Miller Center

American President

John Adams (1735–1826)

Portrait of John Adams

Facts at a Glance

Term
2nd President of the United States (1797–1801)
Born
October 30, 1735, North Precinct of Braintree (now Quincy), Massachusetts
Nickname
“Atlas of Independence”
Education
Harvard College (graduated 1755)
Religion
Unitarian
Career
Lawyer
Marriage
October 25, 1764, to Abigail Smith (1744–1818)
Children
Abigail Amelia (1765–1813), John Quincy (1767–1848), Susanna (1768–1770), Charles (1770–1800), Thomas Boylston (1772–1832)
Political Party
Federalist
Writings
The Works of John Adams, The Adams-Jefferson Letters, Diary and Autobiography, The Papers of John Adams, The Political Writings of John Adams
Died
July 4, 1826, in Quincy, Massachusetts
Buried
Quincy, Massachusetts
A Life in Brief
Before becoming President in 1797, John Adams built his reputation as a blunt-speaking man of independent mind. A fervent patriot and brilliant intellectual, Adams served as a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress between 1774 and 1777, as a diplomat in Europe from 1778 to 1788, and as vice president during the Washington administration. More »

Essays on John Adams and His Administration

John Adams
A Life in Brief
Life Before the Presidency
Campaigns and Elections
Domestic Affairs
Foreign Affairs
Life After the Presidency
Family Life
The American Franchise
Impact and Legacy
Key Events
First Lady
Abigail Adams
Vice President
Thomas Jefferson (1797-1801)
Secretary of State
Timothy Pickering (1797-1800)
John Marshall (1800-1801)
Secretary of War
James McHenry (1797-1800)
Samuel Dexter (1800–1801)
Postmaster General
Joseph Habersham (1797–1801)
Secretary of the Treasury
Oliver Wolcott Jr. (1797–1800)
Samuel Dexter (1801–1801)
Attorney General
Charles Lee (1797–1801)
Secretary of the Navy
Benjamin Stoddert (1798–1801)

Consulting Editor: C. James Taylor

Mr. Taylor is the editor-in-chief of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society.