Miller Center

Recent Events

Click to View Upcoming Miller Center Events

Feb
3
11:00AM
Charlie Savage

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, February 21, 2016/Nationally, February 24, 2016

Charlie Savage is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Washington correspondent for the New York Times. His new book, Power Wars, is an acclaimed journalist’s behind-the-scenes account of a momentous post-9/11 presidency. Savage’s book is one of the first comprehensive histories both of how secret American surveillance developed over the past 35 years, and an inside account of the Obama era, including his own reporting from the U.S. terrorist detention center at Guantanamo Bay, detailed accounts of closed-door meetings at the highest levels of power, previously undisclosed secret memos, and vivid portraits of powerful officials whose names have rarely appeared in the press but who exercised great influence over the nation and the world. A book signing will follow the taping of American Forum.

Jan
27
11:00AM

American Forum - Is Public Education Doomed?

Dale Russakoff, Robert Pianta

January 27, 2016, 11:00AM

Dale RussakoffRobert Pianta

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia-February 14 , 2016/Nationally-February 17, 2016

The Prize: Who's in Charge of America's Schools?  by Dale Russakoff first serialized in The New Yorker, is the story of how New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, and now-U.S. Corey Booker joined together in a public-private partnership to transform the failing urban public schools of Newark, N.J.—and utterly failed.

Dale Russakoff spent twenty-eight years as a reporter for the Washington Post, covering politics, education, social policy, and other topics. From 1994 to 2008, she served in the Post’s New York Bureau, which included covering the NYC metropolitan area, including Newark, N.J. She grew up in Birmingham, Alabama and credits her parents with encouraging her to question the politics of the world around her, particularly the racial segregation and inequity in her own hometown. A book signing will follow her appearance. Photo Credit: Sarah Weiser

Dr. Robert Pianta, is the Dean of the Curry School of Education, Novartis US Foundation Professor of Education, and Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia.  He is also founding director of the Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning.  Pianta's research and policy interests focus on the measurement and production of effective teaching in classrooms from preschool to high school.  Pianta has authored more than 200 scholarly papers and several influential books related to teaching and the intersection of education and human development.  He is past Editor of The Journal of School Psychology and incoming associate editor for the new journal AERA Open. Pianta consults regularly with foundations as well as state and Federal agencies including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, and the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services.

Jan
21
3:30PM

Thomas Jefferson’s Electoral Revolution of 1800

Alan Taylor

January 21, 2016, 3:30PM

Alan Taylor

Alan Taylor is the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Professor at the University of Virginia. His books include The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832; William Cooper's Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic; and The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian AlliesWilliam Cooper’s Town won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize, in addition to the Bancroft and Beveridge prizes. His most recent book, The Internal Enemy, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2014.

This event will be moderated by Edward Ayers, former president of the University of Richmond and co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys.  

 

This event will be live tweeted by @POTUStudies. Use #Election1800 to join the conversation. 

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Jan
20
11:00AM
Michael Eric Dyson

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, February 7, 2016/Nationally, February 10, 2016

Michael Dyson is a New York Times op-ed contributor, MSNBC political analyst, and a professor in the Sociology Department at Georgetown University He has been named by Ebony as one of the most influential black Americans and is the author of 17 books. His upcoming book, The Black Presidency, is a provocative look—sharply critical at times, affirming at others—into the legacy and meaning of America's first black presidency. Photo Credit: Nina Subin

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Jan
13
11:00AM

American Forum - The International Migrant Crisis and How the World Can Respond

Kathleen Newland, David Leblang

January 13, 2016, 11:00AM

Kathleen NewlandDavid Leblang

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, January 31, 2016/Nationally, February 3 , 2016

Kathleen Newland is a Senior Fellow and Co-Founder of the Migration Policy Institute where she focuses on the relationship between migration and development, the governance of international migration, and refugee protection. Prior to this appointment, Newland worked for the Carnegie Endowment for international Peace, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, World Bank, and the office of the Secretary-General of the United Nations.

David Leblang, a political economis,  is a Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia and J. Wilson Newman Professor of Governance at the Miller Center. Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense. He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and is currently working on two projects – the first focuses on how sending countries "harness" the human and material resources of their diasporas while the second is a study of the politics and policies that constrain the mobility of labor across states and nations.

Dec
16
11:00AM
Charles Murray

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia-January 17, 2016/Nationally-January 20, 2016

In Charles Murray’s newest book, By the People, the sometimes controversial author gives a spirited rebuke to government overreach, and proposes a campaign of non-violent civil disobedience in which citizens would simply refuse to follow many federal and state regulations. He argues that Americans are wrongfully and routinely obstructed by government as they run businesses, practice a vocation, raise families, or follow their religious beliefs.  Murray is the W. H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He came to national attention in 1984 with Losing Ground, and in 1994, with The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life, written with Richard Herrnstein.

Dec
10
11:00AM

American Forum - The Dysfunction of American Justice

Brandon L. Garrett

December 10, 2015, 11:00AM

Brandon L. Garrett

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia-January 24, 2016/Nationally-January 27, 2016

Brandon Garrett, is the Roy L. and Rosamond Woodruff Morgan Professor of Law at the University of Virginia where he teaches criminal procedure, wrongful convictions, habeas corpus, corporate crime, civil rights, and constitutional law. Garrett is also the author of Too Big to Jail (2014) and Convicting the innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong (2011). Together they explore the many ways our justice system is broken and what we can do to fix it.  Photo Credit: Ian Bradshaw

Dec
2
3:30PM
Thomas Blanton

This event is open to the public, no RSVP is required.

Thomas S. Blanton is director of the National Security Archive at The George Washington University in Washington D.C., where he oversees the archive’s more than 32,000 Freedom of Information Act requests. He is the author of White House E-Mail: The Top Secret Computer Messages the Reagan-Bush White House Tried to Destroy. He co-authored The Chronology on the Iran-contra affair, and served as a contributing author to three editions of the ACLU’s authoritative guide, Litigation Under the Federal Open Government Laws, and to the Brookings Institution study, Atomic Audit: The Costs and Consequences of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Since 1940

 

This event will be live tweeted. Please follow Niki Hemmer @pastpunditry and @POTUStudies for a live tweetchat.

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Dec
2
11:00AM
Marc Solomon

PBS World Channel Broadcast:  Virginia-January 3, 2016/Nationally-January 6, 2016

In Winning Marriage, Marc Solomon, a veteran leader in the movement for marriage equality and national campaign director for Freedom to Marry, gives the reader a seat at the strategy-setting and decision-making table in the campaign that led to the historic Supreme Court Ruling. He reveals the inner workings of the advocacy movement that has won legislative, court, and electoral battles over the 12 years since the landmark Massachusetts ruling guaranteeing marriage for same-sex couples for the first time. He is a graduate of Yale and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. A book signing will follow his appearance. Photo credit: Zachary Tyler Newton.

Nov
10
11:00AM

American Forum - Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice

Adam Benforado

November 10, 2015, 11:00AM

Adam Benforado

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 13, 2015/Nationally-December 16, 2015

Weaving together historical examples, scientific studies, and compelling court cases—from the border collie put on trial in Kentucky to the five teenagers who falsely confessed in the Central Park Jogger case, Adam Benforado, an associate professor of law at Drexel University, argues that our judicial processes fail to uphold our values and protect society’s weakest members. He  lays out the scope of the legal system’s dysfunction and proposes a wealth of practical reforms that could prevent injustice and help us achieve true fairness and equality before the law.  Photo credit: Joe Craig.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

Nov
7
7:00PM
Oliver Stone

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia-December 6, 2015/Nationally-December 9, 2015

A conversation with Academy Award-winning director, producer, and writer Oliver Stone.

Nov
2
10:45AM

Panel 2:  McCurdy Fellow Panel

 

  • Sarah Seo, Princeton University Department of History, “The Automobile and the Cold War Fourth Amendment”
  • Nora Krinitsky, University of Michigan Department of History, “Beer Wars and Black Votes: Policing the Color Line in Interwar Chicago”
  • Risa Goluboff, University of Virginia School of Law, Comment
  • David Sklansky, Stanford Law School, Comment
  • Moderator: Sarah Barringer Gordon, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Nov
1
9:00AM

Panel 1: Federalism and Ideas of Sovereignty

 

  • Kate Brown, Huntington University Department of History and Political Science, “Founding Federalism:  Alexander Hamilton’s Concurrent Constitutionalism”
  • Lindsay Robertson, University of Oklahoma College of Law, “Restoring Relations with Five Nations after the Civil War: The Fort Smith Conference and the Legal Complexities of Post-Civil War Indian Treaty Rights” 
  • Cynthia L. Nicoletti, University of Virginia School of Law, "Reimagining the Union: The Contours of Federalism after the Civil War”
  • J. Gordon Hylton, University of Virginia School of Law, “The Fuller Court and the State Police Power: A Quantitation Study in the History of Federalism”
  • Bernie D. Jones, Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, “The ‘New Federalism’ and Current Challenges to Legal Historiography” 
  • Moderator: Hendrik Hartog, Princeton University History Department
Nov
1
9:00AM

The Legacy of Charles W. McCurdy

November 1, 2015 - November 2, 2015

This conference celebrates and explores the legacy of Charles W. McCurdy on a scholarly and personal level. It also serves to inaugurate the Charles W. McCurdy Fellowship in Legal History at the Miller Center and School of Law. During a 40-year career in the Corcoran Department of History and the School of Law, McCurdy has been the intellectual and pedagogical heart of legal history at the University of Virginia. His scholarship earned him the 2003 Order of the Coif Triennial Book Award for “The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865.” His teaching has earned him not only official recognition but, more importantly, claim to having directed or advised more than 200 doctoral dissertations, master’s theses, and undergraduate theses.

Click here for a full schedule of events.

Oct
28
8:00AM

American Forum - Will Syria Be Barack Obama’s Vietnam?

Frederik Logevall

October 28, 2015, 8:00AM

Frederik Logevall

PBS Television Broadcast:  Virginia-November 29, 2015/Nationally-December 2, 2015

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History at Harvard University. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won four prizes, including the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

Oct
27
3:30PM
Fredrik Logevall

This event is open to the public. 

Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History at Harvard University. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won four prizes, including the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

This event will be live tweeted. You can join the conversation by following @POTUStudies and Ken Hughes @FatalPolitics with #AgonyofVietnam.  

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Page 1 of 107 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

View the full event archive >>