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May
26
4:15PM

American Forum - American Cauldron: Race and the First Year of the Next Presidency

Michael E. Dyson, Elizabeth Hinton

May 26, 2016, 4:15PM

Michael E. DysonElizabeth Hinton

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, June 26, 2016/Nationally, June 29, 2016

Michael Dyson is a New York Times op-ed contributor, MSNBC political analyst, and a professor in the Sociology Department at Georgetown University He has been named by Ebony as one of the most influential black Americans and is the author of 17 books. His current book, The Black Presidency, is a provocative look—sharply critical at times, affirming at others—into the legacy and meaning of America's first black presidency. Photo Credit: Nina Subin

Elizabeth Hinton is an assistant professor in the Department of History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Her research focus on the persistence of poverty and racial inequality in the 20th century united States. In her current book, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: the Making of Mass Incarceration in America she examines the implementation of federal law enforcement programs beginning in the mid-1960s that laid the groundwork for the mass incarceration of American citizens. A book signing will follow their appearance.

This event is part of…

What Now? Dialogues on Race in America: This series of American Forum episodes explores both historical and current race-related issues that have troubled the nation.

May
19
11:00AM
Jacob HackerPaul Pierson

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, June 29, 2016/Nationally, June 22, 2016

Jacob S. Hacker is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science at Yale University. A Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C., he is the author of The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream, The Divided Welfare State, and, with Paul Pierson, of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led us To Forget What Made America Prosper, Prosperity; Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer—and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class; Off Center: The Republican Revolution and the Erosion of American Democracy. He has appeared recently on The NewsHour, MSNBC, All Things Considered, and Marketplace. Photo Credit: Harold Shapiro

Paul Pierson is the John Gross Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley. He is the author of Politics in Time, Dismantling the Welfare State?, and (with Jacob S. Hacker), American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led us To Forget What Made America Prosper; Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer—and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class; Off Center: The Republican Revolution and the Erosion of American Democracy. His commentary has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and The New Republic. A book signing will follow their appearance. Photo Credit: Jennifer Graham

May
13
1:30PM

Taming Technologies – 1:30 pm
Fellow: Jonathon Free, History, Duke University
“Redistributing Risk: The Political Ecology of Coal in Late-Twentieth Century Appalachia”
(Free is the Miller Center/Hagley Library Dissertation Fellow in Business and Politics)
Mentor: Richard White, Professor of American History, Stanford University

Fellow: Sarah Robey, History, Temple University
“Atomic America: The Expert Public and the Cold War, 1958-1963”
(Robey is the Ambrose Monell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy)
Mentor: Brian Balogh, Professor of History, University of Virginia

Moderator: Bernard Carlson, Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia

 

Conference Concludes – 3:00 pm

May
13
11:45AM

Policing Mobility– 11:45 am (Lunch Panel)

Fellow: Nora Krinitsky, History, University of Michigan
“Lawlessness in Law Enforcement: Police Violence and the Chicago NAACP Campaign Against Brutality”
Mentor: Kelly Lytle Hernandez, Associate Professor of History, University of California Los Angeles

Fellow: Sarah Seo, History, Princeton University
“Rule of Law and the Culture of Due Process”
(Seo is the Charles McCurdy Fellow in Legal History)
Mentor: David Sklansky, Professor of Law, Stanford Law School

Moderator: Sarah Milov, Assistant Professor of History, University of Virginia

May
13
10:00AM

Branding Parties and Cities – 10:00 am
Fellow: Boris Heersink, Politics, University of Virginia
“Beyond Service: National Party Organizations and Party Brands in American Politics”
Mentor: Richard Valelly, Professor of Political Science, Swarthmore College

Fellow: Benjamin Holtzman, History, Brown University
“Promoting Development during Crisis: Tax Incentives and New Markets in 1970s New York”
Mentor: Suleiman Osman, Associate Professor of American Studies, The George Washington University

Moderator: Sidney Milkis, Professor of Politics and Faculty Associate at the Miller Center, University of Virginia

May
12
2:30PM
Conference - “2016 Spring Fellows Conference”

Michael Flamm Manuscript Review: “In the Heat of the Summer”

Michael Flamm, Garnette Cadogan, Michael Fortner, Claudrena Harold

May 12, 2016, 2:30PM

Michael FlammGarnette CadoganMichael FortnerClaudrena Harold

Michael Flamm: Chair, Department of History, Ohio Wesleyan University

Garnette Cadogan: Visiting Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia and Visiting Scholar, Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University

Michael Fortner: Assistant Professor and Academic Director of Urban Studies, City University of New York

Claudrena Harold: Associate Professor of History, University of Virginia

Moderator: Andrew Kahrl, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Virginia

May
12
12:30PM

Fellow: Noel Anderson, Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
"Competitive Intervention, Protracted Conflict, and the Global Prevalence of Civil War"
Mentor: Stathis Kalyvas, Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Fellow: Shannon Nix, History, University of Virginia
“Losing Nicaragua: Human Rights Politics and U.S. Attempts to Manage the Nicaraguan Revolution”
Mentor: William Schmidli, Assistant Professor of History, Bucknell University

Moderator: Todd Sechser, Associate Professor, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia

May
12
10:30AM

Fellow: Elizabeth Ingleson, History, University of Sydney
"Inadvertent Agents of Diplomacy: American Importers and the China Market During Rapprochement"
Mentor: Tim Borstelmann, Professor of History, University of Nebraska

Fellow: Sarah Coleman, History, Princeton University
“To reward the wrong way is not the American way:” Welfare, Immigrants’ Rights and the Battle Over Benefits 1990 -1997”
Mentor: David Gutiérrez, Professor of History, University of California San Diego

Moderator: Aynne Kokas, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia and non-resident scholar in Chinese Media, Institute of Public Policy at Rice University

May
12
10:30AM

2016 Spring Fellows Conference

May 12, 2016 - May 13, 2016

Every year, the Miller Center Fellowship Program supports the completion of promising dissertations that employ history to shed light on American politics and public policy, foreign relations and the impact of global affairs on the United States, media and politics, and the role of the presidency in shaping American political development. 

The current Miller Center fellows will conclude their year with a spring fellowship conference.  Fellows will present their research and findings to scholars from the Miller Center and the University of Virginia.  During the conference each fellow’s dissertation is critiqued by his or her dream mentor and Miller Center and University of Virginia scholars. 

Of particular note, will be a manuscript review of the forthcoming book, In the Heat of the Summer, by noted scholar, Michael Flamm, Chair of the History Department at Ohio Wesleyan University.  The review, on Thursday, May 12, will also feature panelists Garnette Cadogan, Visiting Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia and Visiting Scholar, Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University; Michael Fortner, Assistant Professor of Urban Studies at City University of New York; and Claudrena Harold, Associate Professor of History at the University of Virginia. The panel will be moderated by Andrew Kahrl,  Assistant Professor of History at the University of Virginia.

The conference is open to the public, please RSVP to Linda Winecoff at Ljw7e@virginia.edu.

May
9
11:00AM
Greg JaffeMatthew T. Sherman

PBS World Channel National Broadcast:  Virginia, June 12, 2016/Nationally, June 15, 2016

Greg Jaffe has covered the White House for The Washington Post since 2009.  In 2000, he shared (with Tom Ricks) the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting for a piece he did on the Pentagon while at the Wall Street Journal. He is the co-author (with David Cloud) of, The Fourth Star: Four Generals and the Epic Struggle for the Future of the United States Army (Random Books, 2009).

Matthew T. Sherman is a foreign affairs analyst and specialist who has served as a senior advisor to the State Department and the U.S. military. While in the private sector, he specializes in the political economy, security dynamics and commercial markets of the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia, providing analysis of the regional environment and geopolitical impact. Since September 2012, Mr. Sherman has been deployed to Afghanistan with the United States Department of Defense, serving as a senior civilian advisor to numerous operational and strategic commanders. Most recently, he was the Senior Advisor to the Resolute Support Commander, General John F. Campbell.

This event is part of…

Aftermath of the Endless War: This series of American Forum episodes examined the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and features conversations with several military, political, and diplomatic experts.

Apr
20
11:00AM
Andrew R. Highsmith

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, May 8, 2016/Nationally, May 11, 2016

Andrew R. Highsmith is an assistant Professor at the University of California-Irvine. He is a specialist in modern U.S. history with particular interest in policy, racial and economic inequalities, and public health. His first book, Demolition Means Progress: Flint, Michigan, and the Fate of the American Metropolis, explores the spatial and structural barriers to racial equality and economic opportunity in metropolitan Flint from the early 20th century to the present. An in-depth case study of the political economy of racial and economic inequality in modern America, Demolition explains how the perennial quest for urban renewal—even more than white flight, corporate abandonment, and other forces—contributed to mass suburbanization, racial and economic division, deindustrialization, and political fragmentation. 

Apr
13
3:00PM

The European Refugee Crisis: Consequences and Solutions

David Martin, Charles Benjamin, Hannah Winnick, Victoria Rietig, Fern Hauck

April 13, 2016, 3:00PM

David MartinCharles BenjaminHannah WinnickVictoria RietigFern Hauck

This event will take place in New Cabell Hall 236 on UVA central grounds. This panel is part of the interdisciplinary “Flight and Refuge: The European Crisis in Global Perspective” conference at UVA and will be moderated by Will Hitchcock.

David Martin is the Warner-Booker Distinguished Professor International Law at UVA. He has helped shape immigration and refugee policy while serving in several key U.S. government posts, including as principal deputy general counsel of the Department of Homeland Security from 2009-2010.

Charles Benjamin is the president of the Near East Foundation. He has over twenty-five years of experience in international development, with extensive experience in community development and natural resources management though the Middle East and Africa. 

Hannah Winnick is the program director for Transatlantic Dialogues on Democracy and Social Policy at the Heinrich Boell Foundation North America. The program aims to enhance transatlantic policy exchange on responsible policies for the humane and dignified treatment of migrants and refugees.

Victoria Rietig is a policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute, where she works for the Regional Migration Study Group and the Transatlantic Council on Migration. She is also a Nonresident Fellow with Migration Policy Institute Europe.

Fern Hauck is associate professor of family medicine and public health services at the UVA School of Medicine. She started the International Family Medicine Clinic in 2002, which serves the refugee population of Charlottesville.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Apr
13
11:00AM
Carla Power

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, May 1, 2016/Nationally, May 4, 2016

A journalist specializing in Muslim societies, global social issues and culture, Carla Power is the author of If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran. The book is an account of a year in intense study with the traditional Islamic scholar Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi. She writes for Time and is a former correspondent for Newsweek, where she produced award-winning stories, reporting from Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Her essays have appeared in a wide range of publications, from Vogue and O: The Oprah Magazine to The New York Times Magazine, The Guardian, and Foreign PolicyPhoto Credit: Jamie Smith

Apr
12
6:00PM

American Forum - America’s War For the Greater Middle East

Andrew J. Bacevich

April 12, 2016, 6:00PM

Andrew J. Bacevich

PLEASE NOTE TIME OF EVENT:  6:00 p.m. - 7:15 P.M.

From the end of World War II until 1980, virtually no American soldiers were killed in action while serving in the Greater Middle East. Since 1990, virtually no American soldiers have been killed in action anywhere else. What caused this shift? Andrew J. Bacevich, one of the country’s most respected voices on foreign affairs, offers an incisive critical history of this ongoing military enterprise—now more than thirty years old and with no end in sight. Bacevich is a retired professor of history and international relations at Boston University. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he served for 23 years as a commissioned officer in the United States Army, including tours of duty in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf, and rising to the rank of Colonel. His son, Lt. Andrew Bacevich was killed in action in Iraq in 2007. Bacevich received his PhD in American diplomatic history from Princeton. Before joining the faculty of Boston University in 1998, he taught at West Point and at Johns Hopkins University. His three most recent books, Breach of Trust, Washington Rules, and The Limits of Power were on The New York Times bestseller list. A winner of the Lannan Notable Book Award, he lectures frequently at universities around the country. A book signing will follow his appearance. Photo Credit: Dale Robbins, Moyers Co.

This event is part of…

Aftermath of the Endless War: This series of American Forum episodes examined the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and features conversations with several military, political, and diplomatic experts.

Apr
5
3:30PM
Barbara Perry

This event is open to the public. No RSVP is required.

Barbara Perry is the Ethics and Institutions Professor, director of Presidential Studies, and co-chair of the Presidential Oral History Program at the Miller Center. She directed the Edward M. Kennedy Oral History Project and produced a commemorative volume on Senator Kennedy’s interviews. Her eleven authored or edited books include two Kennedy family biographies: Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch and Jacqueline Kennedy: First Lady of the New Frontier.

This event is part of…

Historical Presidency: The 2016 Historical Presidency series will examine the transition from the campaign trail to the Oval Office and executive leadership during a president’s crucial first year. Learn more in the Historical Presidency brochure (PDF).

Apr
5
11:00AM

This event will take place at the Hay-Adams Hotel, 800 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C.

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and UVA's Miller Center are hosting the 2016 Mortimer Caplin Conference. This collaborative program will focus on fiscal issues facing the next president.

This conference is part of the Miller Center's First Year Project, a three-year initiative that will develop bipartisan insights and recommendations to guide the next president in his or her first year.

Apr
5
11:00AM
Jeffrey FrankWill Hitchcock

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, April 24, 2016/Nationally, April 27, 2016

Jeffrey Frank is a journalist and former deputy editor of the Outlook section at The Washington Post, as well as a senior editor at The New Yorker.  His book, Ike and Dick, is a narrative history that explores the complicated political and personal relationship between Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon—a sometimes painful association that lasted nearly 20 years. Photo Credit: Jon Reis

Will Hitchcock is professor of history at the University of Virginia and director of academic programs at the Miller Center. His work and teaching focuses on the international, diplomatic and military history of the 20th Century, with a particular focus on the era of the world wars and the cold war. He is currently completing a new book titled “The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s.” 

Apr
5
9:30AM
Mitch DanielsAlice RivlinAnn Compton

This conference is part of the Miller Center's First Year Project, a three-year initiative that will develop bipartisan insights and recommendations to guide the next president in his or her first year.

Apr
5
9:30AM

America’s Fiscal and Financial Future: The 2016 Caplin Conference

Mitch Daniels, Alice Rivlin, Ann Compton

April 5, 2016, 9:30AM

Mitch DanielsAlice RivlinAnn Compton

This event will take place at the Hay-Adams Hotel, 800 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C.

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and UVA's Miller Center are hosting the 2016 Mortimer Caplin Conference. This collaborative program will focus on fiscal issues facing the next president.

This conference is part of the Miller Center's First Year Project, a three-year initiative that will develop bipartisan insights and recommendations to guide the next president in his or her first year.

Mar
30
11:00AM

American Forum - The Rise of ISIS—The New Enemy

Joby Warrick

March 30, 2016, 11:00AM

Joby Warrick

PBS  Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, April 17, 2016/Nationally, April 20, 2016

Joby Warrick is a reporter for The Washington Post and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize. In his new book, Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS, he tracks the rise of the terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and the emergence of what is now called ISIS, and the strategic mistakes of Presidents Bush and Obama leading to the banner of ISIS being raised over huge swaths of Syria and Iraq. Drawing on high-level access to CIA and Jordanian sources, Warrick weaves gripping, moment-by-moment operational details with the perspectives of diplomats and spies, generals and heads of state, many of whom foresaw a menace worse than al Qaeda and tried desperately to stop it.

This event is part of…

Aftermath of the Endless War: This series of American Forum episodes examined the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and features conversations with several military, political, and diplomatic experts.

Mar
29
1:35PM

American Forum - The Worst First Year of a Presidency

Gary Gallagher

March 29, 2016, 1:35PM

Gary Gallagher

PBS Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, May 29, 2016/Nationally, June 1, 2016

Gary Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War and director of the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History at the University of Virginia. He has published widely in the field of Civil War-era history, most recently Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty; The Union War; and Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War. In 2010-2012, he held the Cavaliers’ Distinguished Teaching Professorship, the highest teaching award conveyed by the University of Virginia.

Mar
25
2:00PM
Ronald HamptonElizabeth Hinton

This event will be held in Nau Hall Auditorium (Room 101) on Central Grounds

 

From Ferguson to Baltimore, the reemergence of police brutality crises in American cities has sparked a series of passionate debates surrounding the intersection of race and criminal justice. Reoccurring problems associated with the excessive use of deadly force by police officers are under intense scrutiny by the national media, policymakers, and social activist groups across the country. The Miller Center's Great Issues program, in conjunction with the Black Student Research Network (BSRN), the Black Student Alliance (BSA), the Latino Student Alliance (LSA), the NAACP, and the University Democrats, will explore these issues through a panel discussion featuring Ronald Hampton and Elizabeth Hinton. The panel will uncover the nature and history of policing in America, while also looking forward to policy solutions of the future. 

Ronald Hampton serves on the advisory board of the National Police Accountability Project. He retired from the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department after twenty-three years of service as Community Relations Officer. Hampton is the immediate past Executive Director of the National Black Police Association, Inc., where he was involved in designing and delivering community policing and problem solving training for residents in public housing as well as overseeing a project dealing with intervention and crime prevention through alternative community sentencing. He has assisted the Department of Justice’s Community Relations Services and has worked with the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, Amnesty International USA, and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Elizabeth Hinton is assistant professor in the Department of History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. Hinton’s research focuses on the persistence of poverty and racial inequality in the twentieth century United States. Her current scholarship considers the transformation of domestic social programs and urban policing after the Civil Rights Movement. In her forthcoming book, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: Race and Federal Policy in American Cities (with Harvard University Press), Hinton examines the implementation of federal law enforcement programs beginning in the mid-1960s that laid the groundwork for the mass incarceration of American citizens.

This event is part of…

Great Issues: Our Great Issues programming provides scholarly expertise on a wide range of policy issues for the public, the media, and the policy community, with an aim towards increasing public discourse about national and global challenges.

Mar
22
11:00AM
Eric S. Edelman

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, April 10, 2016/Nationally, April 13, 2016

Veteran diplomat Eric S. Edelman, an adviser to both the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations and former top aide to Vice President Dick Cheney and GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, discusses U.S. foreign policy challenges in a world of constantly shifting terror threats and new geopolitical conflict.  Ambassador Edelman is the recently named 2016 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center. Currently, he is the Hertog Distinguished Practitioner in Residence at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, after retiring as a career minister from the U.S. Foreign Service in 2009. 

Mar
19
2:53PM

American Forum - Equal Justice?

Bryan Stevenson

March 19, 2016, 2:53PM

Bryan Stevenson

PBS World Channel National Broadcast: Virginia, May 15, 2016/Nationally, May 18, 2016

Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, is executive director of Equal Justice Initiative and a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated, and the condemned. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School and the Harvard School of Government, and has been awarded 21 honorary doctorate degrees.Stevenson’s work fighting poverty and challenging racial discrimination in the criminal justice system has won him numerous awards, including the ABA Wisdom Award for Public Service, the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Award Prize, the Olaf Palme International Prize, the ACLU National Medal Of Liberty, the National Public Interest Lawyer of the Year Award, the Gruber Prize for International Justice, and the Ford Foundation Visionaries Award. Photo Credit: Nina Subin

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