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Apr
25
12:30PM

Colloquium - Polarization in Historical Perspective

William A. Galston, William Kristol

April 25, 2014, 12:30PM

William A. Galston William Kristol

WILLIAM A. GALSTON holds the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in the Brookings Institution’s Governance Studies Program, where he serves as a senior fellow. A former policy advisor to President Clinton and presidential candidates, Galston is an expert on domestic policy, political campaigns, and elections. His current research focuses on designing a new social contract and the implications of political polarization.

WILLIAM KRISTOL is editor of The Weekly Standard, which, together with Fred Barnes and John Podhoretz, he founded in 1995. Kristol regularly appears on Fox News Sunday and on the Fox News Channel.  Prior to starting The Weekly Standard, Kristol led the Project for the Republican Future and served as chief of staff to Vice President Dan Quayle during the Bush administration and to Secretary of Education William Bennett under President Reagan. Before coming to Washington in 1985, Kristol taught politics at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

This colloquium is now full, but please tune in to the live webcast available at www.millercenter.org.

This event is part of…

The Polarization in Historical Perspective Series: There is a growing sense today that the American political system is inadequate to the task of addressing the major challenges facing the nation, both foreign and domestic. A growing ideological gap between the political parties – partisan polarization, abetted by the rise of highly ideological interest groups and a balkanized mass media – is routinely cited as a primary cause of the nation’s ills.

Yet, despite considerable interest in the causes and consequences of partisan polarization, we know very little about how these developments relate to previous episodes of partisan rancor in American history; how they resonate beyond the Washington beltway; and how they are likely to affect important constituencies, such as Hispanic voters, who are likely to have a profound influence on future party alignments.

This themed colloquia series, organized by the Miller Center's SIDNEY MILKIS, will probe these questions and shed important light on the difficult yet indispensible connection between partisanship and American democracy.

Apr
30
11:00AM
Todd Purdum

Airs on Public Television: May 18, 2014
Check your local listings for specific channels and times

Washington journalist TODD PURDUM recounts the dramatic political battle to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on the 50th anniversary of its passage. In his latest book, An Idea Whose Time Has Come, Purdum recreates the legislative maneuvering and the all-too-human figures who managed, in just over a year, to create a bill that prompted the longest filibuster in the history of the U.S. Senate yet was ultimately adopted with overwhelming bipartisan support. Purdum evokes the high purpose and low dealings that marked the creation of this monumental law, drawing on extensive archival research and dozens of new interviews that bring to life this signal achievement in American history. A book signing will follow his Forum. Photo Credit: Gasper Tringale

May
2
9:00AM

Co-sponsored by the Miller Center; Center for the Study of Race and the Law; and the Office of the Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity, UVa

On July 2, 1964, Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, widely celebrated as the crowning achievement of a revolution in U.S. race relations that ramified into many spheres of domestic and international relations. One year earlier, John Kennedy had proposed a more moderate civil rights bill, which was nevertheless the most far-reaching piece of civil rights legislation proposed in 88 years.

This symposium will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act with an exploration of the Act’s origins, impact, and significance within several broad contexts, including the social movements and public policy transformations that the Act symbolized, promoted, and institutionalized. 

May
7
11:00AM
Peniel E. Joseph

Airs on Public Television: May 25, 2014
Check your local listings for specific channels and times.

PENIEL E. JOSEPH, history professor at Tufts University, joins us to discuss his new biography, Stokely: A Life, about the charismatic and controversial black activist Stokely Carmichael, who stepped onto the pages of history when he called for “Black Power” during a speech one Mississippi night in 1966. In Stokely, Joseph presents a groundbreaking biography of Carmichael, using his life as a prism through which to view the transformative African-American freedom struggles of the 20th century.  Joseph is also the author of the award-winning Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama. He is the founder of a growing subfield in American history and Africana studies that he has characterized as "Black Power Studies," which is actively rewriting postwar American and African-American history. A book signing will follow his Forum.

May
8
9:00AM

2014 National Fellowship Conference

May 8, 2014 - May 9, 2014

The annual spring conference brings the fellows together with their mentors to present the fruits of their fellowship year.  You can read more about the fellows' projects and their projects here, or click the links below to specific panels to read a sample of their work.  If you would like to attend any of the panels listed below, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

May
8
9:30AM
“2014 National Fellowship Conference”

Metropolitan Histories of the 20th Century

Anthony Ross, Brent Cebul, Kelly Richter, Kim Phillips-Fein, Jim Sparrow, Meg Jacobs, Claudrena Harold

May 8, 2014, 9:30AM

Brent Cebul Kelly Richter Kim Phillips-Fein Jim Sparrow

Anthony Ross, History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
“‘The Ownership Society’: Mortgage Securitization and the Metropolitan Landscape Since the 1960s”
Mentor: Kim Phillips-Fein, New York University Gallatin School
                                               
Brent Cebul, History, University of Virginia
“Developmental State: The Politics of Business, Poverty, and Economic Empowerment from the New Deal to the New Democrats“
Mentor: Jim Sparrow, University of Chicago

Kelly Richter, History, Stanford University  
“Uneasy Border State: The Politics and Public Policy of Latino Illegal Immigration in Metropolitan California”
Richter is an immigration policy fellow funded by John and Rosemary Galbraith.
Mentor: Meg Jacobs, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderator: Claudrena Harold, University of Virginia

If you would like to attend this or any panels associated with the Fellowship Conference, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

May
8
12:45PM
“2014 National Fellowship Conference”

Methods and Modes of Resisting the State

Laura Blessing, Andrea Campbell, Sean Beienburg, John Dinan

May 8, 2014, 12:45PM

Laura Blessing Sean Beienburg

Laura Blessing, Politics, University of Virginia
“The New Politics of Taxation: The Republican Party and Anti-Tax Positions”
Mentor: Andrea Campbell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Sean Beienburg, Politics, Princeton University
“Constitutional Resistance in the States, 1880–2010”
Mentor: John Dinan, Wake Forest University

If you would like to attend this or any panels associated with the Fellowship Conference, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

May
8
3:00PM
“2014 National Fellowship Conference”

Bucking the System? Determinants of International Politics

Adam Liff, Rebecca Brubaker, William Hitchcock, Alastair Iain Johnston, Susan Hyde

May 8, 2014, 3:00PM

Adam Liff Rebecca Brubaker William Hitchcock

Adam Liff, Politics, Princeton University
“Shadowing the Hegemon? National Identity, Global Norms, and the Military Trajectories of Rising Powers”
Mentor: Alastair Iain Johnston, Harvard University

Rebecca Brubaker, International Politics, University of Oxford
“From the Un-Mixing to the Re-Mixing of Peoples: Understanding U.S.-Led Support for Minority Returns Following the Ethnic Conflict in Bosnia”
Mentor: Susan Hyde, Yale University

Moderator: William Hitchcock, University of Virginia

If you would like to attend this or any panels associated with the Fellowship Conference, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

May
9
9:15AM
“2014 National Fellowship Conference”

Cross-Border Transformations: War and Revolution in International History

Douglas O'Reagan, Jim Hershberg, J. Luis Ramos, Frank Ninkovich, Tico Braun

May 9, 2014, 9:15AM

Douglas O'Reagan J. Luis Ramos

Welcome Remarks from Gov. Baliles

 

Douglas O’Reagan, History of Science, University of California, Berkeley
“Science, Technology and Diplomacy: American, British, and French Efforts to Extract German Science and Technology During and Following the Second World War”
Mentor: Jim Hershberg, George Washington University

J. Luis Ramos, History, University of Chicago
“The Other Revolution: Politics, Culture, and the Transformation of U.S.-Mexican Relations after the Mexican Revolution, 1919–1930”
Mentor: Frank Ninkovich, St. John’s University

Moderator: Tico Braun, University of Virginia

If you would like to attend this or any panels associated with the Fellowship Conference, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

May
9
12:00PM
“2014 National Fellowship Conference”

Manuscript Review: When the World Seemed New

Jeff Engel, Andrew Card, David Farber, Melani McAlister

May 9, 2014, 12:00PM

Jeff Engel, When the World Seemed New: George H.W. Bush and the End of the Cold War.
Commenters:
Andrew Card, former White House Chief of Staff
David Farber, History, Temple University  
Melani McAlister, International Affairs, George Washington University

If you would like to attend this or any panels associated with the Fellowship Conference, please RSVP to mc-fellowship@virginia.edu.

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