator: Sidney Milkis, White Burkett Professor of Politics and Miller Center Faculty Associate, University of Virginia

May
7
2:30PM

Fellow: Evan McCormick, History, University of Virginia
Mentor: Gilbert Joseph, Professor of History, Yale University

Fellow: Adam Goodman, History, University of Pennsylvania
Mentor: Geraldo Cadava, Assistant Professor of History, Northwestern University

Moderator: Cristina Lopez-Gottardi Chao, Research Director for Public and Policy Programs, Miller Center

May
7
12:00PM

Fellow: Judge Glock, History, Rutgers University
Mentor: Eric Rauchway, Professor of History, University of California-Davis

Fellow: David Reinecke, Sociology, Princeton University (Reinecke is the Ambrose Monnell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy)
Mentor: Richard John, Professor of History and Communications, Columbia University

Moderator: Guian McKee, Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of Virginia; Presidential Recordings Program, Miller Center

May
7
9:15AM

Fellow: Betsy Beasley, American Studies, Yale University
Mentor: Robert Vitalis, Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Fellow: Emily Pears, Politics, University of Virginia
Mentor: Emily Zackin, Assistant Professor of Political Science, The Johns Hopkins University

Moderator: Sarah Milov, Assistant Professor of History, University of Virginia

May
7
9:15AM

2015 Spring Fellows Conference

May 7, 2015 - May 8, 2015

Every year, the Miller Center Fellowship Program supports the completion of promising dissertations that employ history to shed light on American politics and public policy, foreign relations and the impact of global affairs on the United States, media and politics, and the role of the presidency in shaping American political development. 

Fellows are required to participate in the annual spring conference where they present their research and findings to scholars from the Miller Center and the University of Virginia.  During the conference each fellow’s dissertation is critiqued by his or her dream mentor and Miller Center and University of Virginia scholars. 

Click to download the full agenda (PDF). 

May
6
11:00AM
Peter Bergen

Part of a new American Forum special series in Spring 2015

The Aftermath of the Endless War

Television Broadcast: May 24, 2015

PETER BERGEN is a journalist, documentary producer, and the author of four books about al-Qaeda, three of which were New York Times best sellers. Bergen is the co-editor of Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, and Policy, a series of essays by legal scholars, journalists, government officials, military analysts, social scientists, and foreign policy experts. The book addresses drones' impact on the ground, how their use adheres to and challenges the laws of war, their relationship to complex policy challenges, and the ways they help us understand the future of war. Bergen serves as the director of the national security program at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C., and as CNN's national security analyst.

This event is part of…

Aftermath of the Endless War: This series of American Forum episodes examined the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and features conversations with several military, political, and diplomatic experts.

Apr
24
12:00AM
Vesla M. Weaver

This program airs on April 26 and is a re-broadcast of a previous episode of American Forum. Check your local listings for details. 

VESLA M. WEAVER serves as assistant professor of political science and African American Studies at Yale. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor of politics at the University of Virginia and a Miller Center faculty associate. Weaver is interested in understanding racial inequality in the United States, how state policies shape citizenship, and the political causes and consequences of the U.S. criminal justice system's growth. Her newest book (with Amy Lerman), Arresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control, explores the effects of increasing punishment and surveillance in America on democratic inclusion, particularly for the black urban poor. Weaver is also the co-author of Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Apr
22
11:00AM
William H. Frey

Part of a new American Forum special series in Spring 2015 What Now? Dialogues on Race in America

Television Broadcast: May 10, 2014

In his most recent book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America, demographer WILLIAM H. FREY interprets and expounds on the dramatic growth of minority populations in the United States. He finds that without these expanding groups, America could face a bleak future: this new generation of young minorities, who are having children at a faster rate than whites, is infusing our aging labor force with vitality and innovation. Frey, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, is known for his research on urban populations, migration, immigration, race, aging, political demographics, and his expertise on the U.S. Census. He was the first to predict that 2011 would be the first year in which more minority babies than white babies were born.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Apr
21
3:30PM
Mark Stoler

MARK STOLER, professor emeritus of history at the University of Vermont, has served as a distinguished visiting professor of American foreign policy at Williams College and the Griffith ’52 visiting professor at Washington and Lee University. His publications include Allies and Adversaries: the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Grand Alliance, and U.S. Strategy in World War II; The Politics of the Second Front: American Military Planning and Diplomacy in Coalition Warfare, 1941-1943; George C. Marshall: Soldier-Statesman of the American Century; and Allies in War: Britain and America against the Axis Powers, 1940-1945

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: Organized by U.Va. historians Melvyn Leffler and William Hitchcock, the 2015 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a century of war, economic crisis, and American global expansion. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Apr
15
11:00AM

American Forum - Mercenaries or Patriots: Privatizing American Security

Ann Hagedorn, Erik Prince

April 15, 2015, 11:00AM

Ann HagedornErik Prince

Television Broadcast: May 3, 2015

ANN HAGEDORN, author of The Invisible Soldiers: How America Outsourced Our Security, and ERIK PRINCE, founder of the famously controversial Blackwater private-security company, discuss and debate whether the U.S. has made a mistake in its growing reliance on private para-military operators. Prince is the author of the new book, Civilian Warriors: The Inside Story of Blackwater and the Unsung Heroes of the War on Terror. Hagedorn is a former reporter at the Wall Street Journal and instructor at Northwestern University and Columbia University. Her book examines private military and security companies that have profited from the trend, and profiles members of Congress who see dangers in the practice but have been unable to limit it.  Photo Credit for Ann Hagedorn, Jeanie Wulfkuhiefor; for Erik Prince, Bingo Rimér

Apr
10
12:30PM

The Politics of High Tech Societies

Lily Geismer

April 10, 2015, 12:30PM

Lily Geismer

Since World War II, U.S. metropolitan areas have been transformed by the emergence of a high-tech economy. From Silicon Valley to Massachusetts’s Route 128 corridor, these changes have reshaped the political identity and behavior of the communities that form the core of the new knowledge-based economy. Connected as much by professional identity and national and global networks as by commitment to place, the knowledge workers who occupy these high-tech spaces have become increasingly significant for American politics. On Friday, April 10 at 12:30 pm, the Miller Center’s GREAT ISSUES program will explore these issues through a discussion of Don’t Blame Us: Suburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party by former Miller Center National Fellow LILY GEISMER. Don’t Blame Us explores how knowledge workers in the high-tech spaces of the Route 128 corridor helped reorient the Democratic Party towards a new suburban liberalism during the 1970s and 1980s. Geismer argues that rather than being an exception, these high-tech Massachusetts liberals were representative of trends in metropolitan areas around the country that have shaped American politics ever since. 

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

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