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Apr
16
3:30PM

James Madison and the Brink of National Ruin

Alan Taylor

April 16, 2014, 3:30PM

Alan Taylor

ALAN TAYLOR is the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor at the University of Virginia.  His books include William Cooper's Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early Republic and The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian AlliesWilliam Cooper’s Town won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize, in addition to the Bancroft and Beveridge prizes.  He is a contributing editor for The New Republic.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Apr
16
11:00AM

American Forum - National Security and Debates Regarding Domestic Surveillance

John Rizzo, Genevieve Lester

April 16, 2014, 11:00AM

John Rizzo

JOHN RIZZO had a 34-year career as a lawyer at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), culminating with seven years as the Agency’s chief legal officer. In the post-9/11 era, he helped create and implement the full spectrum of aggressive counterterrorist operations against al Qaeda, including the so-called “enhanced interrogation program” and lethal strikes against the al Qaeda leadership. Since retiring from the CIA, he has served as senior counsel at a Washington, DC, law firm and is a visiting scholar at the Hoover Institution. In his book, Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA, Rizzo charts the CIA’s evolution from shadowy entity to an organization exposed to new laws, rules, and a seemingly never-ending string of public controversies.

GENEVIEVE LESTER is visiting assistant professor, coordinator of intelligence studies, and senior fellow at Georgetown’s Center for Security Studies. Her areas of interest are American politics, international relations, and security, with an emphasis on intelligence and accountability. Currently a research fellow at the University of California Washington Center, Lester served as a research fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies-U.S., an editor of International Affairs, and a Fulbright Scholar at the Technical University, Berlin.

Apr
8
11:00AM

American Forum - 41: Inside the Presidency of George H. W. Bush

Michael Nelson, Barbara Perry

April 8, 2014, 11:00AM

Michael Nelson Barbara Perry

41: Inside the Presidency of George H. W. Bush, draws on interviews with senior White House and Cabinet officials conducted during the Miller Center’s Bush Oral History Project. Topics include how Bush organized and staffed his administration, operated on the international stage, followed his own brand of Republican conservatism, handled legislative affairs, and made judicial appointments. 41 was co-edited by the Miller Center’s MICHAEL NELSON and BARBARA PERRY. Nelson is a senior fellow in the Center’s Presidential Oral History Program and the Fulmer Professor of Political Science at Rhodes College. His books include Governing at Home: The White House and Domestic Policymaking and The Presidency and the Political System. Perry is co-chair of the Presidential Oral History Program and is the author of Rose Kennedy: The Life and Times of a Political Matriarch and Jacqueline Kennedy: First Lady of the New Frontier.

Apr
4
11:00AM

How the United States Should Respond to Emerging Powers

James B. Steinberg

April 4, 2014, 11:00AM

James B. Steinberg

JAMES B. STEINBERG, Dean of the Maxwell School and University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs, and Law at Syracuse University, and former Deputy Secretary of State in the Obama Administration, will discuss the implications of the foreign policy strategies of emerging powers for U.S. foreign policy.

Steinberg's address will build on the invitation-only academic event, the 2014 WILLIAM AND CAROL STEVENSON CONFERENCE, “Comparative Strategy in the Emerging World Order,” which will convene scholars and practitioners from Brazil, China, Germany, India, Israel, Russia, and Turkey.

Apr
1
5:30PM

Special Event - Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam’s Most Infamous Prison

Alvin Townley, Admiral Bob Shumaker

April 1, 2014, 5:30PM

Alvin Townley Admiral Bob Shumaker

Best-selling author ALVIN TOWNLEY will discuss his book, Defiant: The POWs Who Endured Vietnam’s Most Infamous Prison, the Women Who Fought for Them, and the One Who Never Returned. From the hundreds of brave Americans held captive during the Vietnam War, the North Vietnamese singled out the 11 most uncooperative, influential, and subversive –Vietnam’s own Dirty Dozen. These leaders were exiled to a dreadful prison called Alcatraz, where despite torture and isolation, the leadership, resilience, and defiance of the “Alcatraz 11” became legend. While North Vietnam imprisoned these men for more than seven years, their remarkable wives soldiered on at home; some didn’t learn of their husbands’ fates for more than four years. These women struggled with the U. S. and North Vietnamese governments alike to secure the safe return of their loved ones. Their legacy lives on in the National League of POW/MIA Families, which they founded.

This event will also feature ADMIRAL BOB SHUMAKER, the second-longest-serving POW in Vietnam and member of the “Alcatraz 11.” Please RSVP to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

Mar
28
12:30PM

Inventing the Military-Industrial Complex

Jamie Morin, Douglas O'Reagan, Kate Epstein

March 28, 2014, 12:30PM

Jamie Morin Douglas O'Reagan Kate Epstein

On March 28, the Miller Center will host a closed-session academic roundtable on KATE EPSTEIN’s Torpedo: Inventing the Military-Industrial Complex in the United States and Great Britain. JAMIE MORIN, assistant secretary of the Air Force for financial management and comptroller, and Miller Center National Fellow DOUGLAS O’REAGAN will offer comments. The roundtable will address the broad implications of Epstein’s work, including the development and evolution of the military-industrial complex – and will assess what it means to trace the history of something as amorphous as a complex.

The roundtable is co-sponsored by the Department of Engineering and Society at UVa’s School of Engineering.

This event will be closed to the general public, but is open to UVA faculty and students. It will be webcast live and archived at www.millercenter.org

Mar
26
11:00AM

American Forum - The Mind of Vladimir Putin

Clifford Gaddy, Yuri Urbanovich

March 26, 2014, 11:00AM

Clifford Gaddy Yuri Urbanovich

Original Air Date on Public Television: April 13, 2014

CLIFFORD GADDY, an economist specializing in Russia, is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. His book  Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (with Fiona Hill),  attempts to answer the question, "Who is Mr. Putin?" Drawing on many sources, including their own personal encounters with Putin, Gaddy and Hill argue that there are, in fact, several "real Putins” who have been shaped by many influences. Gaddy’s other books include Bear Traps on Russia’s Road to Modernization and The Siberian Curse: How Communist Planners Left Russia Out in the Cold. In the mid-1990s, Gaddy was an advisor to the Russian finance ministry.

YURI URBANOVICH is a lecturer in the departments of politics and Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Virginia. He served as a consultant to the Soviet Delegation at the Geneva Conference on Disarmament and to President Jimmy Carter on a trip to the Republic of Georgia for preliminary assessment of the relations between the opposing sides (Georgians and Abkhazians) after the brutal conflict of the early 1990's.

Mar
20
12:30PM
Morris P. Fiorina

MORRIS P. FIORINA is the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution. He has written widely on American government and politics, with special emphasis on topics in the study of representation and elections. His publications include Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel Abrams and Jeremy Pope), and most recently, Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics (with Samuel Abrams). Fiorina has served on the editorial boards of a dozen journals, and from 1986-1990 served as chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2006 the Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior Section of the American Political Science Association awarded him the Warren E. Miller Prize for career contributions to the field. Most recently he was named the 2009 Harold Lasswell Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.

Please note this colloquium will take place on a Thursday. Lunch will be served. RSVP required by noon on Tuesday, March 18 to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

This event is part of…

The Polarization in Historical Perspective Series: There is a growing sense today that the American political system is inadequate to the task of addressing the major challenges facing the nation, both foreign and domestic. A growing ideological gap between the political parties – partisan polarization, abetted by the rise of highly ideological interest groups and a balkanized mass media – is routinely cited as a primary cause of the nation’s ills.

Yet, despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of partisan polarization, we know very little about how these developments relate to previous episodes of partisan rancor in American history; how they resonate beyond the Washington beltway; and how they are likely to affect important constituencies, such as Hispanic voters, who are likely to have a profound influence on future party alignments.

This themed colloquia series, organized by the Miller Center's SIDNEY MILKIS, will probe these questions and shed important light on the difficult yet indispensible connection between partisanship and American democracy.

Mar
19
3:30PM

U.S. Grant and the Crisis of Reconstruction

Joan Waugh

March 19, 2014, 3:30PM

Joan Waugh

JOAN WAUGH is professor in the UCLA History Department and researches and writes about nineteenth-century America, specializing in the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Gilded Age eras. She has published numerous essays and books on Civil War topics, both single-authored and edited, including her prize-winning U. S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Mar
19
11:00AM

American Forum - Glock and Gun Culture in America

Paul M. Barrett

March 19, 2014, 11:00AM

Paul M. Barrett

Original Air Date on Public Television: April 6, 2014

PAUL BARRETT'S book, Glock: The Rise of America's Gun, is the inside account of how the now legendary Glock pistol became the weapon of choice for law enforcers and law breakers in the U.S., and a compelling chronicle of the evolution of gun culture in America. Created in 1982 by Gaston Glock, the Glock pistol arrived in America at a fortuitous time when law enforcement agencies needed a new gun. Barrett examines the place of gun ownership in American society with research and detachment, and provides a sober voice as the nation still wrestles with the aftermath of Sandy Hook and other notorious mass shootings.

Barrett is the author of two other acclaimed books: American Islam: The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion and The Good Black: A True Story of Race in America. He is assistant managing editor of Bloomberg Businessweek magazine and writes for the New York Times Sunday Book ReviewPhoto Credit: David Rudes

Mar
5
11:00AM
Michael S. Neiberg

The common explanation for the outbreak of World War I depicts Europe as a minefield of nationalism, needing only the slightest pressure to set off an explosion of passion that would rip the continent apart. But in a crucial reexamination of the outbreak of violence, MICHAEL NIEBERG argues that ordinary Europeans, unlike their political and military leaders, neither wanted nor expected war during the fateful summer of 1914. By training his eye on the ways that people outside the halls of power reacted to the rapid onset and escalation of the fighting, Neiberg challenges the notion that Europeans were rabid nationalists intent on mass slaughter. He reveals instead a complex set of allegiances that cut across national boundaries. Neiberg marshals letters, diaries, and memoirs of ordinary citizens across Europe to show that the onset of war was experienced as a sudden, unexpected event. As they watched a minor diplomatic crisis erupt into a continental bloodbath, they expressed shock, revulsion, and fear. But when bargains between belligerent governments began to crumble under the weight of conflict, public disillusionment soon followed. Yet it was only after the fighting acquired its own horrible momentum that national hatreds emerged under the pressure of mutually escalating threats, wartime atrocities, and intense government propaganda. 

Dance of the Furies gives voice to a generation who found themselves compelled to participate in a ghastly, protracted orgy of violence they never imagined would come to pass.

Feb
28
12:30PM
Cristina Beltran

CRISTINA BELTRAN is associate professor of social and cultural analysis at New York University, and author of The Trouble with Unity: Latino Politics and the Creation of Identity. Her research centers on the intersection of Latino politics and political theory. Her current project (provisionally titled Latino Conservatives: Racial Shame, Racial Success, and the Politics of Transformation) is an exploration of how Latino conservative thought is shaped not only by ideology but through a potent combination of emotion, expression, and aesthetics. Beltran's work has appeared in Political Theory, Aztlan: A Journal of Chicano Studies, Political Research Quarterly, and various edited volumes.

Lunch will be served. RSVP required by noon on Wednesday, February 26 to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

This event is being co-sponsored by the Politics Department's Political Theory Colloquium.

This event is part of…

The Polarization in Historical Perspective Series: There is a growing sense today that the American political system is inadequate to the task of addressing the major challenges facing the nation, both foreign and domestic. A growing ideological gap between the political parties – partisan polarization, abetted by the rise of highly ideological interest groups and a balkanized mass media – is routinely cited as a primary cause of the nation’s ills.

Yet, despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of partisan polarization, we know very little about how these developments relate to previous episodes of partisan rancor in American history; how they resonate beyond the Washington beltway; and how they are likely to affect important constituencies, such as Hispanic voters, who are likely to have a profound influence on future party alignments.

This themed colloquia series, organized by the Miller Center's SIDNEY MILKIS, will probe these questions and shed important light on the difficult yet indispensible connection between partisanship and American democracy.

Feb
26
3:30PM
Michael F. Holt

MICHAEL F. HOLT is Langbourne M. Williams Professor of American History Emeritus at the University of Virginia where he taught for 37 years.  A specialist on 19th-century political history, and especially pre-Civil War political history, he is co-author or author of eight books, the most recent of which is The American Presidents Series’ Franklin Pierce.  He has delivered the Fleming Lectures at LSU, the Fortenbaugh Lecture at Gettysburg College, and the Allan Nevins Memorial Lecture at the Huntington Library.  In 1993-1994, he was the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge.

This event is part of…

The Historical Presidency Series: Organized by Gary W. Gallagher, renowned U.Va. history professor and Miller Center senior faculty associate, the inaugural 2013-2014 Historical Presidency series will examine executive leadership during a particularly calamitous period in our nation’s history.

Feb
26
11:00AM
Bob Moses

Legendary civil rights figure BOB MOSES, who risked death in Mississippi for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and inspired thousands of college students to join the movement, will engage in a personal discussion with Doug Blackmon about change in the "Deep Deep South" over the past half century, and the 50th anniversaries of Freedom Summer and the passage of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.  Moses will also discuss his ongoing work through the “Algebra Project,” teaching complex math in the nation's most troubled schools.

Feb
19
11:00AM

American Forum - Why Remember the Civil War/150th Anniversary Series

Gary W. Gallagher

February 19, 2014, 11:00AM

Gary W. Gallagher

One of the leading historians of the Civil War, GARY W. GALLAGHER, discusses why the Civil War still holds such a grip on the American imagination 150 years later and what we most need to remember from that conflict. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. He also supervises the Miller Center's Historical Presidency lecture series, a new initiative that offers perspective on how presidential leadership has evolved over time. He has written or edited more than 30 books on the Civil War. Gallagher's most recent book is Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty.Other books include The Union War, The Confederate War, Lee and His Generals in War and Memory, and Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War.

Feb
17
12:30PM

50 Years of the Great Society: Legacies of Lyndon Johnson’s Ann Arbor Address

Sidney M. Milkis, Harry Harding, Guian McKee

February 17, 2014, 12:30PM

Sidney M. Milkis Harry Harding Guian McKee

Fifty years ago this spring, Lyndon Johnson launched his Great Society initiative with a commencement address at the University of Michigan, where he offered a vision of U.S. government action across issues ranging from poverty to racial injustice to the environment. This special Presidents' Day panel organized by the Miller Center's GUIAN McKEE and SIDNEY M. MILKIS will also feature Dean HARRY HARDING of the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, and will offer perspective on the consequences, legacy, and relevance today of LBJ's landmark legislation.

Lunch will be served. RSVP required by noon on Wednesday, February 12 to mc-reservations@eservices.virginia.edu.

Feb
12
11:00AM

American Forum - An Empire of Influence not Arms

Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman

February 12, 2014, 11:00AM

Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman

Award-winning historian and novelist ELIZABETH COBBS HOFFMAN teaches history at San Diego State University. Her books have won four literary prizes, two for American history and two for fiction. In her latest book, American Umpire, Hoffman explores key turning points in history from George Washington to Barack Obama. She challenges the notion that the United States is an empire and asserts instead that America has performed the role of umpire since 1776, compelling adherence to rules that gradually earned broad approval, even though it also violated these rules on occasion.

Feb
10
11:00AM
Ambassador Ryan Crocker

AMBASSADOR RYAN CROCKER,the preeminent American diplomat to the Middle East, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Afghanistan, and the 2013 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center, discusses the interim nuclear deal with Iran, and what it means for the prospects of peace with the US and greater stability in the region. Crocker is the holder of the U.S. Foreign Service's highest rank, served as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan from 2011 to 2012, ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, and previously ambassador to Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait, and Lebanon.

Feb
5
11:00AM
Haley Barbour Evan Bayh

The Miller Center’s American Forum launches a new special series to discuss practical, non-partisan ideas for bringing life back to the beleaguered American middle class. Each episode will feature the co-chairs of a special commission organized as part of the Milstein Symposium, sharing the results of their efforts to find new, actionable solutions for supporting a strong middle class and a "New American Century." Former Mississippi GOVERNOR HALEY BARBOUR and former Indiana Governor and U.S. SENATOR EVAN BAYH discuss the findings of the first commission.

Jan
29
11:00AM

American Forum - When the Greatest Generation Wasn’t so Certain

Lynne Olson, Richard Moe

January 29, 2014, 11:00AM

Lynne Olson Richard Moe

LYNNE OLSON and RICHARD MOE discuss their books, Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America’s Fight Over World War II, 1939-1941 and Roosevelt’s Second Act: The Election of 1940 and the Politics of War. Spanning the years 1939 to 1941, Those Angry Days by Lynne Olson vividly re-creates the rancorous internal squabbles that gripped the United States in the period leading up to Pearl Harbor. Before Olson began writing books full time, she worked more than ten years as a journalist, including stints as Moscow correspondent for the Associated Press and White House correspondent for The Baltimore Sun. In Roosevelt's Second Act, Moe focuses on a turning point in American political history: FDR's decision to seek a third term. Moe served as president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, chief of staff to Vice President Walter Mondale, and on President Jimmy Carter's senior staff. A Photo Credit for Lynn Olson: Stanley Cloud

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